Tag Archives: war on drugs

After Virginia Police Raid Wrong Address Innocent College Student Was Beaten, Arrested, and Evicted From Home

Maurice Neblett Police Raid Wrong House Cause Eviction

After Virginia police raided the wrong address, innocent Virginia Union University student Maurice Neblett was beaten, falsely arrested, and evicted from his apartment.

Note: This post is based on a a reader submission shared with Nevada Cop Block by Maurice Neblett. If you have videos, stories, upcoming events/protests, or personal interactions with the police (and/or “justice” system) that you would like to share, send them to us and we will do everything we can to bring it to the attention of the world.

In addition, you can visit the Nevada Cop Block resources section for information and links to the rights of citizens when dealing with police, during which you should always be filming.

(Several quotes used below were taken from a previous article on this incident by Amelia Heymann, a contributing writer at the Commonwealth Times, which is the student newspaper for Virginia Union University.)

During a February 2014 police raid, Maurice Neblett, who was naked at the time, was pulled out of bed, beaten by as many as a dozen policemen, and then falsely arrested. He was punched, kicked, and further battered with flashlights, rifle butts, and other objects in a beating that went on for at least five minutes.

Eventually, he was placed in a choke-hold and then handcuffed. While handcuffed, one of the officers involved began verbally taunting him. That officer, Richmond Police Officer Mark Sims, reportedly whispered in his ear, “Who has the most power, us or the Bloods?” and “We should have done this to your brother, but it does not matter because he will be gone for a very long time. You will too.”

Neblett’s address at the time was 531 W. Bacon St. in Richmond, Va. The address on their warrant was “Building Two, Apartment 2120 at 610 W. Bacon St.” Not only were police at the wrong address, the address listed on their warrant doesn’t actually exist. Even if it had been a legitimate address the corresponding number would be a block away.

Further complicating the story is the fact that the two officers who obtained the warrant claimed they had conducted a 30 day investigation after they “smelled marijuana in the area.” No drugs, or anything else illegal, were found during the raid. Nor was any evidence of  illegal activity by Neblett or anyone at his address ever found. The only charges filed against him, two felonies for “assaulting an officer,” were later dropped.

No connection to the Bloods, the street gang referenced by Sims while they were beating Neblett, has ever been established. Neblett has also continuously maintained that he had offered no resistance to justify the force used against him. Neblett claims the officers discussed who would among them would like to volunteer to “be an assaultee.”

Being released from jail and having the charges eventually dropped wasn’t the end of the disruption that the Richmond Police Department’s actions that night caused for Neblett, though. Because he was initially charged with a federal crime, Neblett was evicted from his apartment. He ended up homeless as a result, living out of his car for several months.

In addition, he states that he suffers daily from anxiety, post-traumatic stress, loss of sleep and “a profound and insurmountable loss of trust in the state, the city and their law enforcement officials.” Neblett is a criminal justice major at Virginia Union University and obviously this raid and its aftermath greatly affected his studies.

“I’m still in disbelief,” Neblett says. “I’m trying to figure out if I’m in a nightmare.”

However, Neblett isn’t just focusing on what happened to him and his own problems as a result he has filed a lawsuit against the Richmond Police Department and hopes the lawsuit can not only find justice for him but also can lead to changes in policy within the department that would prevent raids such as this from happening in the future.

“I’m here, I’m breathing, a lot of people that have been in similar situations aren’t here today,” Neblett says.”This is bigger than me, I’m just a grain of salt.”

Also, regardless of whether or how the fact he is a black man may have influenced the actions of the police who raided his house, Neblett maintains that this should be viewed as an issue which is bigger than just a potential race-based incident:

“This is not a color bearing issue,” Neblett says. “It is important we support this because it could happen to anyone. We have to address again that no one is above the law and they have to be held accountable for their actions”

As noted above, Maurice Neblett has filed a lawsuit against the Richmond Police. Obviously, regardless of the eventual outcome lawsuits and everything that goes into filing them can be very expensive. That’s one of the reasons the police and governments choose the targets that they do. If you can’t afford to fight them in court, then they often get away with even the most egregious abuses.

Neblett has asked us to share a link to a page he set up to help offset the costs of lawyers and other expenses involved in pursuing justice in this case. If you are able to, you can donate by clicking this link to his GoFundMe account. Even if you can’t help financially, you can help him by sharing that link to others.

Related Content on NVCopBlock.org:

CopBlock Founder Ademo Freeman Preparing to Challenge Drug War in Court Jan. 11th During Marijuana Arrest Trial

Marijuana Possession Trial Ademo Freeman Adam Mueller

“When I go to trial I’m not asking to not be punished. I’m asking not to be punished anymore. I’ve done nearly 50 days in jail. I’ve paid tens of thousands of dollars in legal fees, lost a year’s worth of time and have basically been on probation for a year” – Ademo Freeman

The following video and post was originally published at CopBlock.org by Asa J under the title, “CopBlock Founder Ademo Freeman To Square Off In Court Against Drug War.” Obviously, it refers to Ademo’s arrest last year in Ohio on charges of possession of the scary, dangerous “drug” marijuana, that most people could not care less about at this point. More specifically, it relates to the trial for those charges that begins next week, on January 11th.

