Tag Archives: the war on some drugs

Seven Baltimore Police Officers Arrested on Multiple Federal Charges in Racketeering Indictment

Baltimore Gun Task Force Racketeering Indictments

Yesterday, seven cops from the Baltimore Police Department were charged with multiple federal crimes in a racketeering indictment. Sgt. Wayne Jenkins and Detectives Momodu Gondo, Evodio Hendrix, Daniel Hersl, Jemell Rayam, Marcus Taylor, and Maurice Ward were all accused of “shaking down citizens” for cash, as well as filing false court paperwork and making fraudulent overtime claims. All seven were part of the “Gun Trace Task Force,” which worked to remove illegal guns from the streets in Baltimore.

In addition, Det. Gondo was also indicted on drug charges with five other people that are not police officers. That indictment included using inside information to tip off drug dealers regarding BPD investigations. Gondo was also accused of being directly involved in the drug operation itself.

The crimes were uncovered in the process of an ongoing probe by the FBI into a pattern of civil rights abuses perpetrated by members of the Baltimore police. That probe was initiated after attention was focused on the city by the murder of Freddie Gray in April of 2015 and the subsequent riots.

Via the Baltimore Sun:

(United States Attorney Rod J.) Rosenstein accused the officers of participating in “a pernicious conspiracy scheme” that “tarnishes the reputation of all police officers.”

“These defendants were allegedly involved in stopping people who had not committed crimes, and not only seizing money but pocketing it,” he said. “These are really robberies by people wearing police uniforms.”

All seven officers appeared in handcuffs and street clothes for initial hearings in U.S. District Court in downtown Baltimore on Wednesday afternoon. Each was represented by a court-appointed attorney. Each affirmed he understood the charges against him.

All of the officers were ordered held pending detention hearings. Hearings for Gondo, Hendrix, Hersl, Jenkins, Rayam, and Ward were scheduled for Thursday. A hearing for Taylor was scheduled for Friday.

Prosecutors and the officers’ attorneys will argue at those hearings about whether the officers should be released before their trials.

Family members of several officers were in the courtroom and voiced their support and love before the officers were taken away. Family members declined to comment.

Defense attorneys for the officers said they were still getting acquainted with the allegations in the indictment.

Police union President Gene S. Ryan said union officials were “very disturbed” by the charges against its members.

“These officers are entitled to due process and a fair trial in accordance with the Constitution and the laws of our state,” Ryan said in a statement. “It would be inappropriate for me to make any further comment until the charges leveled against these officers are finally resolved.”

Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby said the involvement of federal authorities “confirms the inherent difficulties with the BPD investigating itself,” and warned the indictment would have “pervasive implications on numerous active investigations and pending cases.”

Her office was not involved in the investigation, and was not informed of it until Wednesday morning…

Some of the officers have long been accused of using excessive force or of other wrongdoing. The city has paid out more than $500,000 in settlements in cases involving the officers, according to a review by The Baltimore Sun.

Members of the city’s state legislative delegation called for a federal investigation into Rayam in 2009 after he was involved in three shootings over the course of two years. The city has settled multiple lawsuits involving Hersl.

“The majority of these officers have been known to my attorneys as having significant credibility issues,” Baltimore Deputy Public Defender Natalie Finegar said. “We have aggressively been pursuing personnel records to be able to highlight the issues with their credibility on the force.”

Rosenstein said federal prosecutors quietly dropped five cases involving the Gun Trace Task Force while the officers were being investigated.

As recently as October, the Police Department was praising the unit in an internal newsletter for its work getting guns off the streets. The unit made more than 110 gun arrests in less than 11 months last year…

In one incident in September, federal prosecutors said in court papers, the officers stopped an individual leaving a storage facility and said they had a warrant to search his storage unit. They did not, authorities said. Hersl, Jenkins and Rayam then took a sock containing $4,800 and removed $2,000, prosecutors said.

Rayam was recorded telling Gondo that he had “taxed” the man, prosecutors said.

“He won’t say nothing,” Rayam was recorded saying, according to prosecutors.

A month earlier, prosecutors said, officers pulled a man over, detained him and took drugs and $1,700 from him. No incident report was prepared regarding the stop, prosecutors said.

In another incident in July 2016, prosecutors said, they stole $70,000 and divided the money up.

Prosecutors said the officers alerted each other to potential investigations into their activities, coached each other to give false testimony to internal affairs investigators, and turned off their body cameras to avoid recording their encounters.

The criminal activity occurred throughout 2016, prosecutors said. The Justice Department was investigating the department for much of the year.

Justice Department investigators reported that the department routinely violated individuals’ constitutional rights by conducting unlawful stops and using excessive force, among other problems. They concluded that those practices overwhelmingly affected residents of poor, predominantly black neighborhoods.

The Justice Department and the city agreed to terms of a consent decree in January outlining sweeping reforms to the department. That agreement awaits approval by a federal judge.

“We wouldn’t be under a consent decree if we didn’t have issues,” Davis said. “We have issues.”

