Tag Archives: #ThinBlueLies

Update: Michael Slager Now Also Facing Federal Charges And Potentially Death Penalty

Former Officer Michael Slager, the South Carolina cop who was caught on film murdering Walter Scott from behind as he ran away, was also indicted two weeks ago by a federal grand jury. The new federal charges are in addition to the state-level charges he already faces for the shooting of Scott. Although it is incredibly unlikely to happen or even be sought, these charges also bring with them the possibility of a death penalty sentence should Slager be convicted.

Via NBCnews.com:

Michael Slager, who was fired by the North Charleston Police Department after last year’s killing of Walter Scott, was indicted on charges of violating civil rights laws, using a firearm in committing a crime of violence, and obstructing justice in the fatal shooting of an unarmed man.

“This is historic,” the Scott family’s lawyer, Chris Stewart, said afterward. “What happened today is that the federal government says it stops now. Police brutality stops now.”

Slager is white. Scott was black. And the message sent by the grand jury is not aimed at the good cops, Stewart said.

“This is a message to the ones who abuse people in this country,” he said.

In the aftermath of Scott’s death, police departments in South Carolina and across the U.S. are adopting body cameras and embracing reform, Stewart said.

“Walter Scott did not die in vain.” he said.

“It’s a bittersweet day,” added Scott’s brother, Anthony. “If it wasn’t for that video camera…. we would not be here today.”

Walter Scott North Charleston MurderScott’s mother, Judy, said she thanks God that her son “was the one that was used to pull the cover off of all the violence.”

“I’m happy for that, but I’m sad because my son is gone,” she said. “I pray that other mothers won’t go through what I have been going through.”

Slager, according to the indictment, misled investigators by falsely claiming that Scott was coming at him with a Taser when he fired his gun.

“In truth … Slager repeatedly fired his weapon at Scott when Scott was running away from him,” the indictment reads.

Slager fired eight times at Scott, who was 50 and whose deadly encounter with the cop began after a traffic stop.

One of the charges filed against Slager — depriving someone of their civil rights under color of law — carries a maximum penalty of death. In the federal system, a decision about whether to actually seek the death penalty will come later.

Personally, I wish I could share in the enthusiasm that the family’s lawyer feels for this. It’s certainly good that another set of charges are being filed, therefore making it that much less likely that Slager will be given the Home Field Advantage cops invariably receive and walk free or at least receive the typical Policeman’s Discount and get nothing but a slap on the wrist and a stern talking to. However, history has yet to prove that the Federal Government or any other level of statist governance is prepared to say, “it stops now. Police brutality stops now.”

Keep those cameras rolling.

Chicago City Officials Have Acknowledged The Thin Blue Line; Will Other Cities Join Them?

The following post was shared with the CopBlock Network by James McLynas, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. He invites those reading along at home to join him in a bit of a social experiment to see if police across the country will join (some) city officials in Chicago in pulling back the curtain and acknowledging one of the the worst kept secrets in history.

That incredibly obvious subject of cognitive dissonance is that all those Good Cops lie and cover up for the cops they claim are just a few Bad Apples abusing and outright murdering citizens on a daily basis.

Now that Chicago government officials have admitted that a Code of Silence exists among the police there, will the police in your own city be willing to do so, as well?

Recent events in Chicago have resulted in public officials admitting for the first time that a police “Code of Silence” does exist. Even though everybody on the planet knows that cops lie for each other, falsify reports to keep each other out of trouble, and never report crimes committed by fellow officers, the admission is a first time a public official has actually told the truth and admitted it.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel stated:

“The problem is sometimes referred to as the ‘Thin Blue Line.’ Other times it is referred to as the ‘code of silence.’ It is the tendency to ignore, deny or, in some cases, cover up the bad actions of a colleague or colleagues.

No officer should be allowed to behave as if they are above the law just because they are responsible for upholding the law.

Permitting and protecting even the smallest acts of abuse by a tiny fraction of our officers leads to a culture where extreme acts of abuse are more likely, just like what happened to Laquan McDonald.

We all have grieved over young lives lost again and again to senseless violence in our city. Now more than ever we need good and effective policing.

