Tag Archives: Reno

Talking to People Being Extorted/Harassed by Police No Longer Arrestable Offense in Las Vegas

Until yesterday one of the things we always had to caution people about while filming the cops here in Las Vegas was that they shouldn’t talk to the person who has been stopped. The natural inclination when you see the police violating someone’s rights and/or them surrendering those rights because they aren’t aware of them is to make them aware that they don’t have to consent to a search, answer questions, provide ID when not detained, etc.

However, there was a law on the books that stated speaking to police or the person they are potentially trying to kidnap constitutes impeding an investigation and therefore is a misdemeanor crime. Cops who are already not fans of being filmed and oftentimes looking for an excuse to harass or otherwise retaliate against people doing so, have been known to use this as a pretense to arrest Cop Blockers in the past.

However, that’s no longer one of the LVMPD‘s options for a throwaway “contempt of cop” charge. The Nevada Supreme Court in December ruled a similar statute up north in Carson City unconstitutional because it was “overbroad and to vague,” and therefore could be used to arrest pretty much anyone that speaks to a cop while they are performing other duties. As a result, the Las Vegas City Council repealed the Las Vegas version of that law.

Via the Las Vegas Review Journal:

The 5-2 decision comes off an appeal in the case of William Allen Scott, who was arrested in February 2014 in Carson City.

Scott was a passenger in a car that was pulled over after a sheriff’s deputy said it ran a stop sign, court records show. The deputy said he smelled alcohol and tried to administer a field sobriety test on the driver.

But Scott interrupted the deputy several times, telling his friend that he didn’t need to do what the deputy said. Scott was arrested, charged and eventually convicted of hindering a sheriff deputy’s duties for his outbursts.

The court said the law Scott was convicted of “criminalizes speech that is protected by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution,” according to court records.

In its decision, the court said the Carson City ordinance gave deputies too much discretion in enforcing the law. The opinion gave an extreme hypothetical example, saying the law allowed deputies who were directing traffic to arrest a pedestrian who simply asked them for directions.

It noted two state laws cover interfering with or resisting a public officer, but don’t allow for the same speech restriction.

Of course, in all likelihood they’ll all just get together and come up with a newer, better written version of the law that allows them to get around the Supreme Court’s ruling and for the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department to get back to retaliating against people they don’t like or those who are engaging in legal activities they disagree with in no time.

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Drunk Nevada Highway Patrol Trooper Christopher Wirtanen Crashes Into Reno Jack In The Box

Apparently, Nevada Highway Trooper Christopher J. Wirtanen worked up quite an appetite while out generating revenue for the State in Reno. Unfortunately, he also worked up quite a thirst along the way. The fact that he decided to satisfy his “thirst” before going for food didn’t really work out well for him or for a local Jack In The Box last weekend. Seems he took the drive thru concept just a bit too literally.

Via the Reno Gazette Journal:

Officers had responded at 2:31 a.m. Friday to a call of a car crash at the Jack in the Box on 5095 S. McCarran Blvd. Upon arrival, they found a silver Volvo resting on the curb near the entrance of the area shopping complex, according to the police report.

In the report, officers said they found Wirtanen alone in the car.

Witnesses told officers they saw Wirtanen trying to drive through the Jack in the Box drive-thru and then he reportedly hit the side of the restaurant. Witnesses also told police that Wirtanen drove the right side of his car onto the curb and pulled out of the drive-thru, scrapping the side of the car on the restaurant wall.

He then traveled across the parking lot, the police report said.

Reno Jack In The Box Drive Thru NHP DUIAn investigation showed that the driver traveled eastbound across the parking lot and drove up onto a planter box, striking some bushes. The driver then struck the raised curb with the front of the car before stopping.

In the report, officers said Wirtanen had admitted to drinking at least five Coors Light beers about an hour before he reportedly crashed. He had a breath alcohol content of .186 from a preliminary breath test, more than double the legal limit of .08.

Wirtanen was taken off the road and placed on desk duties, Department of Public Safety spokesman David Gibson said in an earlier interview.

