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Las Vegas Sheriff Joe Lombardo (and the Mandalay Bay) Want People to Just “Forget That (Mass Shooting) and Move On”

Sheriff Joe Lombardo LVMPD Las Vegas Shooting

LVMPD Sheriff Joe Lombardo thinks it’s important that everyone just “move on and forget about” the October 1st shooting by Stephen Paddock at the Mandalay Bay on the Las Vegas Strip.

Over the MLK day weekend, Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo stated:

“The frustrating thing for me as the head of the law enforcement is the keyboard bandits the guys who sit at their couches at their home and Monday morning quarterback everything you do and that are smarter than you. The pressure that we are put under to do the right thing and I believe we did the right thing and I am not hiding anything from anybody. You know what I know.

The reason why I say that it is just as important for you to be comfortable living here and have an understanding to prevent another event from taking place, for you to know what exactly happened. So, you know what exactly happened so far. I anticipate a press conference here in about a week to give you more information and to provide the media with more information associated with that event.

But there will not be a keystone or an important piece associated with Mr. Paddock and why he did what he did, so it’s important for us to forget that and move on and be resilient.”  – Via at the Baltimore Post Examiner

Overlooking the Freudian slip of Lombardo admitting that the “keyboard bandits” he’s so frustrated with are smarter than him, it is very much important that Las Vegas residents (and everyone else) know what exactly happened that day and why it happened the way it did. Unfortunately, if anything Lombardo and the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department have been doing the opposite of that important thing.

What few things they have released publicly have been incomplete on a basic, unnecessary level and in several major instances just plain inaccurate.  And in many cases these aren’t the kind of inaccuracies that have resulted from additional information being discovered during the course of an investigation. Nor are they things being withheld because public disclosure would compromise the investigation.

In fact, oftentimes these have been revisions or disclosures forced upon Lombardo and the LVMPD by those frustrating Keyboard Bandits and their inconvenient facts. Among other things, they were forced to admit that they lied about or withheld information on when Paddock checked in to the Mandalay Bay, the fact a Metro cop had fired his weapon inside the room where he had stayed, and the ever-shifting timeline of when the MGM security guard and Metro officers reached the 32nd floor and timing of the shooting in relation to that.

Some of the motives behind the dishonesty and lack of transparency for those particular inconsistencies are fairly easy to figure out. Mostly, it boils down to trying to reduce liability for the Mandalay Bay and Metro itself and eliminate criticism of their lack of a response. If Paddock checked in right before the shooting, then people are less likely to question why no-one saw him do anything suspicious that would point to his intentions in the days prior.

Similarly, if the shooting began at the same time as security guard Jesus Campos had been shot, then people are less likely to question why Mandalay Bay security didn’t respond immediately. If it ended shortly after, people are less likely to ask why the “heroic” Metro police officers stood around in the hallway for over an hour without going into the room where they knew someone had just fired hundreds of bullets into a crowd of unsuspecting people and presumably didn’t know whether he would start shooting again.

Note: If you have videos, stories, upcoming events/protests, or personal interactions with the police (and/or “justice” system) that you would like to share, send them to us and we will do everything we can to bring it to the attention of the world. In addition, you can visit the Nevada Cop Block resources section for information and links to the rights of citizens when dealing with police, during which you should always be filming.

Las Vegas casinos are notorious for the amount of video cameras they have in and around them and for the vigilance with which security monitors those cameras. Except for the inside of the hotel rooms and other private areas such as bathrooms, you can’t walk two feet inside one without it being recorded. At least some of the police had body cameras. And Paddock himself had cameras set up both in the hallway and inside his room.

Yet there’s no video of the guard, Jesus Campos, being shot or the police in the hallway that day, no video of Paddock bringing his arsenal of weapons and ammunition from his car in the garage through the check-in area and to the room, no video of him smashing those giant reinforced windows out prior to the shooting. There’s also no video of him barricading the door to the stairwell, setting up cameras in the hallway, or disabling the farm alarms just prior to firing on the crowd.

Lombardo was in a big hurry almost before the sound of gunfire had faded away to assure everyone that only one person was responsible for this shooting. He also was in a rush to make sure everyone knew that that one person was dead and there was no terrorist connection. Even before there was time enough to confirm whether that was true, it was important for them to assure tourists didn’t get scared off by the idea of another incident like this happening in the future.