But we cannot have effective policing if we turn a blind eye to the extreme misconduct we saw at its worst in the tragic case of Laquan McDonald.

We cannot ask citizens in crime-ravaged neighborhoods to break the code of silence if we continue to allow a code of silence to exist within our own police department.”

City lawyers even offered a written stipulation acknowledging the existence of a code of silence.

The police department in your area has the same disgusting, criminal (perjury) and corrupt code of silence as Chicago does. They ALL do! However, with Chicago’s admission, will your department admit it exists, or will they still continue the dirty lie?

Why not email them and ask them. You can use this handy template below.

Dear (Chief, Sheriff, etc.),

silence.jpg1With the recent admission by Chicago that the “Code of Silence” exists, you know, we know, everyone knows that there exists a similar “Code of Silence” within the (name of your local police department) with full acknowledgement and assistance of the State Attorney’s office in keeping it quiet. So, (Chief, Sheriff, etc.), are you man (or woman) enough and honorable enough to acknowledge the existence of a “Code of Silence” or “Thin Blue Line” within your department or are you going to remain a liar by your silence as your guilty profession demands?

Please post your responses (if any) here in the comments of this post for everyone’s amusement.

– James McLynas

Good luck with that, though. Not since pro wrestlers decided to finally go ahead and admit that it is actually fake has such an overt and easily disproved lie been clung to by so many people in spite of everyone knowing otherwise. The Thin Blue Lie will not be displaced by a mass email campaign alone as truly entertaining as some of those responses might actually be.

Police Wife Writes About the “Secret Epidemic” of Police Domestic Violence

This post was originally published at the “Ms. Magazine” blog in October of 2015 by and (who was married to a police officer for 20 years) under the original title “Police Wife: The Secret Epidemic of Police Domestic Violence.” (See below for their full biographies.)

Domestic violence takes place in up to a staggering 40 percent of law enforcement families, but police departments mostly ignore the problem or let it slide, write ex-police wife Susanna Hope and award-winning investigative journalist Alex Roslin in their new book, Police Wife: The Secret Epidemic of Police Domestic Violence. The following excerpt is adapted from their book, available on Amazon or as an eBook from their website, and is being published as part of the Ms. Blog’s Domestic Violence Awareness Month series.

According to Alex Roslin, “Police Wife” itself has more than 60 pages of appendices giving advice and resources to survivors, family and friends plus recommendations for advocates, police, governments, journalists and researchers.

In order to help survivors and others, they’ve made virtually all of the appendices available for free through their website. Here is the direct link to this extended free excerpt.

The propensity for police to abuse their wives, children, and other family members is, of course, no secret among people who read CopBlock.org. It’s rare that more than a few days go by without a report of a cop having committed domestic violence and several CopBlock Network Contributors have posted about the increased risk that entails marrying or having the bad fortune to be the child of a cop. Obviously, the habitual efforts of Good Cops to cover up the crimes of those Bad Apples, is also a large factor in its commonality.

Police Wife: The Secret Epidemic of Police Domestic Violence

In 2009, in Utica, New York, police Investigator Joseph Longo Jr. killed his estranged wife, Kristin Palumbo-Longo, stabbing her more than a dozen times in their home, then stabbed himself to death. One of the couple’s four children discovered the horrifying scene on coming home from school that afternoon.

Police Officer Cop BlockUtica’s then-Police Chief Daniel LaBella said the killing was completely unexpected—an incident “no one could have prevented or predicted.” But Kristin’s family filed a $100-million wrongful-death suit saying city and police officials didn’t do enough about Longo’s troubling behavior before the tragedy.

Kristin had contacted police at least five times in the weeks before she was murdered, saying she feared her husband might kill her and their kids, but police supervisors discouraged her from making reports or seeking a protection order, the lawsuit said. In a preliminary ruling, a federal judge agreed that the police actions may have “enhanced the danger to Kristin and amounted to deliberate indifference.” The city settled the suit in 2013, paying the couple’s children $2 million.