“Nothing is going to happen as far as him being back in a car until he goes through the courts,” Gibson said.

He was also subject to an internal investigation pending the outcome of the arrest to see if he is able to return to his job on the road, Gibson said.

Wirtanen declined comment and referred comments to Gibson on Thursday. It was unclear if he had an attorney.

Wirtanen had made 23 DUI arrests in the past year. He was cooperating with the investigation and was due in court next on Feb. 1.

That last paragraph contains an interesting little tidbit that he’s been averaging close to two arrests a month for the same thing he is out there doing himself. This is also an interesting little prediction/Freudian slip from DPS spokesperson: “Nothing is going to happen as far as him being back in a car until he goes through the courts,” Gibson said. All the Good Cops up there in Reno will make sure he’s back in that car generating revenue and hypocritically arresting drunk drivers.

BTW, Coors Light? Dude, if you’re going to get tanked up, wreck the town, and potentially waste your life, at least be classy about it and drink something sophisticated like PBR.

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Nevada Sheriff’s Deputy Claims Open Carry is Illegal in Reno

This was received, via the submission form, from an open carry advocate in Reno who wishes to remain anonymous. It recounts his encounter with a member of the  Washoe County Sheriff’s Department during a traffic stop in Reno, NV. More importantly, it addresses some questions that arose due to the fact that this particular police officer was under the impression that openly carrying a gun in Reno is illegal (spoiler: it’s very legal). Additional comments and reaction is included below.

I’ve made some spelling, grammar, and punctuation corrections, as well as adding links throughout for informational purposes, but in terms of content, this is the story in its entirety as received:

I moved here about a year ago and have been open carrying in Reno, Nevada since I arrived, never had much trouble had a lot of people come up to me and ask about it.

So, today I decided to register and submit a post (originally on NVCopBlock.org) because on the way home from moving stuff out of storage we got pulled over by a sheriff’s deputy on a motorcycle. He gave us a ticket for my derpy friend not having his registration on him, but otherwise everything went fine.We immediately told him we were both armed and open carrying. He didn’t even draw or look too worried, just told us to put our hands on the dash. Then three seconds later, he told us to get out and switch the license plates around because he had the registration sticker on the front plates not the back. So we did that while he was issuing the ticket.

Open Carry is Completely Legal and Unrestricted in Nevada

Afterwards, he gave us the ticket and asked us why were open carrying and then proceeded to laugh when we told him it was our right and it’s for our own protection etc., etc…He mocked us and said we should just relax and enjoy life sometimes…(Whatever that means?)I then replied, ”well we cant exactly carry you around with us 24 hours a day and 7 days a week, sir.”

We bantered back-n-forth a bit and then, when we were about to leave, he said ”If I really wanted to be an ass, I could cite you for open carrying in Reno, because the Reno city ordinance overrides the state law about open carrying in the state of Nevada.” He then went on to tell us we should look it up and probably not open carry anymore and kept saying ”he was pretty sure it overrides the state ordinance.”

Artist Rendering of the Person who Submitted this Story

When he said that it came off VERY threatening and I wanted to start an argument right then and there, but that probably wouldn’t of been the best idea…I got his name and badge id…if I can do anything with it…

So I started googling….and I’ve researched the laws here A LOT before I even started open carrying…every time I hear something I always look it up…but for a sheriff to bring some BS city of Reno code that overrides the constitution and state law made me research some more…and that’s how I found this thread and I’ve since printed up 10 of your excellent pamphlets! Thanks!

I’m 99.99% certain that he is incorrect…and please correct me if I’m wrong…but how do police, cops, sheriffs, whatever not know the law? This is mind boggling….

ALSO what should I do with a officer who DOESN’T know the law and tries to do something about me legally carrying ?

I wish I would of recorded the whole ordeal…isn’t there like a hotline I can call and it records my stuff? and then I can download the call on my computer?

As stated earlier, it is very much legal to open carry in Nevada, which of course includes Reno. In regards to Reno law taking precedence over state laws, nothing could be further from the truth. The first problem with that idea is that there aren’t any Reno statutes prohibiting open carrying of firearms. The second flaw (and the reason for the first one) is that the State of Nevada specifically restricts local jurisdictions from passing gun laws that impose more severe restrictions on gun rights than those imposed by state law.