Meanwhile, the officers’ work was celebrated by the department. Lt. Chris O’Ree wrote in October that the seizure of 132 guns in less than 11 months was “no small task.”

“Their relentless pursuit to make our streets safer by removing guns and arresting the right people for the right reasons has made our City safer,” O’Ree wrote.

Prosecutors also said the officers filed for overtime they didn’t work. On one day in July 2016, prosecutors said, one of the officers told another about being in the poker room at the Maryland Live Casino in Anne Arundel County. The second officer said he was going to get a drink, prosecutors said. Both filed for overtime that day, prosecutors said.

Jenkins nearly doubled his annual salary of $85,400 with $83,300 in overtime in 2016, prosecutors said. Hersl was paid $66,600 in overtime on top of a base salary of $77,600. Taylor made an extra $56,200 on top of his $66,800 salary.

There’s several things that are interesting about this case. One is the fact that, just several months ago the Baltimore Police Department, who was not informed of the investigation until the indictments were ready to be filed, was praising the great work of these same officers. Despite that praise, even before these indictments, several of them already had a history of misconduct complaints, including allegations of violence.

Beyond that, the very nature of the case involves a bit of irony in the characterization of the crimes committed. In his speech while announcing the indictment, Rosenstein described what they were accused of this way: “These defendants were allegedly involved in stopping people who had not committed crimes, and not only seizing money but pocketing it. These are really robberies by people wearing police uniforms.”

Of course, if they had limited themselves to finding an excuse to stop drivers out on the highway, oftentimes whose only “crime” is having out of state license plates, then they could have legally and without any recourse taken whatever cash those drivers had on them. Such cash seizures require no conviction or even so much as the filing of criminal charges. In reality, you could say that the only difference between what they did and drug forfeiture laws was the part about them personally pocketing the money.

In fact, in essence the only real difference between the officially sanctioned robberies by people wearing Magic Uniforms and the ones these guys will eventually be given probation and/or community service for was that they didn’t give the government its cut of the profits from their self described “taxation.”

Cleveland Cop Who Previously Shot Unarmed Man, Allowed To Attend Rehab Instead Of Jail After Drug Arrest

A member of the Cleveland Police Gang Unit, who was involved in a 2015 shooting of an unarmed man that the department initially lied about, was later himself busted for drugs. However, instead of going to jail, he’s been given a deal that will allow him to go to rehab instead of having his guilty plea count as a conviction.

In the shooting, for which a lawsuit is set to go to trial soon, Detective Jon Periandri claimed that the man he shot during a drug bust, Joevon Dawson, had gotten out of a car with a gun in his hand. The other five Good Cops at the scene backed up his story and one of them also moved a bullet casing to support the claim. Even Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams got in on the act, making a statement to the press at the scene that Dawson was armed when he was shot.

However, information later released as part of the lawsuit indicated that the only gun recovered at the scene had been stored within the center console area on the inside of the vehicle. Investigators from the Ohio Attorney General’s Office Bureau of Criminal Investigation concluded that the gun could not have been used by Dawson.

Meanwhile, even as he was in the process of arresting and shooting people for drug crimes he was simultaneously buying drugs by the handful. In fact, evidence showed that he literally ordered drugs while on duty as part of the narcotics squad. Incidentally, his taste for prescription pain killers and heroin were uncovered after a drug bust that included the Brooklyn, Ohio Law Director and the son of the mayor of Parma, Ohio.

Via Cleveland.com:

Periandri would soon face criminal investigation for another incident that happened in the weeks before and after the shooting.

In October 2015, as investigators continued probing the Dawson shooting, local and federal authorities raided the Seven Hills home of Alfonso Yunis, a suspected drug dealer.

Police found Yunis counting and crushing pills at his house along with then-Brooklyn law director Scott Clausen and attorney Brian Byrne, son of Parma Mayor Mike Byrne.

All three were arrested. A subsequent tip from a confidential police informant and a search of Yunis’ cellphone turned up hundreds of text messages with a number that was later traced to Periandri, according to court records.

The messages appeared to be “criminal in nature” and showed Periandri, a detective in charge of investigating and arresting drug dealers, repeatedly requesting to buy prescription painkillers and heroin off of Yunis, and even agreeing to act as a middleman for some drug deals, according to a search warrant affidavit obtained by cleveland.com in December 2015.

Dawson’s attorney entered the affidavit as evidence in the federal lawsuit on Thursday.

Messages seized from May 23, 2015 showed that Periandri ordered drugs while he working during protests in Cleveland that followed the acquittal of Cleveland police officer Michael Brelo on manslaughter charges in the 2012 killing of an unarmed couple. He also used a shorthand for what the affidavit describes as a racial slur to describe the protesters.

Cleveland police’s internal affairs unit launched an investigation and, that same month, obtained a warrant to collect a hair sample from Periandri and have it tested for drugs.

But before they could execute the warrant, Periandri took a medical leave of absence and checked himself into a drug rehabilitation center in California, internal investigators wrote in the affidavit.