The murder wasn’t an isolated tragedy. It was unusual only because it was so public and so bloody. A staggering amount of domestic violence rages behind the walls of cops’ homes, while most police departments do little about it. In the vast majority of cases, cops who hurt a family member do so in utter secrecy, while their victims live in desperate isolation with very little hope of help. Research shows:

  • An astonishing 40 percent of cops acknowledged in one U.S. survey that they were violent with their spouse or children in the previous six months.
  • A second survey had remarkably similar results—40 percent of officers admitted there was violence in their relationship in the previous year. The abuse rate for cops is up to 15 times higher than among the public.
  • Police discipline is startlingly lax. The LAPD disciplines cops with a sustained domestic violence complaint less strictly than those who lie or get in an off-duty fight. In the Puerto Rico Police Department, 86 percent of cops remained on active duty even after two or more arrests for domestic violence.

It seems incredible that a crime wave of such magnitude and far-reaching social ramifications could be so unknown to the public and yet at the same time an open secret in a mostly indifferent law enforcement community. It is surely one of the most surreal crime epidemics ever—at once disavowed, generalized and virtually unchecked.

Aptly summing up the bizarre disconnect, retired Lieutenant Detective Mark Wynn of the Nashville Metropolitan Police Department in Tennessee told PBS in a 2013 story on the issue: “What’s amazing to me is we’re having this conversation at all. I mean, could you imagine us sitting here talking about this and saying, how do you feel about officers using crack before they go to work, or how do you feel about the officer who every once in a while just robs a bank, or every once in a while decides to go in and steal a car from a dealership? We wouldn’t have this conversation. Why is it that we’ve taken violence against women and separated that from other crimes?”

Domestic violence is bad enough for any woman to deal with. Shelters, many of them chronically underfunded, regularly turn away abused women because they’re full, while only about one in four incidents in the wider population ever get reported to police. Hundreds of U.S. communities have adopted “nuisance property” laws that encourage police to pressure landlords to evict tenants who repeatedly call 911 over domestic abuse, further dissuading victims from seeking help.

But abuse at home is far worse for the wife or girlfriend of a cop. Who will she call—911? What if a coworker or friend of her husband responds? Police officers are trained in the use of physical force and know how to hurt someone without leaving a trace. They have guns and often bring them home. And if a cop’s wife runs, where will she hide? He usually knows where the women’s shelters are. Some shelter staff admit they are powerless to protect an abused police spouse. Her abuser may have training and tools to track her web use, phone calls and travels to find out if she is researching how to get help or, if she has fled, where she went.

In the rare case where the woman works up the nerve to complain, the police department and justice system often victimize her again. She must take on the infamous blue wall of silence—the strict unwritten code of cops protecting each other in investigations. The police have a name for it—extending “professional courtesy.” In the words of Anthony Bouza, a one-time commander in the New York Police Department and former police chief of Minneapolis, “The Mafia never enforced its code of blood-sworn omerta with the ferocity, efficacy and enthusiasm the police bring to the Blue Code of Silence.”

It all adds up to the police having a de facto licence to abuse their spouses and children. And it’s a worldwide phenomenon that police families struggle with everywhere from Montreal to Los Angeles, Puerto Rico, the U.K., Australia and South Africa.

The torrent of abuse is virtually unknown to the public, but without realizing it, we all pay a steep price. Domestic violence is the single most common reason the public contacts the police in the U.S., accounting for up to 50 percent of all calls in some areas. Yet, a battered woman who calls 911 may have a two-in-five chance of an abuser coming to her door. Official investigations have found law enforcement departments that tolerate abuse in police homes also mishandle violence against women in other homes.

Abusive cops are also more prone to other forms of misconduct on the job—such as brutality against civilians and violence against fellow officers. We all pay as taxpayers when governments have to settle multi-million-dollar lawsuits with victims of police abuse or negligence. Police domestic violence also has close connections to a host of other problems—police killings of African Americans, sexual harassment of female drivers at traffic stops and women cops, and even more broadly, issues like growing social inequality and subjugation of Native Americans.