NRS 244.364, NRS 268.418, and NRS 269.222 state that the legislature reserves to itself the right to regulate the transfer, sale, purchase, possession, ownership, transportation, registration and licensing of firearms and ammunition in Nevada, and that no county, city or town respectively may infringe upon these rights. (emphasis added)

In relation to the Constitution, we’re unfortunately at the mercy of whoever is interpreting it and in the case of gun laws the Supreme Court interpreted it to mean that states have a right to restrict how and where citizens may exercise the Second Amendment . Which is why there are varying degrees of legality for openly carrying firearms throughout the different states. That’s one of the many reasons why relying on a piece of paper to “protect” your rights is a bad idea.

Fortunately for those of us living in Nevada though, our state has one of the most liberal (in the literal sense) applications of gun laws. In fact, with the exception of the requirement to register guns in Clark County (which has been eliminated since this incident happened and never applied to Reno, regardless), there are no restrictions on open carry within Nevada.

However, less fortunate for us is the reality that it really isn’t that unusual for “police, cops, sherriffs, whatever” to not know the laws that they are planning to enforce and often there’s little or nothing we can do about it. In answer to the question of what you should do when confronted with a heavily armed government employee that doesn’t understand gun laws, my advice would be to assert your rights, while attempting to avoid a violent confrontation that could go very wrong. When in doubt, the safest bet is to wait it out and then file a complaint after the fact (that’s where that name and badge number come into play). Sometimes it can actually make a difference. However, that’s a choice you need to make for yourself.

And of course, we advocate always recording any interaction that you have for police to create a unbiased record of exactly what happened and why. I’m not personally aware of any service that records downloadable audio, but Bambuser has put out a great app that allows you to record and stream live video from your cell phone that is instantly posted to the internets and therefore can’t be erased or tampered with if the phone is confiscated.

Then get that video to us

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In Nevada, the Most Distinctive Cause of Death is the Police

This week, the Las Vegas Review Journal wrote about a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which outlined the “most distinctive” cause of death for each of the 50 states. Something that’s not a giant shock to anyone living in Las Vegas and especially those who have watched and dealt with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (and other Las Vegas area police departments) over the years, was that “run ins with police” was declared the most distinctive cause of death for those living in Nevada. (I’ll let you make that joke about the police being officially classified as a disease.)

From the LVRJ article:

Beware of the World's Biggest Gang!

Beware of the World’s Biggest Gang!

Nevada’s most distinctive cause of death — though not its most frequent — isn’t a disease.

It’s encounters with law enforcement, according to a new state-by-state report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Encounters with law enforcement in this case does not include executions.

The study maps out how geography factors into the prevalence of rare killers. For 22 states, the total number of these types of deaths was under 100.

The Silver State falls into that group, with deaths by so-called legal intervention at 82, a rate 2.8 times the national average, said Francis Boscoe of the New York State Cancer Registry and the lead researcher in the study.

Researchers couldn’t identify a clear reason why death by legal intervention garnered the most distinction in Nevada as well as New Mexico and Oregon.

Since it’s actually not real clear in the original article, the criteria for “most distinctive cause of death” needs to be explained a bit. As stated in the first paragraph, the most distinctive cause of death isn’t the most frequent cause of death. What it actually represents is the cause of death for which a state ranks highest compared to the rest of the country. So, in essence, it means your state excels in a certain specific way of dying, when compared to the nation at large. In Nevada’s case, summary executions by police happen at almost three times the rate of the rest of the United States. Interestingly enough, these stats for deaths that are preceded by the arrival of a cop don’t actually include executions involving a judge and jury. I don’t doubt that brought Texas’ ranking down in a big way. (You saw what I did there.)

bannerNETAs far as those CDC researchers not being able to identify the reason why coming into contact with a cop is especially dangerous in Nevada, they should come with me some time and talk to some of the people living in Las Vegas, especially those in poor and/or minority neighborhoods. The heavy-handed and violent tactics of the police, along with their shoot first mentalities, utter lack of accountability, and retaliatory practices toward anyone that tries to hold them accountable all play a part in the “distinctive” level of danger interacting with Las Vegas area cops represents. In fact, in a city that not only encourages, but often glorifies unhealthy habits, such as smoking and excess drinking, it takes a lot to distinguish yourself as an accomplished killer. As people here are all too familiar though, the LVMPD has a long history of striving to be the most distinctive in that regard.