The deal

A May 13, 2016 email between from Cleveland police commander Brian Heffernan to Williams, the head of internal affairs Lt. Monroe Goins and another Cleveland police officer indicated that Periandri was in talks with Assistant Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Jim Gutierrez.

The two agreed that Periandri would be charged by information and plead guilty to a felony drug possession charge at a June 7 court hearing. He would receive treatment in lieu of conviction, the email says.

Periandri would then serve a year’s probation, and the charge would be dropped from his record if he successfully completed treatment. In exchange, Periandri agreed to give up his certification to be a police officer.

But that court hearing never happened.

Prosecutors did not charge Periandri until Thursday, more than eight months after the original offer, according to court records. And the information was not delivered to the clerk’s office until about 1:30 p.m. Monday, after reporters began asking the prosecutor’s office about Periandri’s case.

The information, signed by Gutierrez, Periandri and Periandri’s attorney, Robert Dixon, is stamped Jan. 19. A note stuck on the outside of Periandri’s file says the information was “back-dated” to Jan. 19.

Kathleen Caffrey, a spokeswoman for the prosecutor’s office, said on Monday that Periandri had been charged by information and pleaded guilty in June.

After a reporter asked for a copy of the information and more information about the court hearing on Tuesday, she called to say that she had misinterpreted a conversation with Gutierrez and that no June agreement was reached.

Periandri was allowed to retire from the department for medical reasons on Aug. 9, 2016, Williams said.

Also, when reporters began asking about the drug “conviction” as a result of discovery information from the lawsuit, a spokesman for the prosecutor’s office explained that the records of it had never been entered into the Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court’s public docket due to an “IT issue.” #SeemsLegit

Harris County Sheriff’s Office Drops Drug Charges Against Texas Man After “Meth” Turns Out to be Cat Litter

A sock full of cat litter ended up leading to a Texas man being publicly branded as a drug dealer, when deputies with the Harris County Sheriff’s Office managed to mistake it for meth. In yet another case of faulty field tests that have repeatedly been exposed as wildly inaccurate, police issued a press release and bragged on Facebook about how their “big drug bust” had kept everyone’s children save from the scourge of methamphetamines.

Meanwhile, Ross Lebeau was taken to jail on charges of drug possession with the intent to distribute, based on the “meth” weighing in at over half a pound. As a result, he lost work and will be forced to go through the process of having his record expunged, even though the charges were dropped, to avoid the stigma of having been identified, very publicly, as a drug dealer.

In spite of that, Lebeau is surprisingly unwilling to place any blame on the deputies who used notoriously innacurate equipment to declare the cat litter was an illegal substance. For their part, the Harris County Sheriff’s Office released a second press release, in which they had no problem whatsoever placing the blame squarely on Lebeau’s shoulders saying that the deputies did everything right and that his statement that he didn’t know what the “unknown substance” was is what was responsible for the mix-up.

Via ABC13.com (in Houston):

Lebeau and his attorney do not blame the deputies for the ordeal, rather the field tests.

“Ultimately it might be bad budget-cutting testing equipment they need to re-evaluate,” said George Reul, who added prosecutors practically laughed when he told them it was cat litter.

“I would like an apology,” said Lebeau.

He says the accusation has caused him to lose work, not to mention the embarrassment. He will work to expunge his record.

“I was wrongly accused and I’m going to do everything in my power, with my family’s backing, to clear my name,” he said.

Harris County Sheriff’s Office Statement:
The Harris County Sheriff’s Office deputies stopped Mr. LeBeau for a traffic offense on December 5, 2016 at 4:30 p.m. During that initial stop the deputies detected a strong odor of Marijuana emitting from his vehicle. Mr. LeBeau was question and admitted to having marijuana in the console of his vehicle.

The drugs were recovered and in the process of inventorying his vehicle a substance was found wrapped in one sock in his vehicle. Mr. LeBeau was questioned about the contents at which time he indicated that he had no idea what it was. The deputies followed proper procedures and field tested the substance on two separate occasions which field tested positive for methamphetamines, notified the District Attorney’s Office who accepted charges for possession of controlled substance of 200 grams and Mr. LeBeau posted bond and was released.

During the investigation Mr. LeBeau failed to identify the substance and later, after being released indicated on social media that the substance was cat litter that he kept in a sock in his vehicle.

Regarding this incident all indication shows that the deputies followed basic procedures and followed established protocol related to this incident. Because of the established procedures in place and this contraband was submitted to the Institute of Forensic Science it was determined not to be methamphetamine and charges were dismissed.

It doesn’t look like he’s going to get that apology. At least the prosecutors were able to get a good laugh out of it.

California Police Charge Man With “Driving Under the Influence” of Caffeine

**UPDATE** The DUI charge was dropped on December 29, 2016. (One day after this post was published – #JusSayin)

Joseph Schwab was pulled over in the Northern California county of Solano in August of 2015. In spite of a breathalyzer indicating he had no alcohol whatsoever in his system, he was arrested and forced to have blood drawn. Once again, no alcohol or any illegal drug was found in his system. In fact, the only drug found in his system was caffeine. In spite of that, he is being charged with a misdemeanor for driving under the influence of a drug.