And police officers themselves are victims, too. Even though our society calls cops heroes, we give them little support to cope with the pressure of police work. A big part of the job is to wield power to control other people. As a result, policing attracts people who are good at controlling others or may have a craving for that kind of power—and then trains them to use their power better. Control is also the main driver of domestic violence. Is it a surprise then that so many cops are violent at home?

Support the Ms. Magazine Prison and Domestic Violence Shelter Program today and show women fleeing domestic violence that they’re not alone.

Susanna Hope (a pseudonym for security and privacy reasons) is a Canadian professional writer who was married for over 20 years to a police officer. She has two sons and two grandchildren.

Alex Roslin is an award-winning Canadian journalist who was president of the board of the Canadian Centre for Investigative Reporting. His investigative and writing awards include three Canadian Association of Journalists prizes for investigative reporting, a gold prize in the National Magazine Awards and nine nominations for CAJ awards and NMAs.

LVMPD Sued By Man Shown on Video Being Attacked by Police at Hard Rock Casino

Ian Tuuamalemalo, a man who was visiting Las Vegas from Southern California, has filed a police brutality lawsuit over an incident in which he was violently attacked by a group of officers from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department. Tuuamalemalo had been attending a reggae concert at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in January of 2014 when the assault occurred.

Although it was claimed in the police report that Tuuamalemalo was acting aggressively, he was actually walking away from the officers when he was grabbed from behind and then punched in the face by one of the (as yet unidentified) officers. The rest of the officers then jumped on him and he appears to have been knocked unconscious before being carried away. Charges against him were later dropped.

The beating of Tuuamalemalo is shown on a surveillance video (embedded below) from the casino. Cal Potter, a local civil rights attorney who is representing Tuuamalemalo, has described the altercation as “an organized riot on the part of the police.” In addition, Potter states that the LVMPD ruled that a “policy violation” had been committed, although no details of what exactly that violation was or by whom it was committed had been provided.

Via KLASTV – 8 News Now:

“They could have killed me,” he said.

The video shows him being tugged on his shirt, followed by what may be a punch. He is shown being taken to the ground by police, restrained and carried out. Tuuamalemalo appears to be passed out.

“I don’t like being helpless,” he said.

The incident occurred January 26, 2014. The 34-year-old man says he was visiting from California for a reggae show at the Hard Rock, when he had a run-in with Metro Police…

They claim this is excessive use of force by police. Since there is no audio, it is unclear how this started and what was said between police and Tuuamalemalo.

A Metro report describes him as aggressive and refers to his size. He says, at the time, he was nearly 380 pounds, and stands 6’1”.

He says he was walking away, when someone tugged his shirt.

“I just remembered I turned around. Right when I turned around, that’s when I seen the officer. He just had a, just a full swing, just takes one to my face,” he said.

“There is no excuse for that,” Potter added.

Potter says he’s concerned about the tactics used to restrain his client.

“In a perfect world, the United States Attorney’s Office would pick up this case, and prosecute it and indict the officers that were involved,” he said.

Tuuamalemalo was arrested for resisting a public officer and destroying property at the Hard Rock. The charges were later dropped.

He says he complained to Metro Police. He received letter (sic) in January 2015 – approximately a year after the incident – stating a policy violation was found to be sustained. It does not state, however, what that violation is and who may have been held accountable.

“There is a blue wall of silence that we are all aware that work in the police misconduct business and civil rights violations,” Potter said…

Potter says he believes the person who may have thrown a punch is a Metro Police sergeant, but 8 News NOW could not confirm that.

Obviously, we all know this isn’t a “perfect world,” where cops are actually held accountable for their actions. That is certainly not the case for Las Vegas area police departments, where cops are free to do pretty much anything they want without any realistic fear of repercussions. He’s quite right that they could have killed him (on video) and easily gotten away with it.

Drunk Hawaiian Cop Given Ride Home By Good Cops Was In Accident; Can’t Be Prosecuted Now

A link to the article quoted within this post was shared with the CopBlock Network anonymously by a reader, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

On February 8th, Sergeant Dennis Stone of the Honolulu Police Department was stopped in his department issued vehicle because his tire was flat and had deteriorated to the point that the rim was sparking. The (unnamed) officer that stopped him quickly determined that Sgt. Stone was drunk. Instead of being arrested and charged with DUI like anyone else that didn’t own a magical uniform and shiny badge would be, that officer gave him a “courtesy ride” home.