“Las Vegas Police (and Security, BLM) Brutality Compilation via Jason Nellis at “The World as seen by Jazoof.”

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Active Duty Soldier with PTSD Shot and Killed by Reno/Sparks Police

Kenneth Stafford, who was killed by Reno police in June of 2013

Kenneth Stafford, who was killed by Reno police in June of 2013

This post was received via submission (included in its entirety below the video) from Terry A. Colgrove, who is the mother of Kenneth J. Stafford, a soldier from the Reno area that was killed by the police in Sparks, NV (a suburb of Reno), while suffering a PTSD-related episode on July 11th, 2013. His wife had called 911 to report that he was suicidal and, as has increasingly become the case when people call the police for help with medical or mental health issues, police responded by killing him.

Note: Currently, there is a FaceBook page, entitled “Justice for Kenneth Jewel Stafford,” where you can connect with his family and find out more about the case. In addition, there is a GoFundMe account that has been set up to collect donations for his family.

With the never-ending middle east wars and the amount of soldiers returning from them with mental health issues, such as PTSD, cases of veterans being killed by police have been on the rise and increasingly in the spotlight. Here in Las Vegas, inadequate care by the VA and the inability of the police to deal with PTSD sufferers was one of the main factors that led to the murder of Stanley Gibson, a veteran from the first Persian Gulf War, by Jesus Arevalo, who was an officer with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department until they “fired” him one week before announcing that he would be collecting $30,000/yr. for the rest of his life, because murdering Stanley had caused him to be stressed out.

While researching the submission, I found an article from shortly after Kenneth Stafford was shot. The video from that article is embedded below. The article is a little vague on details, but includes this statement from the police:

“According to Washoe County Officials, while officers were attempting to negotiate with Stafford, officers opened fire. Authorities have not said what prompted police to shoot him, that’s still under investigation.”

PTSD is becoming an epidemic among veterans.

PTSD is becoming an epidemic among veterans.

To say the least, that leaves a lot of questions about why “officers opened fire,” especially when the police have a tendency to claim the people they shot were making some sort of threatening gesture or movement immediately after they kill someone. Other questions brought up in the video include why Stafford’s wife (who states that she begged them not to hurt him during the 911 call), mother, and a very close family friend were prevented from talking to him.

Another article, from June of 2014, references the final report from the DA (which they “forgot” to notify the family of) and provides an explanation that is a little (but not much) less questionable. In the report, the DA declared Kenneth Stafford’s shooting justified, in part based on the commonly used “Argument from Authority” (I.E. you’re not a cop, so you don’t know) and partly because all five cops shot at Kenneth:

According to reports, Kenneth Stafford, an active military member on leave, left the home he was visiting in Sparks with a shotgun. 11 minutes after police made contact with the 27 year old Army soldier, officers say negotiations weren’t successful.

In the final report Washoe County District Attorney, Richard Gammick determined the shooting to be justified under all applicable laws.

Stafford’s wife, Aimee doesn’t accept that decision, “I don’t see anything about that situation that was justifiable, um he was shot 15, 14 or 15 times. There’s no need for that ad the places he was shot, there’s no need for that.”

The autopsy report reveals 14 bullets hit Stafford, in his forehead, neck, chest, abdomen, ankle, knee and thigh.

Gammick says, “The officers have to make a call. Unless you’ve warn the badge, unless you’ve been out there and confronted people with weapons, you don’t understand that those decisions are made in split seconds, it’s not something you can 20/20 hindsight and spend the next four months analyzing.”