Via TheGuardian.com:

Shcwab was driving home from work when he was pulled over by an agent from the California department of alcoholic beverage control, who was driving an unmarked vehicle. The agent said Schwab had cut her off and was driving erratically.

The 36-year-old union glazier was given a breathalyzer test which showed a 0.00% blood alcohol level, his attorney said. He was booked into county jail and had his blood drawn, but the resulting toxicology report came back negative for benzodiazepines, cocaine, opiates, THC, carisoprodol (a muscle relaxant), methamphetamine/MDMA, oxycodone, and zolpidem.

The sample was screened a second time by a laboratory in Pennsylvania, according to documents provided to the Guardian, where the sole positive result was for caffeine – a substance likely coursing through the veins of many drivers on the road at any given time.

“I’ve never seen this before,” said (defense attorney Stacey) Barrett. “I’ve never even heard of it.”

Barrett has filed a motion for the case to be dismissed because the charges were not brought until June 2016 – nearly 10 months after incident. If that motion is denied, Schwab will take his case to a jury on 11 January.

Sharon Henry, chief deputy district attorney for Solano County, said in a statement that her office was “conducting further investigation in this matter”.

“The charge of driving under the influence is not based upon the presence of caffeine in his system,” she added.

Barrett counters that if the prosecution has evidence of a different drug in her client’s system, it should have to provided that to her, based on the rules governing criminal procedings (sic).

“I have not been provided with any evidence to support a theory of prosecution for a substance other than caffeine at this time,” she said. “Nor I have received any statements, reports, etc documenting any ongoing investigation since the [toxicology report] dated 18 November 2015.”

Henry declined to comment further, citing the right to a fair trial.

“It’s really stupid,” said Jeffrey Zehnder, a forensic toxicologist who frequently testifies in court cases. Over 41 years, Zehnder said, he had never seen a prosecution for driving under the influence of caffeine.

“If that’s the case, then they better come and arrest me,” he joked.

Zehnder was informed about the case by Barrett, but has not been contracted to testify on either side.

California vehicle code defines a “drug” as any substance besides alcohol that could affect a person in a manner that would “impair, to an appreciable degree” his ability to drive normally.

Making that case with caffeine would be difficult, Zehnder said, because the prosecutor would have to show that impaired driving was specifically caused by the caffeine and not any other circumstances.

“There are no studies that demonstrate that driving is impaired by caffeine, and they don’t do the studies, because no one cares about caffeine,” he said.

As for Schwab, he just wants this ordeal to be over. In a statement provided to the Guardian by his attorney, he said his reputation had been damaged.

“No one believed me that I only had caffeine in my system until I showed them the lab results,” he said. “I want the charges to be dismissed and my name to be cleared.”

It’s interesting that the charges weren’t filed until 10 months later, which means they knew that the tests came back showing no drugs in his system. Sounds like somebody was hoping that Schwab would just accept some sort of plea deal rather than deal with the ridiculous charge, as most people do. It also shows that they don’t really have any evidence to support charges based on anything real, such as reckless driving, so they likely just rolled the dice hoping that he wouldn’t be able to afford a lawyer and they could just railroad him into pleading guilty to a lesser charge rather than dropping the obviously false DUI charge.

Patriots Should Support the Black Lives Matter (BLM) Movement

The following post was shared with the CopBlock Network by Patrick Picarsic, via the CopBlock,org Submissions Page. It consists of an editorial style statement regarding the tendency that many people, especially those on the right, have to dismiss those involved in the Black Lives Matter movement, as well as some of the criticisms that have been leveled at them.

While I think that any group or movement can and very much should be open to criticism, regardless of the nature or origins of that group, and there are, of course, valid critiques of BLM, personally I think Patrick makes some very good points and cites very good historical context to counter many of the less valid (and oftentimes knee-jerk) criticism the movement has received.

What Is The Problem That People Have With Black Lives Matter?

I guess I’m a sympathizer. YouTube is filled with police abusing their power. Blacks are subjected to this state-sanctioned violence, disproportionately. I view police as armed agents of the state who’s primary purpose is generating revenue. They prey on poorer communities, and those less capable of defending themselves, usually enforcing the immoral and obscenely destructive war on drugs, to feed the prison industrial complex. Rockefeller drug laws, overuse of militarized SWAT teams, asset forfeiture, weakening of constitutional protections against searches and seizures, incentivizing private prisons to farm out slave labor to for-profit companies…it goes on and on!!!

Police are the boots on the ground that make all this possible. As an anti-authoritarian, I think the government should fear the people, NOT the other way around. That’s the beauty and purpose of impassioned protests and the occasional riot. Destruction of property has led to many great things!!! Boston Tea Party…Berlin Wall…Bastille, etc. Liberty is more valuable than safety.