Soon after, other officers realized that the tax-payer financed vehicle that Stone had been driving drunk in (shortly after patrolling the streets for people driving while drunk) was damaged and had obviously been in an accident and not just randomly gotten a flat tire. Upon that discovery, a (Keystone Cops style)  frenzy ensued to get Sgt. Stone back to the scene of the crime before any potential victims showed up and exposed how “courteous” they are with their fellow Revenue Collectors.

Although it was eventually found that Stone had actually ran into a curb when he caused the damage to his tax-payer financed vehicle, it is now being reported this Bad Apple likely won’t be able to be prosecuted because of all the policies that the Good Cops didn’t follow when they gave him his “courtesy ride,” instead of arresting him for stuff that they (and he) routinely arrest others for.

And, of course Sgt. Stone has a prior violent crime arrest for beating up his daughter’s boyfriend. Not only did the Good Cops working in the Hawaiian police union get him his job back after that red flag, but he got a promotion shortly afterwards.

Via Hawaii News Now: (Emphasis added)

In a case that raises serious ethical questions, a Honolulu police sergeant was given a “courtesy” ride home by officers who suspected he was driving drunk, Hawaii News Now has learned.

He was subsequently rushed back to the scene, though, after officers discovered he might have been in an accident in his police-subsidized vehicle.

Here’s what happened: Sgt. Dennis Stone was pulled over January 31, just before 2 a.m. He was off-duty, but driving his HPD-subsidized Dodge Charger.

The officer who pulled him over wrote in his report that Stone was driving on Kahekili Highway with a tire that was so flat it was shredded and the rim was sparking.

The officer also wrote that Stone’s breath smelled of alcohol.

A second patrol officer gave Stone the “courtesy” ride to his home, about two miles away.

But just minutes later, the officers discovered the Dodge Charger had damage to the front fender. That’s when the same officer who drove Stone home rushed back to return him to the scene.

Jonathan Burge, a former HPD officer who’s now a criminal defense attorney, said the officers’ actions don’t just raise eyebrows. They could have put a serious investigation in jeopardy.

“At the time that they took him home and there was all this damage, they didn’t know whether or not somebody was hurt,” said Burge, who is not connected to the case. “For all they knew, he plowed into somebody two blocks away. That could have been disastrous.”

When Stone was brought back to the scene, an on-duty sergeant responded and noted that Stone’s breath smelled of alcohol and that his face and eyes were red.

He told Stone that he wanted to do a field sobriety test. Stone refused and was arrested.

Officers followed the marks on the highway from Stone’s tire rim about a half a mile — to the intersection of Kahekili Highway and Keaahala Road. They determined that Stone hit the concrete median there and left the scene.

What makes the episode worse is that law enforcement experts say the current case against Stone probably won’t hold up in court.

“The case itself is very weak,” said Aaron Hunger, a University of Hawaii criminology instructor. “I would doubt criminally the prosecutor’s office would see this as a case that would be winnable. A lot of policies were not followed.”

Stone is on restricted duty while criminal and internal investigations continue.

He is a 24-year veteran of the force, and he’s been in trouble before.

Three years ago, as a corporal, he was charged with assault for beating up his daughter’s boyfriend. He was fired, but got his job back a year later. Four months after that, he got promoted.

Obviously, the Thin Blue Line never goes on vacation, not even in Hawaii.

Hawaii News Now – KGMB and KHNL

Michael Slager is Attempting to Get Out on Bail Again (Plus Recent Related Developments)

Michael Slager Requests Bail Again

Michael Slager, the North Charleston, SC. cop who was caught murdering Walter Scott on video, has filed a new motion seeking an opportunity to post bail while he awaits trial. As reported here at CopBlock.org several months ago, Slager was refused bail by Circuit Judge Clifton Newman because he represents “an unreasonable danger to the community.”