Barring some sort of eleventh hour plea deal with a sentence of time served (he has stated he would not agree to any deal that requires additional jail/prison time), Ademo will be facing up to six years in prison and fines of $20,000 if he is found guilty. More than likely, his freedom hinges on someone in the jury exercising their “Jury Nullificationrights and ruling based on the morality of the War on (Some) Drugs and the prosecution of victimless crimes, rather than the letter of the law.

Note: If you have videos, stories, upcoming events/protests, or personal interactions with the police (and/or “justice” system) that you would like to share, send them to us and we will do everything we can to bring it to the attention of the world. In addition, you can visit the Nevada Cop Block resources section for information and links to the rights of citizens when dealing with police, during which you should always be filming.

CopBlock Founder Ademo Freeman To Square Off In Court Against Drug War

Next week, CopBlock co-founder Ademo Freeman will square off against those wishing to send him to prison for peacefully traveling with medical marijuana in a state that also recognizes legal medicinal use of the plant.

You heard that right. Due to the lack of legal framework surrounding medical use of cannabis in Ohio (even though the state passed medical cannabis in 2016), Ademo faces up to six years in prison and fines of $20,000 when he stands trail on January 11 for possession of his medicine.

As such, Ohio law stipulates that the Board of Pharmacy attempt to negotiate and enter into reciprocity agreements with other medical marijuana states before allowing use of their medicine. Before entering into an agreement with another state, the Board must determine that the state meet certain criteria.

First, the eligibility requirements imposed by the other state in order to obtain a registry identification card have to be substantially comparable to Ohio’s requirements. Second, the other state must also recognize patient or caregiver registration and identification cards issued in Ohio. Ohio has no such agreement with Colorado, the state Ademo obtained his medical cannabis card in, nor any other state for that matter. In fact, the politicians of Ohio have dragged their feet for two years on this issue depriving who knows how many from receiving medical cannabis and killing countless others.

Ademo is no stranger to the criminal justice system. Shortly after founding CopBlock with activist and friend Pete Eyre in 2010 the two were part of a group of activists arrested for recording public officials at the Franklin County, Massachusetts jail.

The following year Ademo was arrested for wiretapping and faced 21 years in prison after video surfaced from West High School in Manchester, New Hampshire showing a student being roughly pushed down onto a cafeteria table by police detective Darren Murphy.

Ademo recorded telephone conversations he had with a Manchester police captain, the West High principal and her assistant in attempt to bring attention to the incident. He represented himself in court and was sentenced to 90 days in jail and three years of probation. Those convictions were later thrown out by the New Hampshire Supreme Court however.

CopBlock is a decentralized organization made up of a diverse group of individuals united by their shared belief that “badges don’t grant extra rights,” CopBlock.org states. In this pursuit CopBlockers routinely draw attention to police brutality and corruption and are known for their controversial and sometimes intense encounters with police. Naturally, shining a light on the domestic enforcement arm of government attracts unwanted attention. In February, Ademo was arrested and charged with possession and trafficking marijuana and possession of hash oil in Warren County, Ohio.

According to WCPO, 24 pounds of marijuana and 26 vials of hash oil were found in Ademo’s car after he was pulled over by Ohio State Troopers for a missing license plate light. He was arraigned on a $75,000 bond.

From behind bars Ademo routinely spoke out about police accountability issues and problems with the criminal justice system. He was released from jail in March following a major bond reduction having refused a plea deal to serve one year in prison.

Ademo has long been a crusader against the drug war, an issue that routinely garners attention on the pages of CopBlock.org. An advocate of self-ownership and an opponent of victimless crime laws, it was in fact a 2004 marijuana conviction that ultimately led Ademo to co-found CopBlock.

Now, almost 14 years later, Ademo continues to stand up for his individual right to decide for himself what to put in his own body. Next Thursday he will stand trial in Warren County having refused another plea offer this week that would have resulted in a 36 month prison sentence suspended for 6 months in jail and three years probation.

In a live Facebook video on Friday Ademo explained why.

“I’m a medical marijuana patient, ” he said. “I held a valid medical marijuana card until December 17 of last year. Everything I was in possession of that day was my medicine.”

Having lived in Colorado for a short while Ademo decided to return to Ohio temporarily after his plans to make a permanent move to the state didn’t work out. Ademo and his spouse (at the time) had decided not to move his partner’s children so far from their biological father (who came back into his young childrens life) and instead set up a forever home in Michigan (another medical MJ state) after the kids finished school. The only problem was, Ademo never made it back. He was caged by state troopers in the Warren County jail for simply stepping over a line into an occupied territory that seriously needs to clarify its laws regarding the legal use of medicinal cannabis.

