Tag Archives: video evidence

LVMPD Police Arrive 90 Minutes After Home Invasion 911 Call; Cite Homeowner Instead of Attackers

The following post was shared with Nevada Cop Block by Mariah Clanton, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

Mariah, a Las Vegas resident, states that not only did officers from the LVMPD respond extremely slowly to a home invasion in which she was assaulted, but that once they did arrive instead of intervening on her behalf against those attackers they actually issued citations against her for defending herself within her own home.

Date of Incident: July 27, 2016
Officers Involved: Officer J. Weeks and three other unidentified officers
Department Involved: Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD)
Department Facebook Page: LVMPD
Department Phone No.: (702) 828-3347
Department Address: 1851 Stella Lake Street, Las Vegas, Nevada 89106

There was an invasion of my home, and I was attacked in front of my children. My ten year old child hid in the bathroom and made videos (see video embedded below) trying to describe what was happening, give descriptions of the people at our house, and upload them in the hopes someone would see them and come to help us.

Also, 911 was called on speakerphone while the attacker was in my home and the dispatcher was told I was being assaulted and needed immediate help.

My older children had to pick my toddler up from the ground, where the attacker knocked him, witnessed the attack, and were told to get away by me. They hid in the bathroom for over 90 minutes. I was left to force the attacker out of my home and was injured.

When police arrived they refused to document injuries, refused to speak to or take statements from my family, or to view the multiple videos of the incident showing these strangers on my property. They engaged immediately with my attackers, who were waiting at the curb to tell their story, while I stayed behind locked doors with my children.

I was cited for battery, and for trespass when I was in my home the entire time, and had video proof. I refused to sign the citations, and had to refuse repeatedly. This was not only a completely unacceptable amount of time to wait for response to a violent crime, the officers failed to do their duty in any way.

I had to leave my home in an ambulance and had Officer J. Weeks hold them up so he could claim I have a felony warrant that my lawyer verified I absolutely do not. I was then followed by my attackers, they were waiting when I was discharged from the ER. I had to sneak past them (they had luckily fallen asleep). In spite of my ambulance driver reporting the stalking/menacing, nothing was done. I not only received no assistance from those officers, I was issued citations for defending myself and my children.

– Mariah Clanton

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NYPD Costs Taxpayers Over $66 Million Dollars After Six People Wrongfully Imprisoned For Murder

Four men and one woman have accepted a settlement offer after being released for a 1995 murder they didn’t commit. Each of them had served 18 years in prison due to “unethical tactics” by NYPD detectives, including coaching witnesses, breaking the rules for photo lineups, and withholding video evidence that would have contradicted a major witness.

The “Soundview Five” will receive $40 million dollars collectively from New York taxpayers in this settlement. Previously, they had received $19.45 million in another settlement over the wrongful convictions. In addition, the estate of a sixth person also falsely convicted, who has since died, received a $6.89 million settlement. All told, the totals for all three settlements equal $66.34 million that the NYPD will be forcing the citizens of New York State to pay.

Via the New York Daily News:

The city settled lawsuits Thursday brought by five wrongly convicted people who spent nearly two decades in prison, agreeing to pay out $40 million — one of the largest such amounts in city history.

The four men and one woman were wrongly identified as the killers in two 1995 murders, at least one of which was linked to a vicious gang in the Soundview section of the Bronx called “Sex Money Murder.”

The quintet was dubbed the “Soundview Five,” a reference to the high-profile Central Park Five who settled their lawsuits with the city for $41 million in 2014, after being wrong convicted of beating and raping a jogger in 1989.

The Soundview Five were released in 2012 and 2013 after new evidence surfaced that the real killers had confessed to one of the murders. Before Thursday’s agreement, they had previously settled with the state in the Court of Claims for a separate $19.45 million.

Earl Ward of Emery Celli Brinckerhoff & Abady and Julia Kuan of Romano & Kuan, the lawyers for Perez and Michael Cosme, another member of the quintet, issued a joint statement Thursday.