After a motion they filed last week asking for his trial to begin in the spring was rejected, Slager’s lawyers cited  health problems, as well as anxiety and “concern about his fate,” he’s supposedly developed as a result of conditions in jail as reasons to justify him being released on bond.

Via the PostAndCourier.com:

Signed by defense lawyer Cameron Blazer of the Savage Law Firm, the filing mentioned that Slager has been a focus of a ramped-up surveillance program at the jail. While officials insist that the effort to intercept telephone calls and mail is meant to root out threats involving the high-profile inmate, the motion called it “completely divorced from any (jail) safety concern.” Jail officers routinely listen to Slager’s personal conversations, the filing stated.

cop-sc-620x342The lack of privacy has “acutely constrained” Slager’s ability to prepare for trial, Blazer wrote.

Slager also has fallen ill and lost 25 pounds, the attorneys said. Past filings noted that he has celiac disease, causing him to react negatively to gluten. He often faces the “unacceptable choice … of being either hungry or sick” because the jail cannot completely accommodate his diet, the motion stated.

So yeah, jail sucks, the food is horrible, and they spy on you while you’re there. As shocking as that is to pretty much nobody on the planet (and is in fact an issue that should be addressed), the fact that you were wearing a police uniform when you committed murder shouldn’t give you any extra consideration when complaining about that.

Member of Slager Investigation Team Fired Over Facebook Post

It was recently announced that one of the agents who investigated the murder of Walter Scott by Michael Slager was fired in August after posting on Facebook stating that prosecutor’s case in an unnamed homicide probe was “flawed.” Although, the case wasn’t  specified by name in State Law Enforcement Division (SLED) Special Agent Almon Brown’s post, the fact that it was made public in a filing of court papers by Slager’s attorney has led to speculation that he was referring to his case.

According to the PostAndCourier.com, this, along with other recent incidents, has created doubts about whether SLED can objectively perform  their duty to investigate police shootings as a neutral party:

The documentation has raised further questions about SLED’s ability to thoroughly and independently investigate police shootings in South Carolina. Most agencies in the state ask SLED to conduct probes into shootings involving their officers.

A Post and Courier analysis earlier this year, titled “Shots Fired,” found that SLED often left key questions unanswered and failed to thoroughly probe the background of officers who pull the trigger. Last month, [SLED Chief Mark] Keel said police should start looking for ways to learn lessons from shooting cases.

SLED also fired an agent last year over alleged dishonesty, accusing Michele China, a senior agent in the Lowcountry, of doctoring paperwork in a child death probe and inserting a confession into a memo about an interview with a suspect in the case.

Brown has served as an expert on a federal committee on bloodstain analysis, according to a Commerce Department website. He also has been the second vice president for the South Carolina division of the International Association for Identification, a group of forensic scientists.

In his August letter about the agent’s firing, Keel said Brown had “acted improperly” on July 8 when he posted on another person’s public Facebook page about “a pending homicide case.”

“The Facebook posting included a news article that referenced the subject and victim of the case,” Keel wrote. “You made negative comments about the strength of the prosecution’s case, implying that it was a flawed case.”

The copy of the letter in the motion by Slager defense lawyer Andy Savage does not cite the exact words Brown was accused of using.

Savage asked in the paperwork for a judge to order authorities to hand over information about the internal affairs probe into the Facebook post. The document called Brown a primary investigator on Slager’s case.

Slager Sues Police Union For Doing The Right Thing

When even the police union refuses to overlook the obvious guilt of a police officer, you have to know things are going badly for you. Even in really blatant cases, it’s pretty unheard of for a police union not to uphold the Thin Blue Lie and profess the innocence of fellow cops. That’s not the case with Michael Slager and the Southern States Police Benevolent Association, though. Apparently, even the most ardent of police murder enablers can see the writing on the wall for a guy who was caught on video (see below) executing someone from behind as he ran away.

Via the PostAndCourier.com:

Slager paid the organization a monthly fee for insurance that would provide him a legal defense if sued or charged with a crime in connection with his actions as a police officer. But the organization abandoned him after Slager was accused in April of killing Walter Scott during an on-duty confrontation, according to the lawsuit…

Slager’s coverage through the PBA entitled him to legal representation for “any duty related shooting or action which results in death or serious injury,” according to the lawsuit. He has maintained that he was acting within the scope of his duties at the time. He has pleaded not guilty to the murder charge and remains jailed while awaiting trial.