“While they say ‘trafficking,’ I had everything I owned in my car,” Ademo said. “There was no drug bust. There were no informants. This wasn’t done at a DUI [checkpoint], I didn’t sell weed to an undercover cop. That’s not my intention. I use weed for medical purposes and I merely had six months worth of medicine with me.”

Ademo has asked people to please call assistant prosecutor Chris Delnicki at the telephone number 513-695-1325 to voice their support. He has also asked friends to send character letters stating that jail isn’t the proper punishment for his so-called “crimes” to Delnicki and/or Judge Robert Peeler at the address: 520 Justice Drive Lebanon, Ohio 45036.

“I don’t believe that my actions deserve 36 months in prison,” Ademo said. “When I go to trial I’m not asking to not be punished. I’m asking not to be punished anymore. I’ve done nearly 50 days in jail. I’ve paid tens of thousands of dollars in legal fees, lost a year’s worth of time and have basically been on probation for a year. I believe that that’s enough for someone with a medical marijuana card.”

To hear more of Ademo’s thoughts on the case listen below:

Original Facebook Live Video:

Related Content on NVCopBlock.org:

Video: Arkansas Police Beat Fifteen Year Old Who is Clearly Not Resisting Over Marijuana Pipe

Police Brutality Teen Farmington Arkansas

Two cops in Farmington, Arkansas assaulted a fifteen year old boy for the dangerous crime of having a dirty pipe in his pocket.

Note: This post and the video included with it was shared with Nevada Cop Block via reader submission. If you have videos, stories, upcoming events/protests, or personal interactions with the police (and/or “justice” system) that you would like to share, send them to us and we will do everything we can to bring it to the attention of the world. In addition, you can visit the Nevada Cop Block resources section for information and links to the rights of citizens when dealing with police, during which you should always be filming.

The post was originally published on the “NWA Lifestyle” blog by

In the video, the teen is clearly not resisting and based on his size and the fact that the two cops are each much bigger wouldn’t be much of a threat even if he intended to resist. Whether they were angry because he was initially reluctant to admit he had a pipe on him or they are just bullies that like to beat up on children, what this video shows amounts to child abuse. Abuse that anyone else not wearing one of those Magic Uniforms, including that teen’s own parents, would likely get arrested for.

Farmington Cops Use Excessive Force on Teenager in Kum ‘n’ Go

In a world where we encounter daily posts of videos showing excessive force by the police, here comes yet another example of police brutality. On December 31, 2017 the Farmington Police Department out of Farmington Arkansas arrested a 15 year male juvenile at a Kum ‘n’ Go. Initially detained under the suspicion of having a weed pipe in his pocket the encounter took a sudden violent turn.

The young man was in the bathroom of the popular convenience store, with his friend, when two police officers entered the bathroom and asked the young man what was in his pocket. Initially not wanting to admit that he had the pipe, the young man then admitted that it was a weed pipe to the law enforcement officers. When he went to pull the pipe out the police officers brutally threw the child against the wall and broke out his front tooth, all the while the kid is screaming in pain and declaring he isn’t resisting arrest. The officers continue to twist his arms and kneel on his back, even more brutally when the child loses his temper and calls them names after his tooth is knocked out and he is spouting blood everywhere.

Speaking for myself, I am horrified and disgusted at this behavior from law enforcement. These two cops, who are clearly larger and far stronger than the 5’7” , 125 LB., 15 year old obviously did not feel a threat of danger while they left another unattended teenager to film them. The boy continually cries out that he isn’t resisting. When he loses his temper, letting out a barrage of curses at the bully cop who just slammed his face into a wall, breaking his front tooth out; the officer elbows his face and twists the kid’s arms all he way up his back in what is clearly excessive and unnecessary force and revenge.

In a community that is usually a small and fairly quiet community the police forces seem to like to ignore rising gang problems and focus their attention on teens smoking weed, treating them like potential violent offenders? These officers were clearly NOT in danger, felt no threat of being in danger and had no cause to exert the amount of force they used on this child, which left medical damage to not only his face, but left a myriad of muscle damage to his back and shoulders.

For more on this story more commentary on Farmington as a deeper look at everything involved in this ongoing case please stay tuned, I will be writing a complete commentary and situation review. Be careful Farmington and Fayetteville residents! All around you gangs, like Gangster Disciples are growing bigger? Shootings in Farmington? Yes there are! Gangs of teenagers breaking into apartments and houses and jumping your kids? Yes, this is happening right down the road, but you aren’t hearing about it because it’s juveniles doing the offending! Yes this IS happening and you aren’t being told. Instead of dealing with the rising the gang problem, even when occurrences are being reported right away, you’ve got the quickly notorious Farmington Police Department beating up kids in their favorite spot, Kum ‘n’ Go.

I say let’s put an end to this abuse of power: email me all your stories, tell me everything; I’m airing it all!