It baffles me how any good patriot could be offended by a group who has the audacity to point out the many instances of thuggish blue violence against vulnerable segments of our population. Law enforcement should leave the inner cities and converge on Wall Street, kicking the shit out of any suit that paid Hillary’s speaking fees to start. Eventually, Americans might smarten up, stop blaming the wrong people, fire up the guillotines in front of the Bull, and don’t stop the executions until the street is ankle deep with the blood of bankers and oligarchs…

– Patrick Picarsic

Jeff Mizanskey: A Productive Member of Society Sentenced to Life in Prison for Marijuana

The following videos and post was shared with the CopBlock Network by Derrick Marshall, of Marshall & Associates  Investigations, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

This post was originally published at the Marshall & Associates Investigations blog under the title, “Jeff Mizanskey: Productive Member of Society.” The accompanying videos were posted at the “Citizens For JusticeYoutube Channel as part of a playlist that includes the interview of  Jeff Mizanskey by Derrick Marshall posted above, as well as a separate interview discussing the lack of medical care in prison that is embedded below.

Below the original post is a personal statement from Derrick Marshall explaining the background of the case, how he became involved, and his personal feelings about Jeff Mizanskey’s release.

Organizations which Jeff Mizanskey is associated with:

Jeff Mizanskey: Productive Member of Society

In 1996, Jeff Mizanskey was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole for a non-violent marijuana offense. He would spend nearly two decades in the Missouri Department of Corrections, before a group of family, friends, and supporters built a media campaign that led Missouri Governor Jay Nixon to commute his sentence, allowing him to be released on parole. On September 1, 2015, Jeff was released from Jefferson City Correctional Center to a crowd of loved ones and supporters.

Derrick Marshall of Marshall & Associates Investigations acted as Jeff’s private investigator while he fought for his freedom. Now a little more than a year after his release, Derrick visits Jeff at his worksite to see how he’s adjusting to society.

In the interview Jeff talks about how much money the tax payers spent to prevent him from being a productive member of society, short comings in the criminal justice system, and the failures of the drug war that led to him serving a life sentence for marijuana. He also opens up about how, although he is still somewhat uncomfortable talking in front of cameras, he believes it is absolutely necessary to create a desperately needed change in the system. Jeff strongly encourages others who have dealt with the prison system and lived to tell about it to speak out about their experience.

Jeff is currently running a construction crew, which he uses as an opportunity to teach younger men a valuable skill they can use to provide for their family. At the time of the interview, they were in the process of pouring the foundation for a tornado-resistant, octagon home near Jeff’s hometown of Sedalia, MO. He used the opportunity to demonstrate his skills for camera crew.

The owner of the home they are building, Herb Venable, described Jeff as a blessing and expressed disdain that the state would feel it necessary to waste taxpayer’s money to incarcerate a non-violent offender for such a draconian-sentence.

Jeff wrapped up the interview by thanking all their supporters for their continued support. He also took the opportunity to stress the fact that the current system needs a serious revamping. He firmly believes that unless we stand up to the status quo, we will remain in this position. He simply asks that everyone do their part.

– Derrick Marshall

My name is Derrick Marshall and I’m a private investigator with over 25 years of experience in the industry. Sometime back I became aware that a man was serving life in prison for non-violent marijuana offenses through a petition on Change.org. The more I dug into the story, the more outraged I became. The drug war had failed this man horrendously, as well as his family and the taxpayers at large, who were left to foot the bill for his continued incarceration. The anger swelled inside of me until I made a decision; I was going to help Jeff Mizanskey obtain his freedom.

Maybe I couldn’t do much. Maybe I couldn’t go in and secure his freedom, but I could sure do my part. To get in contact with the family, I’d have to do a little detective work. I zoomed in on a picture of Jeff’s brother, Mike, and noticed a bar sign in the back. Following up on the lead, I called the establishment to discover that his brother worked there. I introduced myself and told him I was at his family’s service until Jeff’s freedom was secured.

From that point, I spent hours on the phone with the family and Jeff’s attorney helping to develop a strategy to ensure Jeff was released as soon as possible. I ran background reports and contacted media outlets to spread the word about Jeff’s egregious circumstances and the efforts that were being made to correct this miscarriage of justice.

When I heard that Missouri Governor Jay Nixon had commuted Jeff’s sentence to life with parole I had mixed emotions. I was happy that Jeff would be able to leave the confines of the cold grey walls that had held him so long. I was happy he would be able to hug and hold his family whenever he wanted. I was happy he could eat and sleep the way he wanted and enjoy life like a somewhat normal person. But he would still be on parole for the rest of his life. He would still have to pay the criminal justice system for the “privilege” of being monitored by a parole officer. He would still have to ask permission to go certain places and do certain things. He would still be subject to the obstacle course of rules, regulations, and fees that had caused the downfall of so many other parolees before.

But a year later Jeff was thriving. He was running a construction crew and actively speaking out against the system that had tried (and failed) to destroy him. He was teaching younger guys how to do construction work while providing them guidance in life. He was receiving the highest level of praise from all those around him and had graduated to the lowest level of parole possible, which meant he had proved himself to his parole officer. Jeff had come out and proved the system wrong and I couldn’t have been prouder.