The PBA initially assigned criminal defense attorney David Aylor to represent Slager. Aylor released a statement on his behalf the day before the video surfaced.

The next day, however, when Slager was charged with murder and the video of the shooting went viral around the world, Aylor withdrew as Slager’s lawyer, calling the incident “a terrible tragedy that has impacted our community.”

Slager requested that the PBA provide him with another attorney, but on April 8 the organization turned him down, the lawsuit stated. In doing so, the PBA cited a clause in its insurance coverage allowing it to withhold benefits if it determines an officer had “committed an intentional, deliberate and/or illegal act, either civilly or criminally,” the lawsuit stated.

First Person Account and Video of the Arrests of Ademo Freeman and Brian Sumner

Below are first person accounts of the arrests and the initial court appearance for Ademo Freeman and Brian Sumner. Included below that are the videos of that arrest. See here for the Call Flood Request.

Monday: Chalking Again

After the arrest in Kansas,  Ademo and Brian decided to avoid any further disruptions to the Mobile Accountability for Cops (M.A.C.) tour by dealing with the warrant issue in Indiana and turning themselves in now. They met up with a local Cop Blocker in Indianapolis and proceeded to gather up supplies and head to Noblesville. At approx. 8:30pm on October 26th, a group of five cop blockers ( including the M.A.C. team) headed over to the Noblesville police station to draw the attention of the local police force by chalking the same place that resulted in the original warrant.

After roughly 20 minutes of chalking and filming, the first signs of police presence were seen. One cop came running out of the entrance to the government offices with a second officer also running around the corner (obviously prepped to bring the ultra violence). Mere moments later, two police cruisers rolled up and more cops where beginning to surround Ademo and Brian.

ChalkingThey began questioning the two about who they were and what they were doing, promptly arresting Ademo and seemed almost hesitant to arrest Brian, but ended up doing it anyway. During the arrests, the cops tried desperately to justify themselves and their actions, but could barely hold up against the backlash from Ademo and Brian.

One of the elder cops called out a question of who wanted to take Ademo to jail and one officer literally jumped and skipped at the chance. It was a shameful display. Ademo was the first to be taken across the street and placed in a local pd SUV, Brian wasn’t too far behind. He was taken to a different SUV, but this was a K-9 unit and Brian vocally protested having to ride in that vehicle with the dog. So the officers were just kind enough to put him in a different cruiser.

Free SpeechAfter the M.A.C. crew was taken away, the remaining three cop blockers stayed and talked to the police and filmed them attempting to look professional while putting sidewalk chalk into evidence bags and photographing the sidewalk art. Eventually the police got firemen from the attached fire house to grab a garden hose and start washing off the chalk (which came right off) until they got tired of us filming and told them to just stop. This resulted in some of the officers and firefighters (chalk washers?) questioning why they were just going to leave it.

Tuesday: Initial Hearing

One of the cop blockers from the night before attempted to file a request to record the court hearing and was denied based on some supreme court ruling saying you cant record shit in Indiana for reasons. Regardless, at 1:15pm, the hearing was getting underway and the M.A.C. team were last to go up on the monitor connected to the local metal rape cage facility. The hearing was really nothing more than to declare bond amounts and ask the defendants if they wanted a lawyer and if they understood their charges.

While the judge was 100% set on not deviating from that purpose, Ademo put on a beautiful display of protest against the charges, the court, and the judge. Brian also questioned the entire farce with some of the best lines of the year (will be heard in upcoming audio recording purchased from the court ). The hearing for them ended without much fanfare and away they went to continue being kept separated and in different “pods.”

There’s been no word as of yet on whether Ademo has talked to anyone, but Brian did get a phone call out to his girlfriend and said he was OK and everything was alright. Their next pre-trial hearing is set for Dec. 8th at 9am. There will be an ALL HANDS ON DECK open carry chalking protest event held that very morning starting at 7am at the police station, court house, and well, the entire town. Then there is another hearing set for January 14th at 1:30pm. Other protests throughout the country are being planned.