Email me at [email protected]

Related Content on NVCopBlock.org:

Fourteen Members of “Law Enforcement” Charged As Result Of An FBI Drug Sting in North Carolina

Earlier this week, it was announced that after a two year long drug sting involving the FBI a total of fourteen members of law enforcement have been charged with drug crimes, including eleven within the state of North Carolina. According to WRAL-TV, all of the arrestees from North Carolina have confessed since being arrested. It wasn’t clear if that was part of a plea deal or if they simply chose to confess (my money is on door #1).

The arrests for charges related to cocaine and heroin included eight current or former police officers, three correctional officers, two Virginia prison employees, and one 911 dispatcher. The dispatcher, as well as all eight of the law enforcement  officers except one work or had worked for the Northampton County (NC) Sheriff’s Office. That includes five current and two former NCSO deputies.

Via WSPA News 7:

Thomas Walker, the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District, said multiple people were arrested in a major sting of cocaine and heroin operations. Those arrested include five current members of the Northampton County sheriff’s office.

They were charged with trafficking cocaine and heroin up and down the I-95 corridor.

On Wednesday in court, prosecutors showed photos and video of alleged wrong-doing, WRAL reported.

“They all gave some sort of confession,” a prosecutor told the judge, according to the TV station. “Each of these defendants admitted to their involvement.”

Nine of the officers were not granted bail on Wednesday because the judge said he needed more time to review the case, according to WRAL.

Walker said there were arrests at an airport in Halifax County and a warehouse in Rocky Mount. A second group was arrested at a warehouse in Rocky Mount. The undercover operation, called “Operation Rockfish,” has been ongoing for about a year and a half…

Arrested were:

  • Ikeisha Jacobs, 32, a deputy with the Northampton County Sheriff’s Office
  • Jason Boon, 29, a Northampton deputy
  • Jimmy Pair, 48, a Northampton deputy
  • Curtis Boone, 31, a Northampton deputy
  • Thomas Jefferson Allen II, 37, a Northampton deputy
  • Wardie Vincent Jr., 35, a former Northampton deputy
  • Cory Jackson, 43, formerly with the Northampton County Sheriff’s Office
  • Antonio Tillmon, 31, a Windsor City policeman
  • Adrienne Moody, 39, a North Carolina correctional officer
  • Alaina Sue Kamling, 27, a North Carolina correctional officer
  • Kavon Phillips, 25, a North Carolina correctional officer
  • Lann Tjuan Clanton, 36, a correctional officer with the Virginia Department of Corrections
  • Alphonso Ponton, 42, a Virginia correctional officer
  • Tohsa Dailey, 31, a 911 dispatch operator for Northampton County
  • Crystal Pierce, 31, of Raleigh

FBI Agent John Strong, who said he and the other agents involved were shocked (I tellya!) by the involvement of police officers, characterized it as “a breach of the public’s trust” in which those officers used their positions “to line their own pockets.”

Another guy who is shocked (I tellya!) is Northhampton County Sheriff Jack Smith, who saw roughly 15% of his 35 deputy department marched away in handcuffs, as a result of the case. He agreed with Agent Strong that this type of thing just cannot be tolerated, especially from members of law enforcement, stating:

“They’ve let me down. They’ve let the sheriff’s office down,” Smith said. “They’ve let the citizens down as well as their families. Most of them have children and they’ve let the down as well.”

For the record, guess who is not surprised at all by this and won’t be in any way surprised when they all get light sentences and possibly even just probation. (I’m talking about me, in case that isn’t really obvious.)

Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte’s “War On Drugs” is the Police State U.S. Policy Makers Dream Of

This post was written by  and originally published at the Center For a Stateless Society (C4SS) under the title “Why Duterte’s Drug War Can Happen Here and How To Stop It” Posts and other content you think are worth sharing with the CopBlock Network can be sent in to us via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. Some tips to make it more likely that your submission will get posted to the CopBlock Network can be found here.

(Note: This has been posted in its original form and no edits to the original text were made. Some links may have been added within the text and images have been added. In addition, the conclusions expressed within this initial introductory summary represent my own interpretation of what is being stated within Ryan’s writings.)

In the post below, Ryan discusses the current drug policies with in the Philippines and how it coincides with the desires of those within the United States government who created and then perpetuated the “War on Drugs.” As explained by Ryan, the reality is that those behind the drug policies in this country wish that they could use Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s tactics and in many cases have stated as much publicly.

Why Duterte’s Drug War Can Happen Here and How To Stop It

Rodrigo Duterte’s drug war in the Philippines is unique in its policy of extrajudicial murder of all drug dealers and users. It’s as much a cleansing of one’s population as any genocide. Still, I think Americans should understand that the logic underlying Duterte’s drug war isn’t dissimilar to ours. Once you’ve declared a “war” on an entire group of people, dehumanization is inevitable. The continued existence of drug criminals is seen as a burden and their non-compliance a violent threat. It wasn’t all that long ago Ronald Reagan characterized the drug war as not simply a matter of law and order, but a national security concern. Only 4 presidential administrations ago, in the early 90s, George H.W. Bush’s drug czar William Bennett said he had no issue with beheading drug dealers in public. Infamous chief of the LAPD Daryl Gates said that any drug offense is tantamount to treason and should be punished with the death penalty.

