Tag Archives: stolen car

Colorado Police Planned to Sell 80-Year Old Crime Victim’s Car Instead of Returning It To Her

Colorado Springs Police Car Auction Senior Citizen Victim

When 80 year old Mary Antrim’s stolen car was used in a robbery, Colorado Springs police told her it was on hold as evidence, then tried to auction it off without notifying her.

Back in June, Mary Antrim’s car, a Ford Crown Victoria, was stolen in Pueblo, Colorado. A few days later, it was recovered about 45 miles away by police in Colorado Springs after the unnamed person(s) who stole it used it in an aggravated robbery.

However, instead of returning her car once they recovered it, Colorado Springs police informed Antrim that it was being held as evidence. Then Antrim says they stopped answering her calls. The next time she heard anything her car, it had been scheduled to be auctioned off.

Via KOAA.com:

“They (police) told me it was involved in a robbery and that it was being held for evidence and that’s all I was told,” Mary said.

That information was give to Mary on June 5—more than a month ago!

“I’ve called them (police) every week to find out where the car is at and what’s going on with the car,” Mary said. “No one has called me back.”

Fast fast forward to July 10—Mary logs onto her computer and discovers her car is set to be auctioned off in September.

“I was dumbfounded,” she said. “I thought how in the world can the car go from being on hold for evidence and now it’s on hand and being ready to go to auction. I couldn’t believe that…”

“I need my car for my doctors appointments that I have to go to,” Mary said. “That’s my transportation and I’m 80 years old and I’d like to have my car back so I can do what I have to do.”

At that point, Antrim contacted one of those consumer investigation teams for a local news station. When KOAA News 5, the local NBC affiliate, called on her behalf they were told that the car was up for auction because she owed $178 for impound fees.

The problem with that answer, though, is that the Colorado Springs Police Department policy states that crime victims whose cars are impounded are not supposed to be charged storage fees. Another issue is that neither Antrim, nor her husband Clyde, were ever informed that the car had been released from the hold that had been placed on it as evidence.

In fact, the CSPD was even caught a lie regarding the latter requirement. When question, the department initially claimed that they had sent a letter to the Antrims on July 7th stated that the car had been released and giving them until September 11th to claim it before it would be auctioned.

However, the letter that was sent out was postmarked July 11th. By some odd coincidence, that just happened to be the same day that the TV station first contacted the Colorado Springs police about Antrim’s car.

Fortunately for Antrim, in the end, once the media was involved the police waived all of the impound fees (that she should have never been charged in the first place). The next day, her car was released and she was able to go down and reclaim it with being extorted out of any money first.

Meanwhile, the Colorado Springs Police Department hasn’t apologized or even offered an explanation for their “mistake.” Reportedly, they stated that they are “looking into it,” though. And we all know how thorough those internal investigations tend to be. I’m sure they’ll get right to the bottom of this whole thing.

KOAA.com | Continuous News | Colorado Springs and Pueblo

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Chicago Cop Who Shot Teens on Video Leaked by Judge Charged With Using Unreasonable Force (Update)

Marco Proano, the Chicago police officer who was recorded by a dash cam shooting at a car full of teenagers in December 2013, has now been indicted for civil rights violations. He stands accused of using unreasonable force against two of those teenagers, both of whom were injured in the shooting.

As was reported last year by CopBlock Network Contributor , the dash camera footage of that shooting only came to light almost two years later when an ex-judge leaked it to the public. In doing so, retired Cook County Judge Andrew Berman described the video as “the most disturbing thing he has seen in his 35 years in the Windy City court system.” (That says a lot when you are discussing violence in Chicago.) Which of course means that not one single one of the Good Cops in the video or who later watched the video and then decided to try and make sure it never saw the light of day again did anything to prevent that Bad Apple from spoiling the bunch.

Watching the video, it could not be more obvious that the teens represented no danger whatsoever to Officer Proano (or any other police on the scene) as they backed away from him. In fact, the video shows another car arrive at a nearby house and then back up out of the area shortly before the shooting. If anything, Proano endangered those innocent bystanders by shooting a dozen shots at the teens while they were in the same general area as them.