 Raw video via the CopBlock Network on Facebook:

Raw (unedited) video of Ademo and Brian David Sumner going to the Noblesville Police Department headquarters to “turn…

Posted by CopBlock Network on Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Second Raw (unedited) video of Ademo and Brian David Sumner going to the Noblesville Police Department headquarters to “…

Posted by CopBlock Network on Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Call Flood Request for Ademo Freeman and Brian Sumner in Noblesville, IN

Update: Brian Sumner has been switched to a different prosecutor.

The new prosecutor is:

  • Brian Patrick Johnson
  • Hamilton County Prosecutor
  • (317) 776-8595
  • Case Number: 29D05-1510-CM-008800

Ademo (Adam Mueller) still has the original prosecutor:

  • James Baldwin
  • Hamilton County Prosecutor
  • (317) 776-8595
  • Case Number: 29D05-1510-CM-008801

Background/Call Flood Request

As you’ve undoubtedly heard by now, Ademo Freeman and Brian Sumner were arrested Monday in Noblesville, Indiana on outstanding warrants that had been issued as a result of a chalk protest they conducted there last month. Prior to that, they had been taking part in the Mobile Accountability for Cops Tour in order to bring attention to issues concerning the lack of accountability for police and to connect with various Cop Block chapters across the country. The chalk protest in Noblesville was part of the first stop on that tour.

During the stop in Kansas City, Ademo was arrested for a “criminal mischief” warrant that was originally stated to be a felony, but in reality was a misdemeanor. This warrant stemmed from the protest in Noblesville and, apparently, based on the use of “liquid chalk,” which like any other sidewalk chalk is also completely washable and easily removed with nothing but water. It was shortly after revealed that Brian also had a warrant for the same charge.

Free Ademo Free BrianAdemo and Brian have asked that people contact the officials in Noblesville that have decided to attempt to prosecute peaceful protesters for something that has already been ruled legal and constitutionally protected under the First Amendment as Free Speech several times in the past.

Sidewalk chalk, as the name would obviously indicate, is a common product designed, marketed, and used on a regular basis to draw on sidewalks. It’s an incredible rarity for anyone to be arrested or even cited for doing so on public property, which sidewalks unarguably are. Almost exclusively, those few arrests have been the result of chalk being used as part of a protest and, once again almost exclusively, those cases have been thrown out or defeated in court. It amounts to nothing short of intimidation and a retaliatory act.

Please contact James Baldwin, the prsecutor in their case or if you are in the area (and you really want to let them know you disapprove), visit the Noblesville Police Department and exercise your first amendment right with some chalk. Let them know that they shouldn’t trying to intimidate and retaliate against citizens for exercising their constitutional rights to protest against government abuses and injustices.

Brian and Ademo’s case number: 29D05-1510-CM-008801

Pre-trial: December 8th at 9am

Omnibus hearing: January 14th 1:30pm

James Baldwin: (317) 776-8595

There will be a chalking protest event held the morning of December 8th (the day of their next court date) starting at 7am at the police station, court house, and well the entire town.

Noblesville Police Department:

Hamilton County Jail:

Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office:

City of Noblesville:

John Ditslear, Mayor of Noblesville:

Hamilton County, Indiana:

County Commission:

Dan Stevens Assistant to the Commissioners:

  • Phone – (317) 776-9719
  • EmailEmail

Liquid ChalkIt’s an indisputable fact that sidewalk chalk (liquid or otherwise) causes no material damage and can easily be cleaned with a regular garden hose or typical water bucket. Like in previous cases, the charges filed against Ademo and Brian were filed simply because the police and other authorities in Noblesville don’t like the fact that the messages being written criticized them and exposed the crimes that they are not held accountable for.

Those messages could easily be cleaned up, even though the only real reason to have to do so is to try and hide what they say from those the police claim to “Serve and Protect.” However, the shame of the injustice and lies that the messages brought attention to cannot so easily be erased.

#BlueLiesMatter and the #ThinBlueLies kill on both sides of that line.