Even now there’s propaganda equating those who buy and sell drugs with terrorists deserving of death. Just this year Maine governor Paul Lepage unapologetically called for the guillotining of drug users on TV. Ronald Reagan’s characterization of drug crime as a matter of national security is to this day the official DEA position. The rather flimsy empirical connection between drug sales and funding of terrorism only gains serious currency in the national discourse because we’re conditioned to view these “criminals” as dangerous. Turning peaceful market participants into threats helps distract from the real enabler of foreign terrorists and criminal cartels’ drug profits: Drug laws.

What is happening in the Philippines is the logic behind all drug wars carried out to its terrifying conclusion. They are only unique in their consistency. What’s happening there can happen here. Trump has voiced his support for Duterte’s tactics and he’s appointed one of the most extreme Nixonian throwback drug warriors to be the most powerful prosecutor in the country. But what Trump lacks is a complicit population; so please, be more vocal in helping humanize people who are simply making a living or trying to enjoy themselves the same way hundreds of millions of Americans do legally — by being intoxicated. Do not rest content with the progress our culture has made, because it can disappear.

There’s been a groundswell of support for ending the criminalization of drugs the past few years, but we must look beyond legalization efforts. These attitudes on drugs aren’t determined by the laws. The laws are determined by the attitudes. We are told more and more to view drug use as a medical problem, but this too takes away the agency of most people who use drugs, who are not addicts and are otherwise unhealthy. Duterte too has characterized drug use as a sickness, so don’t assume the medical approach is purely a liberal narrative. One effective way to get rid of a disease people are willingly infecting themselves with is to kill those people off. So do not compromise the dignity and the normalization of peaceful drug use. The real solution to addiction is to treat addiction, and we can’t do that while all drug users are cast out into the shadows.

California Police Charge Man With “Driving Under the Influence” of Caffeine

**UPDATE** The DUI charge was dropped on December 29, 2016. (One day after this post was published – #JusSayin)

Joseph Schwab was pulled over in the Northern California county of Solano in August of 2015. In spite of a breathalyzer indicating he had no alcohol whatsoever in his system, he was arrested and forced to have blood drawn. Once again, no alcohol or any illegal drug was found in his system. In fact, the only drug found in his system was caffeine. In spite of that, he is being charged with a misdemeanor for driving under the influence of a drug.

Via TheGuardian.com:

Shcwab was driving home from work when he was pulled over by an agent from the California department of alcoholic beverage control, who was driving an unmarked vehicle. The agent said Schwab had cut her off and was driving erratically.

The 36-year-old union glazier was given a breathalyzer test which showed a 0.00% blood alcohol level, his attorney said. He was booked into county jail and had his blood drawn, but the resulting toxicology report came back negative for benzodiazepines, cocaine, opiates, THC, carisoprodol (a muscle relaxant), methamphetamine/MDMA, oxycodone, and zolpidem.

The sample was screened a second time by a laboratory in Pennsylvania, according to documents provided to the Guardian, where the sole positive result was for caffeine – a substance likely coursing through the veins of many drivers on the road at any given time.

“I’ve never seen this before,” said (defense attorney Stacey) Barrett. “I’ve never even heard of it.”

Barrett has filed a motion for the case to be dismissed because the charges were not brought until June 2016 – nearly 10 months after incident. If that motion is denied, Schwab will take his case to a jury on 11 January.

Sharon Henry, chief deputy district attorney for Solano County, said in a statement that her office was “conducting further investigation in this matter”.

“The charge of driving under the influence is not based upon the presence of caffeine in his system,” she added.

Barrett counters that if the prosecution has evidence of a different drug in her client’s system, it should have to provided that to her, based on the rules governing criminal procedings (sic).

“I have not been provided with any evidence to support a theory of prosecution for a substance other than caffeine at this time,” she said. “Nor I have received any statements, reports, etc documenting any ongoing investigation since the [toxicology report] dated 18 November 2015.”

Henry declined to comment further, citing the right to a fair trial.

“It’s really stupid,” said Jeffrey Zehnder, a forensic toxicologist who frequently testifies in court cases. Over 41 years, Zehnder said, he had never seen a prosecution for driving under the influence of caffeine.

“If that’s the case, then they better come and arrest me,” he joked.

Zehnder was informed about the case by Barrett, but has not been contracted to testify on either side.

California vehicle code defines a “drug” as any substance besides alcohol that could affect a person in a manner that would “impair, to an appreciable degree” his ability to drive normally.

Making that case with caffeine would be difficult, Zehnder said, because the prosecutor would have to show that impaired driving was specifically caused by the caffeine and not any other circumstances.

“There are no studies that demonstrate that driving is impaired by caffeine, and they don’t do the studies, because no one cares about caffeine,” he said.

As for Schwab, he just wants this ordeal to be over. In a statement provided to the Guardian by his attorney, he said his reputation had been damaged.