I was proud of Jeff for making a way for himself in spite of the incredible odds against him. I was proud of Jeff for being a mentor to others and using his experiences to guide others to the right path. I was proud of Jeff’s family for sticking it out with him for so many years when hope seemed bleak and the opportunity for freedom seemed almost impossible. I was proud of myself for recognizing an injustice and dedicating my time towards fixing it. And I was proud that, at least in a small way, my efforts paid off.

This letter might make it seem like I’m bragging, which in a way I am, but there’s a deeper goal behind it. The private investigation industry is cutthroat. A lot of PI’s are trying to outdo other PIs. One-up them if you will. Many times these competitions have negative implications. Businesses and reputations suffers as two egos battle it out. Maybe for once, the next time somebody tries to one-up me, they will succeed…

Succeed in freeing a man from unjust circumstances brought about by a criminal justice system in need of serious repair. Succeed in returning a father to his children, a husband to his wife, and a son to his parents. Succeed in helping turn someone society has been told to forget back into a productive member of society. For once, I hoped my competition would outdo me, and the world would be a little better place because of it.

Michigan Cop Arrests Motorist for Suspended License then Performs Illegal Body Cavity Search

Officer Daniel Mack of the Allen Park Police Department, located in the Detroit metropolitan area, stopped a local man because he claimed he couldn’t see a temporary registration sticker on a minivan he had just bought for his wife. During the traffic stop Mack determined that Kevin Campbell had a suspended license. For that he was arrested, but that was just the beginning of Campbell’s mistreatment at the hands (no pun intended) of Officer Mack and at least two other Good Cops that were present at the time.

Even though a K-9 failed to indicate there were any drugs in his car and there was no other evidence to indicate he had drugs in his possession, Campbell was taken to jail. Once there, he was subjected to a body cavity search, which was both illegal and humiliating. According to Cambell’s lawyer David Robinson, any body cavity search would require both a warrant and that a medical professional perform it.

The illegal search/sexual assault also failed to find any evidence of drugs.

Via wxyz.com, the Detroit area ABC affiliate:

“You can’t do that,” says Kevin Campbell on video captured inside the police lock-up on June 7, 2016.

“Yes, I can. Yes, I can,” says Allen Park Police Officer Daniel Mack.

Campbell, and his attorney David Robinson, say Officer Mack performed an illegal a body cavity search on Campbell.

“Why you putting your fingers in my [expletive]??  Why you feeling my [expletive],” says Campbell in the video.

“Cause you got [something] tucked into your [expletive],” said Mack.

Campbell denies that, and Mack finds nothing during the search.

“It was very dehumanizing,” Campbell told 7 Investigator Heather Catallo.  “What he did was unconstitutional, violated my civil rights and violated me as a man period.”

The 32-year-old father from Detroit says he was terrified to find himself in that jail cell, and says he felt helpless.

“My fear switched over to me wondering ‘am I really going to make it out of here alive,’” said Campbell.

Campbell says this all started back in June, when Officer Mack pulled him over on the Southfield freeway near Rotunda.  Campbell says he had just bought a minivan for his wife, and it still had the temporary paper license plate taped to the window.

“He said he couldn’t see the license plate.  I thought that was very weird and odd that he couldn’t see a license plate by it being 7:00 in the afternoon,” said Campbell.

Campbell was driving with a suspended license, since he says he can’t afford to pay the fees needed to reinstate his license.   So Officer Mack patted him down, arrested him, and that’s where Campbell says things start to go wrong.

“He ran my name, he then got the K9 dog out; him and the K9 dog went searching through the car – didn’t find anything,” said Campbell.

Allen Park Police officers do not have scout car cameras or body cameras.  If Mack ran the K9 dog through the vehicle, he would have needed probable cause to look for drugs, and a search warrant.  There was no search warrant that the 7 Investigators or Campbell’s lawyer could find.

Campbell says the dog didn’t find anything, because there were no drugs.  Yet when they arrive at the Allen Park Police Department, Officer Mack is insisting that Campbell put something down his pants.

“Your pants [are] unzipped.  I’m gonna find it one way or another, alright?  So we can do this the easy way or the hard way,” said Mack on the video.  “What you got in your drawers,” said Mack.

After Campbell is put in the holding cell, Officer Mack appears to become irate.

“Drop ‘em,” said Mack.
“Drop what,” asked Campbell.
“Your drawers,” said Mack.
“You want me to get naked,” asked Campbell.
“Yeah, you’re getting naked.  You’re in a holding cell, you’re getting naked,” said Mack.

Then, Officer Mack pats Campbell down for a third time, unzips Campbell’s pants, and looks down his underwear.

Officer Mack is still insisting that Campbell needs to take his pants off.

“Drop your drawers,” said Mack.
“I’m not taking my underwear off,” said Campbell.

Then two other police officers enter the room and Campbell and his lawyer say Mack begins the body cavity search.

“Why you putting your fingers in my [expletive],” said Campbell  “Why you feeling my [expletive].”
“Cause you got it tucked into your [expletive],” said Mack.
“No,” yelled Campbell.
When Mack doesn’t appear to find anything, he says, “You can keep it.”
“Ain’t nothing to keep,” said Campbell.