The problem is that the inconsistencies, altered timelines, and exposed lies that those efforts to keep information from the public have spawned has done nothing but fuel those same fears and mistrust toward the official story. Sheriff Lombardo and the MGM corporation (along with the rest of Las Vegas’ casino industry) would like for everyone to just “forget that and move on.”

It’s important that we don’t until we get some real answers.

The LVMPD’s Shifting Timeline for the Oct. 1st Las Vegas Mass Shooting

What Happened in Vegas,” the award winning documentary by Ramsey Denison, is currently available on DVD as well as via Video On Demand (VOD). In addition to the issues and questions surrounding the Route 91 Festival shooting already mentioned, the movie also exposes some of the many instances of corruption and police brutality within the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department.

As has been detailed numerous times here at NVCopBlock.org, What Happened in Vegas primarily details the extremely controversial killings of Trevon Cole, Erik Scott, Stanley Gibson, and Tashii Farmer-Brown by Las Vegas police and the cover ups that followed. Several other instances of violent, racist, and/or outright criminal acts by members of the LVMPD are also featured to illustrate the overall systemic corruption within the department.

“What Happened in Vegas” Trailer

“What Happened in Vegas” Filmmaker Intro

Posts Related to What Happened in Vegas

Miami Police Officer Eric Dominguez Delays Medical Treatment For; Then Extorts Accident Victim

The following post was shared with the Cop Block Network by Allie Goldman, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. It details how she was “protected and served” by Officer Eric Dominguez of the Miami Beach Police Department after she suffered a broken leg in an accident while riding a rented scooter during a visit to Miami earlier this year.

Allie states that, instead of helping her get necessary medical treatment for her injury or even simply allowing her to go to the hospital and seek that treatment herself, Officer Dominguez insisted on delaying that treatment by forcing her to provide a driver’s license (which often isn’t required for scooters).

Even after one of her friends retrieved the license, Officer Dominguez then extorted money from her based on an accident that caused no injury or damage to anyone except Allie herself and potentially the scooter for which Allie was already liable for.

Date of Incident: February 29, 2016
Officer Involved: Officer Eric Dominguez
Department Involved: Miami Beach Police Department
Contact Phone Number: (305) 673-7900
Facebook Page: Miami Beach PD Facebook Page
Twitter Account: @MiamiBeachPD

I was visiting Miami this past February for my birthday. Some friends and I rented those motorized scooters. On our last day there, I ran into a curb and fell off of the scooter. I did not injure anyone or anything (including the scooter) but the fall resulted in me having a severely broken leg.

A witness decided to call 911 when they saw me in pain. Officer Eric Dominguez responded. He was immediately very rude. I did not have my physical ID on me, so he kept accusing me of not really having a license. I was sitting there sobbing in pain wanting to leave and go to the hospital when I was told by him that he would arrest me if I left.

I had one of my friends drive back to our hotel to get my ID and bring it back to him. The officer was clearly not taking my injury seriously and even asked me to try to walk (which my doctors told me probably caused more damage). When my friend came back with my ID thirty minutes later, he acknowledged that I in fact did have a driver’s license and told me I could finally go to the hospital. I was upset about my treatment from the officer, but decided to let it go.

Two months later, I am now receiving numerous letters from Miami-Dade Clerk of Courts for the FOUR traffic citations Officer Dominguez gave me. First off, I was never told I was being cited with ANYTHING. I fell off of a scooter, I was unaware that was a crime! I am being cited with failure to provide insurance – he never asked for my insurance even though the scooter rental was in fact insured. I am being cited with reckless driving – the officer did not witness me driving. I am being charged with failure to provide a driver’s license – I had one at the time of the incident, and he made me wait to go to the hospital just so he could see it for himself. I am not even sure what the other citation even means.

I am shocked and disgusted that someone who is supposed to protect and serve would respond to an injured tourist and try to turn their life upside down. It was an ACCIDENT that did not injure anyone or anything besides myself.

So after dealing with the trauma of having a broken leg and having to have multiple surgeries, I now have $800 in traffic tickets, a bench warrant in Miami, and a suspended license where I live in Ohio. This incident makes Miami Beach PD look bad and has ruined my trust in the police in general! It definitely has tainted my many great memories in Miami.