“No one believed me that I only had caffeine in my system until I showed them the lab results,” he said. “I want the charges to be dismissed and my name to be cleared.”

It’s interesting that the charges weren’t filed until 10 months later, which means they knew that the tests came back showing no drugs in his system. Sounds like somebody was hoping that Schwab would just accept some sort of plea deal rather than deal with the ridiculous charge, as most people do. It also shows that they don’t really have any evidence to support charges based on anything real, such as reckless driving, so they likely just rolled the dice hoping that he wouldn’t be able to afford a lawyer and they could just railroad him into pleading guilty to a lesser charge rather than dropping the obviously false DUI charge.

Michigan Cop Arrests Motorist for Suspended License then Performs Illegal Body Cavity Search

Officer Daniel Mack of the Allen Park Police Department, located in the Detroit metropolitan area, stopped a local man because he claimed he couldn’t see a temporary registration sticker on a minivan he had just bought for his wife. During the traffic stop Mack determined that Kevin Campbell had a suspended license. For that he was arrested, but that was just the beginning of Campbell’s mistreatment at the hands (no pun intended) of Officer Mack and at least two other Good Cops that were present at the time.

Even though a K-9 failed to indicate there were any drugs in his car and there was no other evidence to indicate he had drugs in his possession, Campbell was taken to jail. Once there, he was subjected to a body cavity search, which was both illegal and humiliating. According to Cambell’s lawyer David Robinson, any body cavity search would require both a warrant and that a medical professional perform it.

The illegal search/sexual assault also failed to find any evidence of drugs.

Via wxyz.com, the Detroit area ABC affiliate:

“You can’t do that,” says Kevin Campbell on video captured inside the police lock-up on June 7, 2016.

“Yes, I can. Yes, I can,” says Allen Park Police Officer Daniel Mack.

Campbell, and his attorney David Robinson, say Officer Mack performed an illegal a body cavity search on Campbell.

“Why you putting your fingers in my [expletive]??  Why you feeling my [expletive],” says Campbell in the video.

“Cause you got [something] tucked into your [expletive],” said Mack.

Campbell denies that, and Mack finds nothing during the search.

“It was very dehumanizing,” Campbell told 7 Investigator Heather Catallo.  “What he did was unconstitutional, violated my civil rights and violated me as a man period.”

The 32-year-old father from Detroit says he was terrified to find himself in that jail cell, and says he felt helpless.

“My fear switched over to me wondering ‘am I really going to make it out of here alive,’” said Campbell.

Campbell says this all started back in June, when Officer Mack pulled him over on the Southfield freeway near Rotunda.  Campbell says he had just bought a minivan for his wife, and it still had the temporary paper license plate taped to the window.

“He said he couldn’t see the license plate.  I thought that was very weird and odd that he couldn’t see a license plate by it being 7:00 in the afternoon,” said Campbell.

Campbell was driving with a suspended license, since he says he can’t afford to pay the fees needed to reinstate his license.   So Officer Mack patted him down, arrested him, and that’s where Campbell says things start to go wrong.

“He ran my name, he then got the K9 dog out; him and the K9 dog went searching through the car – didn’t find anything,” said Campbell.

Allen Park Police officers do not have scout car cameras or body cameras.  If Mack ran the K9 dog through the vehicle, he would have needed probable cause to look for drugs, and a search warrant.  There was no search warrant that the 7 Investigators or Campbell’s lawyer could find.

Campbell says the dog didn’t find anything, because there were no drugs.  Yet when they arrive at the Allen Park Police Department, Officer Mack is insisting that Campbell put something down his pants.

“Your pants [are] unzipped.  I’m gonna find it one way or another, alright?  So we can do this the easy way or the hard way,” said Mack on the video.  “What you got in your drawers,” said Mack.

After Campbell is put in the holding cell, Officer Mack appears to become irate.

“Drop ‘em,” said Mack.
“Drop what,” asked Campbell.
“Your drawers,” said Mack.
“You want me to get naked,” asked Campbell.
“Yeah, you’re getting naked.  You’re in a holding cell, you’re getting naked,” said Mack.

Then, Officer Mack pats Campbell down for a third time, unzips Campbell’s pants, and looks down his underwear.

Officer Mack is still insisting that Campbell needs to take his pants off.

“Drop your drawers,” said Mack.
“I’m not taking my underwear off,” said Campbell.

Then two other police officers enter the room and Campbell and his lawyer say Mack begins the body cavity search.

“Why you putting your fingers in my [expletive],” said Campbell  “Why you feeling my [expletive].”
“Cause you got it tucked into your [expletive],” said Mack.
“No,” yelled Campbell.
When Mack doesn’t appear to find anything, he says, “You can keep it.”
“Ain’t nothing to keep,” said Campbell.

“The other officers were being aggressive with their voices telling me “don’t move,” and be still, but it’s kind of hard to be still when you know you have someone grabbing your testicles through your underwear, and putting their fingers in places that another man shouldn’t be,” said Campbell.