“The other officers were being aggressive with their voices telling me “don’t move,” and be still, but it’s kind of hard to be still when you know you have someone grabbing your testicles through your underwear, and putting their fingers in places that another man shouldn’t be,” said Campbell.

“It is a body cavity search; it is the worst intrusion by any public officer anywhere on the face of the planet,” said Attorney David Robinson.

Not surprisingly, Campbell has now filed a federal lawsuit against the city of Allen Park Police and Officer Mack for his actions that night. In addition the lack of a warrant and licensed medical professional, Ofc. Mack also failed to mention the cavity search in his police report. Documentation of any body cavity search conducted is another legal requirement.

Another less than shocking aspect of this story is that Officer Mack has a history of misconduct. Just last year, he was involved in a scandal in which he wrongfully arrested a completely innocent man. In that case, he charged a man named Arthur W. Chapman for reckless driving. After a bystander who had filmed the incident came forward, it was revealed that Chapman was merely driving a car similar to the person Mack had intended to arrest.

Dash Cam Video Shows Ohio Cop Smash Car Windshield With “Dangerous” Handcuffed Suspect’s Head

Yet another disturbing video of police violence against citizens has emerged. In this video, dash camera footage from a September 2014 arrest, Lorain (OH) police can be seen leading a suspect toward the police cruiser that is recording it.

As one of the officers reaches the hood of the car right in front of the dash cam, he smashes Pele Smith, who is handcuffed and in no way resisting, face first into the front windshield. The impact is hard enough that the window shatters. Reportedly, the cops then laughed at Smith as he bled from the head wound inflicted during the assault.

In spite of the video showing nothing of that sort, the police claimed that the brutality was justified by Smith “actively resisting.” Even though his record contained no evidence of it, they also claimed that Smith was a “violent drug offender” and implored people not to believe their lying eyes, because stuff that somehow wasn’t captured by the video gave them reason to put his head through a windshield.

Via CleveScene.com:

Lorain Police Chief Cel Rivera released a statement Wednesday calling Smith “a violent drug trafficker” and said the video “does not tell the complete story” and “could be misunderstood” by the public.

According to the Lorain County Clerk of Courts website, Smith has no felony convictions for violent crimes such as assault or robbery. He has prior convictions for drug offenses and possessing a firearm.

“During the arrest and Mr. Smith’s active resistance, he was placed on the hood of the police unit to gain control and conduct a search, as per policy,” Rivera said in his statement. “I would caution observers to not rush to judgment relative to the actions of the police on scene.

“Although it is not easy to watch, police officers explain all of their actions in their police reports.”

Of course, everyone knows that the cops never lie in their police reports to rationalize their violent behavior toward people.

Neither the Bad Apple who broke the windshield with the head of a defenseless person, nor any of the Good Cops who stood by watching it and never said a word about it, then or afterwards, have been named. And apparently, according to Chief Rivera, smashing a handcuffed suspect’s head through a windshield is “per policy” at the Lorain Police Department.

Oklahoma Police Officer Roy Collinsworth Arrested for Running a Giant Marijauna Grow Operation

The content for this post was shared with the CopBlock Network by “Kid Clint,” via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

This post concerns an officer with the Comanche Police Department in Oklahoma, who was arrested for running a giant marijuana grow operation in January of 2015. As is typical of the hypocrisy shown by many police officers, when Officer Roy Collinsworth wasn’t out busting people for victimless drug crimes he was at home growing and profiting from marijuana.

Date of Incident: January 29, 2015
Officers Involved: Officer Roy Collinsworth, Chief of Police Mike Jones, also District Attorney Jason Hicks
Department Involved: Comanche (OK) Police Department
Department Address: 500 N Rodeo Drive Comanche, Oklahoma 73529
Department Phone No.: (580) 439-2211
Department Fax No.: (580) 439-6308

According to a report, a Comanche Oklahoma police officer was accused of cultivating a marijuana patch inside a shed behind his “Red Hot” liquor store.

The Stephen’s County Sheriff’s Office said they were tipped off to Officer Roy Collinsworth’s marijuana operation and began an investigation.

Collingsworth was apparently surprised when investigators asked him about the drug operation.

According to the District Attorney’s Drug Task Force, when asked about his illegal drug operation, Collingsworth gave them the “No, No” song.

“Who me? Are you kidding? There is no way!”

The investigators for District Attorney Jason Hicks then asked if they could have a look around his business.

According to District Attorney Jason Hicks, “He allowed them the opportunity to go through the liquor store and [they] didn’t see anything there, so they asked if they could search another building.”

D.A. Jason Hicks stated that Collingsworth was very reluctant, but after further questioning agreed to let investigators search a building across the street from Comanche Public School. Investigators said, before they opened the door, Collingsworth stopped them and told them about an “old marijuana grow” that was allegedly inside the building.

Investigators said Collingsworth opened the door to the building and said “I don’t want to go to jail.”