The teens had only been stopped for speeding, but the car they were in was later determined to be stolen. However, the one teen charged with possession of a stolen vehicle subsequently was acquitted of the charges.

Via Fox6Now.com:

The video shows Proano shooting multiple times at the vehicle as the driver tries to back away. The car then hits a streetlight before one injured teen stumbles out.

Police had pulled over the car with six teens for speeding, according to CNN affiliate WLS. One teen was wounded in the shoulder, the other in his hip and heel.

The victims suffered bodily injuries because of “unreasonable force by a police officer,” according to the indictment.

“When a police officer uses unreasonable force, it has a harmful effect on not only the victims, but also the public, who lose faith and confidence in law enforcement,” said Zachary T. Fardon, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois.

He said his office will continue to “vigorously” pursue civil right prosecutions of police officers to “strengthen trust in the police.”

The Chicago police department said it is fully cooperating with the US attorney’s office and has “zero tolerance for proven misconduct.”

As is noted in the full Fox 6 article, Officer Proano was finally fired after the video became public. Also, taxpayers had to bail out the Chicago Police Department once again, as a result of his actions.  The two teens shot during the incident received a $360,000 settlement.

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New York Cop Who Crashed a Stolen Car While Drunk Then Ran From the Scene Fined $1000 and Not Even Fired

Nicholas P. Kozack, a Kingston NY police officer, got drunk on St. Patrick’s Day, stole a car, wrecked into a highway sign after missing an exit, flipped the car totaling it, and then ran away from the accident site. He was later caught hiding nearby in someone’s backyard. Initially, he was charged with DWI, leaving the scene of an accident, and felony possession of stolen property.

One would think he’d be in big trouble after all that. However, one would soon be reminded that Officer Kozack has a Magic Suit that renders him impervious to meaningful consequences for his actions, regardless of how illegal, immoral, dangerous, or even deadly they might be. Instead, Kozack received a rather generous Policeman’s Discount and was allowed to plead to a misdemeanor DWI charge by Ulster County Assistant District Attorney Margo Hanstein.

His “punishment” will consist of a $1000 fine, getting one of his co-workers to sign a paper saying he attended a “victim’s impact” class, and having to get someone to blow into the tube attached to his car for a year when he drives drunk (unless he steals another car in order to avoid that indignity).

Priot to that, he also had to pay the person whose car he stole almost $2500 to cover what the insurance didn’t pick up and was given a thirty day suspension before it converted into a paid vacation for the past six months. But he could afford that since he didn’t even lose his $68,000+/year job. He also didn’t even lose his license, although there’s no word on whether he will be required to have an anti-alcohol ignition lock installed on his patrol car.

Via the Daily Freeman:

Kozack pleaded guilty before Ulster town Judge Marsha Weiss in full satisfaction of the charges against him. He was then sentenced to pay a $1,000 fine, ordered to attend a victims’ impact panel, and was ordered to install an ignition interlock device on his vehicle for one year.

Kozack was given a 20-day stay in order to apply for a conditional driver’s license. His license had been surrendered to Weiss in April.

His attorney, Kevin Harp, said Kozack had waived an earlier hearing with the state Department of Motor Vehicles regarding his refusal to submit to a sobriety test after the accident.

Harp added that Tuesday’s sentence was standard for a person pleading guilty to a misdemeanor drunken driving charge. (He forgot to add that people committing this type and number of crimes don’t typically get the opportunity to plead down to a misdemeanor drunk driving charge – Editor)

Prior to pleading guilty, a felony possession of stolen property charge against Kozack was reduced to a misdemeanor by Ulster County Assistant District Attorney Margo Hanstein.

The stolen property charge was in relation to the vehicle Kozack was driving at the time of the crash.

“He paid restitution to the owner of the vehicle to cover all out of pocket expenses not covered by insurance,” Harp said of Kozack. He said paying the $2,470.25 in restitution was required of Kozack as part of a plea deal.

Kozack, who was off duty at the time of the crash, was suspended for 30 days without pay after a unanimous vote of the Kingston Police Commission on March 16. After the 30 days expired, Kozack remained suspended but began receiving his pay again.

That’ll teach him.

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