“It is a body cavity search; it is the worst intrusion by any public officer anywhere on the face of the planet,” said Attorney David Robinson.

Not surprisingly, Campbell has now filed a federal lawsuit against the city of Allen Park Police and Officer Mack for his actions that night. In addition the lack of a warrant and licensed medical professional, Ofc. Mack also failed to mention the cavity search in his police report. Documentation of any body cavity search conducted is another legal requirement.

Another less than shocking aspect of this story is that Officer Mack has a history of misconduct. Just last year, he was involved in a scandal in which he wrongfully arrested a completely innocent man. In that case, he charged a man named Arthur W. Chapman for reckless driving. After a bystander who had filmed the incident came forward, it was revealed that Chapman was merely driving a car similar to the person Mack had intended to arrest.

Cyril Oklahoma Police Officer Committed Perjury and Destroyed Evidence to Protect a Friend

cyril_ok_police_perjuryThe following post was shared with  NVCopBlock by Kid Clint, via the NVCopBlock.org Submissions Page.

Date of Incident: July 08, 2015
Officers Involved: Officer Loren Daniel Cole, Chief Chris Wagstaff
Department Involved: Cyril Police Department
Department Address: 202 W Main Street, P.O. Box 448 Cyril, Oklahoma 73029
Phone No.: (580) 464-2216
District Attorney: Jason Hicks
Stephens County Courthouse
Address: 101 South 11th street, Room 303 Duncan, Oklahoma 73533
Phone No.: (580) 255-8726
Fax No.: (580) 255-1889

According to a report, Loren Daniel Cole of Marlow, was working as a Cyril police officer on July 8, 2015 when he and other officers were called to investigate an assault at a home in Cyril. According to an affidavit written by Cole, no drugs were found in the house. However, there were some photographs taken at the time. One set of photographs showed marijuana on a table, and another set showed no marijuana on a table.

Officer Cole was accused of removing the marijuana from the scene, and tossing it in a trash can near the Cyril Police Department, then making false statements on the affidavit that no drugs were found at the residence.

After investigators noticed the photographs, they questioned Officer Cole. Cole then admitted to discovering marijuana at the original scene, but not mentioning it on the affidavit.

According to Caddo County District Attorney Jason Hicks, “We have two affidavits that are polar opposites. In Oklahoma, under statute, that’s perjury. We look at two sworn documents and one of them says, ‘X,’ and the other one says, ‘Y.’ It’s a pretty clear-cut case of perjury.”

Officer Cole admitted to changing the police report and disposing of the evidence. Cole says Chief of Police Chris Wagstaff instructed him to do so to protect the subject of the investigation from criminal charges who happened to be an EMT. Chief Wagstaff was apparently concerned that voices carry.

However, Wagstaff told investigators that he directed Officer Cole to “secure the evidence, not destroy it.”

If Chief Wagstaff did instruct officer Cole to destroy the evidence, then this is a case of not only perjury, but of corruption!

According to the Oklahoma State Statute:

  • Destruction of evidence is a misdemeanor under 21 O.S. § 454.
  • Perjury is defined in 21 O.S. § 491:
  • Whoever, in a trial, hearing, investigation, deposition, certification or declaration, in which the making or subscribing of a statement is required or authorized by law, makes or subscribes a statement under oath, affirmation or other legally binding assertion that the statement is true, when in fact the witness or declarant does not believe that the statement is true or knows that it is not true or intends thereby to avoid or obstruct the ascertainment of the truth, is guilty of perjury. It shall be a defense to the charge of perjury as defined in this section that the statement is true.
  • According to 21 O.S. § 500, perjury is a felony punishable by up to 20 years in prison, depending on the specific details of the crime:
    • When committed on the trial of an indictment for felony, by imprisonment not less than two (2) years nor more than twenty (20) years;
    • When committed on any other trial proceeding in a court of justice, by imprisonment for not less than (1) year nor more than ten (10) years; and
    • In all other cases by imprisonment not more than (5) years

– Kid Clint

Cyril Oklahoma Police Officer Accused of Perjury and Destroying Evidence to Cover for a Friend

The following post was shared with the CopBlock Network by Kid Clint, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

Date of Incident: July 08, 2015
Officers Involved: Officer Loren Daniel Cole, Chief Chris Wagstaff
Department Involved: Cyril Police Department
Department Address: 202 W Main Street, P.O. Box 448 Cyril, Oklahoma 73029
Phone No.: (580) 464-2216
District Attorney: Jason Hicks
Stephens County Courthouse
Address: 101 South 11th street, Room 303 Duncan, Oklahoma 73533
Phone No.: (580) 255-8726
Fax No.: (580) 255-1889

According to a report, Loren Daniel Cole of Marlow, was working as a Cyril police officer on July 8, 2015 when he and other officers were called to investigate an assault at a home in Cyril. According to an affidavit written by Cole, no drugs were found in the house. However, there were some photographs taken at the time. One set of photographs showed marijuana on a table, and another set showed no marijuana on a table.