D.A. Jason Hicks said that investigators for his Drug Task Force found 23 marijuana plants, fans for air circulation, thermostats for temperature regulation, razor knives for plant trimming, a water and fertilization system, and garden lights.

Hicks said “It was a pretty elaborate set-up, everything you would need to cultivate marijuana.”

Collingsworth was arrested, but is now out of jail on bond.

No word from Chief of Police Mike Jones since this incident occurred, and no word if the former officer has been charged, or if a court date was set.

According to Oklahoma State Statute:

  • Possession of any amount of marijuana is a crime, subject to up to one year of incarceration.
  • A subsequent conviction for possession is a felony which carries the penalty of 2-10 years of incarceration.

Okla. Stat. tit. 63, § 2-401 (2015)

Sale or Distribution

  • The sale of less than 25 pounds is a felony, punishable by incarceration for a period of 2 years-life, as well as a fine of $20,000.
  • Selling between 25 and 1,000 pounds. Penalties include a fine of between $25,000 and $100,000, between four years and life imprisonment, or both.
  • Selling 1,000 pounds or more is punishable with a maximum fine of $500,000, and/or between four years and life imprisonment.
  • The sale to minors is a felony, which is punishable by doubling the penalty for both the period of incarceration, as well as the fine to be paid.
  • The sale within 2,000 feet of schools, public parks, or public housing is a felony, punishable by a double penalty for both the period of incarceration as well as the fine. A conviction carries with it a mandatory minimum sentence of 50% of the imposed sentence.

Okla. Stat. tit. 63 § 2-401 (2015)

Cultivation

  • Cultivating up to 1,000 plants is a felony, punishable by a maximum $25,000 fine and between 20 years and life imprisonment.
  • Cultivation of more than 1,000 plants is punishable of a fine up to $50,000 and between 20 years and life imprisonment.

– Kid Clint

Cyril Oklahoma Police Officer Committed Perjury and Destroyed Evidence to Protect a Friend

cyril_ok_police_perjuryThe following post was shared with  NVCopBlock by Kid Clint, via the NVCopBlock.org Submissions Page.

Date of Incident: July 08, 2015
Officers Involved: Officer Loren Daniel Cole, Chief Chris Wagstaff
Department Involved: Cyril Police Department
Department Address: 202 W Main Street, P.O. Box 448 Cyril, Oklahoma 73029
Phone No.: (580) 464-2216
District Attorney: Jason Hicks
Stephens County Courthouse
Address: 101 South 11th street, Room 303 Duncan, Oklahoma 73533
Phone No.: (580) 255-8726
Fax No.: (580) 255-1889

According to a report, Loren Daniel Cole of Marlow, was working as a Cyril police officer on July 8, 2015 when he and other officers were called to investigate an assault at a home in Cyril. According to an affidavit written by Cole, no drugs were found in the house. However, there were some photographs taken at the time. One set of photographs showed marijuana on a table, and another set showed no marijuana on a table.

Officer Cole was accused of removing the marijuana from the scene, and tossing it in a trash can near the Cyril Police Department, then making false statements on the affidavit that no drugs were found at the residence.

After investigators noticed the photographs, they questioned Officer Cole. Cole then admitted to discovering marijuana at the original scene, but not mentioning it on the affidavit.

According to Caddo County District Attorney Jason Hicks, “We have two affidavits that are polar opposites. In Oklahoma, under statute, that’s perjury. We look at two sworn documents and one of them says, ‘X,’ and the other one says, ‘Y.’ It’s a pretty clear-cut case of perjury.”

Officer Cole admitted to changing the police report and disposing of the evidence. Cole says Chief of Police Chris Wagstaff instructed him to do so to protect the subject of the investigation from criminal charges who happened to be an EMT. Chief Wagstaff was apparently concerned that voices carry.

However, Wagstaff told investigators that he directed Officer Cole to “secure the evidence, not destroy it.”

If Chief Wagstaff did instruct officer Cole to destroy the evidence, then this is a case of not only perjury, but of corruption!

According to the Oklahoma State Statute:

  • Destruction of evidence is a misdemeanor under 21 O.S. § 454.
  • Perjury is defined in 21 O.S. § 491:
  • Whoever, in a trial, hearing, investigation, deposition, certification or declaration, in which the making or subscribing of a statement is required or authorized by law, makes or subscribes a statement under oath, affirmation or other legally binding assertion that the statement is true, when in fact the witness or declarant does not believe that the statement is true or knows that it is not true or intends thereby to avoid or obstruct the ascertainment of the truth, is guilty of perjury. It shall be a defense to the charge of perjury as defined in this section that the statement is true.
  • According to 21 O.S. § 500, perjury is a felony punishable by up to 20 years in prison, depending on the specific details of the crime:
    • When committed on the trial of an indictment for felony, by imprisonment not less than two (2) years nor more than twenty (20) years;
    • When committed on any other trial proceeding in a court of justice, by imprisonment for not less than (1) year nor more than ten (10) years; and
    • In all other cases by imprisonment not more than (5) years

– Kid Clint