– Allie Goldman

It’s actually rather ironic that Officer Dominguez would give anyone a ticket for reckless driving, BTW. Dominguez in fact was suspended from the Miami Beach Police Department in 2012 for (wait for it) speeding and driving recklessly in his patrol car on a occupied beach. In that incident, for which he was restricted from driving a department vehicle for two years and suspended a week, his vehicle actually went airborne due to the speed and lack of traction in the sand. (The video of that Heroic Act by Dominguez is embedded below.)

Prior to that, Dominguez nearly killed four motorcyclists in a crash, including another police officer, while (you guessed it) speeding and driving recklessly in a department issued vehicle in 2010. Then he lied and tried to tell highway patrol officers that responded that he was on duty and responding to a call, when he was actually off-duty at the time. According to the Miami New Times, there’s no evidence in his personnel file that Ofc. Dominguez was punished in any way for this incident. Taxpayers on the other hand, were forced to pay “tens of thousands” to his victims.

Just for good measure, he also has been caught committing fraud by abusing sick time on four different occasions since 2008. The fact that Officer Dominguez is in a position to give tickets to anyone at this point says a lot about the Miami Beach Police Department and the myth of “accountability” among all the Heroic Police Officers in general, not just the Good Cops in Florida.

LVMPD Sued By Man Shown on Video Being Attacked by Police at Hard Rock Casino

Ian Tuuamalemalo, a man who was visiting Las Vegas from Southern California, has filed a police brutality lawsuit over an incident in which he was violently attacked by a group of officers from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department. Tuuamalemalo had been attending a reggae concert at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in January of 2014 when the assault occurred.

Although it was claimed in the police report that Tuuamalemalo was acting aggressively, he was actually walking away from the officers when he was grabbed from behind and then punched in the face by one of the (as yet unidentified) officers. The rest of the officers then jumped on him and he appears to have been knocked unconscious before being carried away. Charges against him were later dropped.

The beating of Tuuamalemalo is shown on a surveillance video (embedded below) from the casino. Cal Potter, a local civil rights attorney who is representing Tuuamalemalo, has described the altercation as “an organized riot on the part of the police.” In addition, Potter states that the LVMPD ruled that a “policy violation” had been committed, although no details of what exactly that violation was or by whom it was committed had been provided.

Via KLASTV – 8 News Now:

“They could have killed me,” he said.

The video shows him being tugged on his shirt, followed by what may be a punch. He is shown being taken to the ground by police, restrained and carried out. Tuuamalemalo appears to be passed out.

“I don’t like being helpless,” he said.

The incident occurred January 26, 2014. The 34-year-old man says he was visiting from California for a reggae show at the Hard Rock, when he had a run-in with Metro Police…

They claim this is excessive use of force by police. Since there is no audio, it is unclear how this started and what was said between police and Tuuamalemalo.

A Metro report describes him as aggressive and refers to his size. He says, at the time, he was nearly 380 pounds, and stands 6’1”.

He says he was walking away, when someone tugged his shirt.

“I just remembered I turned around. Right when I turned around, that’s when I seen the officer. He just had a, just a full swing, just takes one to my face,” he said.

“There is no excuse for that,” Potter added.

Potter says he’s concerned about the tactics used to restrain his client.

“In a perfect world, the United States Attorney’s Office would pick up this case, and prosecute it and indict the officers that were involved,” he said.

Tuuamalemalo was arrested for resisting a public officer and destroying property at the Hard Rock. The charges were later dropped.

He says he complained to Metro Police. He received letter (sic) in January 2015 – approximately a year after the incident – stating a policy violation was found to be sustained. It does not state, however, what that violation is and who may have been held accountable.

“There is a blue wall of silence that we are all aware that work in the police misconduct business and civil rights violations,” Potter said…

Potter says he believes the person who may have thrown a punch is a Metro Police sergeant, but 8 News NOW could not confirm that.

Obviously, we all know this isn’t a “perfect world,” where cops are actually held accountable for their actions. That is certainly not the case for Las Vegas area police departments, where cops are free to do pretty much anything they want without any realistic fear of repercussions. He’s quite right that they could have killed him (on video) and easily gotten away with it.