Officer Cole was accused of removing the marijuana from the scene, and tossing it in a trash can near the Cyril Police Department, then making false statements on the affidavit that no drugs were found at the residence.

After investigators noticed the photographs, they questioned Officer Cole. Cole then admitted to discovering marijuana at the original scene, but not mentioning it on the affidavit.

According to Caddo County District Attorney Jason Hicks, “We have two affidavits that are polar opposites. In Oklahoma, under statute, that’s perjury. We look at two sworn documents and one of them says, ‘X,’ and the other one says, ‘Y.’ It’s a pretty clear-cut case of perjury.”

Officer Cole admitted to changing the police report and disposing of the evidence. Cole says Chief of Police Chris Wagstaff instructed him to do so to protect the subject of the investigation from criminal charges who happened to be an EMT. Chief Wagstaff was apparently concerned that voices carry.

However, Wagstaff told investigators that he directed Officer Cole to “secure the evidence, not destroy it.”

If Chief Wagstaff did instruct officer Cole to destroy the evidence, then this is a case of not only perjury, but of corruption!

According to the Oklahoma State Statute:

  • Destruction of evidence is a misdemeanor under 21 O.S. § 454.
  • Perjury is defined in 21 O.S. § 491:
  • Whoever, in a trial, hearing, investigation, deposition, certification or declaration, in which the making or subscribing of a statement is required or authorized by law, makes or subscribes a statement under oath, affirmation or other legally binding assertion that the statement is true, when in fact the witness or declarant does not believe that the statement is true or knows that it is not true or intends thereby to avoid or obstruct the ascertainment of the truth, is guilty of perjury. It shall be a defense to the charge of perjury as defined in this section that the statement is true.
  • According to 21 O.S. § 500, perjury is a felony punishable by up to 20 years in prison, depending on the specific details of the crime:
    • When committed on the trial of an indictment for felony, by imprisonment not less than two (2) years nor more than twenty (20) years;
    • When committed on any other trial proceeding in a court of justice, by imprisonment for not less than (1) year nor more than ten (10) years; and
    • In all other cases by imprisonment not more than (5) years

– Kid Clint

Yet Another Cop Caught Stealing Drugs From the Prescription Drop Box in Ventura, California

Senior Deputy Matthew Volpe of the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office is just the latest in a string of cops caught “sampling the goods” from a police department prescription drop box. The drop boxes are supposed to represent a way for citizens to turn over old or unneeded prescription drugs for proper disposal that eliminates contamination of water supplies or other environmental concerns. It also eliminates the threat of heavily armed, violent people catching them with them after the prescription has expired and assaulting and/or kidnapping them because they no longer have permission from the State to put that particular substance in their body.

Instead, in increasingly numerous instances they’ve become a sort of bargain bin for cops to augment their own supply of drugs to satisfy their habit in between arresting people for drug offenses and other victimless crimes or generating revenue. In fact, just yesterday I posted about the sheriff of Sandusky, Ohio having been indicted for cruising around illegally collecting the contents of drug drop boxes throughout several departments within Sandusky County. Sheriff Kyle Overmyer is now facing 43 charges, including 38 felonies, for his habit of “grazing” for free drugs and also for all the money he stole.

Deputy Volpe wasn’t quite as prolific as Sheriff Overmyer, but he had a good run and he would have gotten away without too, if not for a meddling employee (actually) in charge of emptying the drop box at the sheriff’s office.

Via the Ventura County Star:

Investigators were alerted in early May after a sheriff’s employee who regularly empties the disposal bin noticed a disparity in the amount of medication compared to a day earlier, the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office said.

The employee alerted investigators, who then looked at surveillance footage from the East Valley station’s lobby on Olsen Road, where the bin was located. Investigators said they saw someone wearing a sheriff’s office uniform use a key to unlock the bottom of the bin and remove items. They identified the person on camera as Volpe, who was assigned to the Thousand Oaks police motor unit, officials said.

Investigators turned over evidence to the District Attorney’s Office for review and consideration of filing criminal charges of embezzlement and possession of a controlled substance, officials said.

Volpe was placed on administrative leave in May.

Investigators said additional surveillance footage shows Volpe removed items from the bin five other times between April 12 and May 6.

Investigators said they searched Volpe’s home, his work locker and assigned sheriff’s motorcycle. They said they found prescription medication that was not prescribed to Volpe inside a compartment of the motorcycle.

Looks like the Good Cops at the VCSO have already started setting him up with the obligatory Policeman’s Discount, though. In spite of being caught on camera at least six times stealing from the drop box and being caught with the actual drugs on his motorcycle, he’s been charged with just two misdemeanor possession counts and another misdemeanor petty theft charge.

After the Ventura County District Attorney’s Office sets him up with a plea bargain, he’ll likely be facing a stiff fine and a couple days of suspension at the end of the paid vacation he’s currently on before he’s allowed to get back out there and arrest people for drug crimes again.