“So many lives were ruined by the shoddy, flawed, and unconstitutional police work that no amount of money could ever compensate our clients for their lost years,” the statement said. “But the settlement reaffirms what they have been saying for 20 years — ‘We are Innocent!’ ”

Perez, Cosme, Cathy Watkins, Eric Glisson and Devon Ayers were just starting their lives when they were arrested by police for the murders of a cab driver and a Federal Express executive in the Bronx in 1995.

Glisson, Vasquez, Ayers and Cosme knew each other from the neighborhood, but Perez and Watkins didn’t know any of them. Watkins didn’t even live in the Bronx.

Cops used unethical tactics to build their case against the quintet, including coaching witnesses on what to say and violating rules for photo lineups, Ward said. He said police also withheld a security video that would have undermined a key witness’s testimony.

“These suits were brought by people who together spent nearly one hundred years in prison, whose convictions were vacated by the Court after reviews by federal and local prosecutors,” a city Law Department spokesman said. “The parties have agreed to resolve these longstanding and complex cases through settlements we believe are fair and in the best interests of the city.”

All five were convicted and got life sentences, but they never gave up trying to get someone to listen to their pleas of innocence. They wrote letter after letter after letter to everyone they could think of.

In 2012, the convictions began to collapse when Glisson wrote a letter to an investigator with the U.S. Attorney’s office. That investigator, John O’Malley, read the letter and recalled that when two of the gang members agreed to cooperate years earlier, they admitted to killing the cabbie.

“He told us that when he read the letter, it sent shivers up his spine because he realized two people he had spoken to years earlier had confessed to the crime,” Ward said.

O’Malley provided an affidavit to the court, and the Bronx District Attorney eventually agreed not to oppose their release. The quintet then filed suit.

Perez, who was knifed in prison in 2003, said he clung to his faith to survive the long ordeal.

“I cried every day for 18 years,” he said. “You have that faith that someday you will be free. One day.”

Of course, there’s nothing in the article about the punishment the cops and prosecutors who ruined these six people’s lives will (not) be receiving for the “shoddy, flawed, and unconstitutional police work” that sent them to prison for 18 years each, even though they were completely innocent. Not surprisingly, the taxpayers will be the only ones being punished for that.

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Greensboro North Carolina Police Department Recruitment Video

This video and the following post were shared with the CopBlock Network by the “Greensboro Police Public Abuse” Facebook page, by way of the Cop Block Press Passes Facebook page. (If you have a video and/or content for a post that you would like to share you can do so via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.)

In the “about” section of their Facebook page those behind the GPPA state:

“We are here to end the abuse and corruption of the Greensboro Police Dept. There is a great deal of video evidence showing their brutal and abusive methods.”

It’s very obvious in watching the video that it’s a parody and not a video genuinely created by the Greensboro Police Department with the intent of recruiting new Revenue Generators. However, as the YouTube description implies, this is more a case of the fact that the cops generally know enough not to come right out and admit what they do, than it not actually being based on the reality of what the police do and why some people are attracted to the police force.

Among other things, the video points out the secretive and (intentionally) ineffective internal affairs process that will allow officers to “beat the hell out of someone” (especially minorities) and then cover it up by trumping up charges against the victim without any fear of repercussions.  The infamous “Greensboro Massacre” where members of the KKK and the American Nazi Party shot five people at an anti-Klan march and in which a court ruled law enforcement acted in collusion with the racist hate groups is also used as an example of the extra rights recruits can look forward to upon graduation from the academy.

The video also points out the fallacy of the idea that police body cameras are the solution to police abuses. The case of Officer Timothy Bloch is pointed to as an example of easily all the Good Cops “investigating” each other can make that evidence disappear never to be seen by the public (unless of course it supports their official story).

The video concludes by calling for a citizen’s review board, which is being advocated for in Greensboro by the “Beloved Community Center.” In theory, that’s a good idea provided that it would be a true citizen run board with actual power to compel police officials to act (which seems to be the intent of their proposal). However, neither one of those characteristics tend to be a part of the in name only citizen’s oversight boards that more often act as a distraction from the continued corruption of the police departments they “oversee.”

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