Prior to officers opening fire, reports indicate that police requested a less lethal device, “Officers requested a 40mm launcher, which would have had a mid-range potential solution,” says Sparks Police Chief Brian Allen.

That device was never used and officers say Stafford escalated his behavior “to the point of quickly turning towards the officers in the backyard in a manner such as to point the shotgun at them.”

Calling the cops can get someone killed

Calling the cops can get someone killed

Sparks Police Chief Brian Allen says the audio and video captured that day illustrates that all five shooting officers reacted simultaneously firing 22 shots, 14 of them hitting Stafford.

“The fact that all the officers on scene perceived the same thing at the same moment really they all took independent and justifiable actions against Mr. Stafford. The fact that there are 22 rounds, if you take the number of officers involved it’s a relatively low number of rounds per officer,” says Sparks Police Chief Brian Allen.

Another thing revealed within that article is that the cops who shot Kenneth Stafford that day were given awards for doing so, something that had been a fairly trendy practice with cases of questionable shootings for a while. That has kinda tailed off lately though, after it became a point of criticism, for what should be obvious reasons.


Note: This is the statement received from Kenneth Stafford’s mother with the only editing being some obvious spelling and punctuation mistakes and the insertion of paragraph breaks where appropriate. Any legal or factual claims made within the block quotes are solely attributable to Ms. Calgrove and have not been verified by anyone involved with NVCopBlock.org or CopBlock.org.

kenny-and-fam-at-the-space-needle

Kenneth J. Stafford and his family

My son, SPC Kenneth J. Stafford, was being treated for PTSD at his duty station Joint Base Lewis McChord in Fort Lewis, Washington. He came home with his family on leave around the 4th of July, which was the 1 year anniversary of his brother in law’s murder that the police still haven’t solved. They are trying to say it was gang related, because of the area he lived in and the people he hung around.

My son and his family were pulled over a couple of times in the first week they where home and harassed by the Reno police, because they were in the area and the cops knew who they were. Then with the Travon Martin case and the fireworks my son kept getting angrier and angrier. I have never seen him so angry in his life. I didn’t know what PTSD was until he came home and I looked it up. Only because I asked his wife what was going on and she told me about it, but she said she didn’t know what it was either. Here she is living with him and seeing the changes in him and she didn’t know what it was.

He was in contact with his doctor for the first week he was here and things weren’t as bad as the last few days of his life. Then, his phone broke and he couldn’t call his doctor anymore. Prior to that, he was calling him four or five times a day. I told his wife she needed to call his Sergeant or doctor and let them know how bad he was getting and needed help, but she said she didn’t have the numbers. I told her to get on line and look them up on their phone bill. Then she said she didn’t want him mad at her. I told her do you want him mad at you or dead. She never called them.

Kenneth Stafford's Birthday was Aug. 17th

Kenneth Stafford’s Birthday was Aug. 17th

On the morning that he was killed July 11, 2013 he had been up for about 72 hours and was getting paranoid. He asked me for a gun. I told him I didn’t own one and asked him why he needed one. He said he wanted it for protection. I asked him protection from what and he just said, “do you have one or not?” I called the VA hospital to try to get help they told me because he wasn’t in their system we needed to bring him in or call the police and let them know what was going on and then they could bring him in. The VA convinced me the cops were trained and wouldn’t hurt him.

I called his wife and told her what they said she said he was calm and eating lunch and watching a movie with his girls.  However, 15 minutes later she called me and said he had a gun and that she had called 911. He didn’t threaten her with it was just showing it to her and she freaked out screaming and then he got mad and started walking down the street. The cops found him 3 blocks away in a backyard by himself.

I drove down to where they were and asked the cops to let me talk to him, but they wouldn’t let me. Instead, they lied to me and said there Sparks  Policewas a military negotiator with him. They asked me his name and race. I said, “he is mixed” and Deena a friend of  Kenny’s wife, Aimee, yelled “he’s black, they consider him black.” I didn’t understand why they would ask his race. A few minutes, later a cop ran up to me saying Kenny wanted a cigarette. Before the cop got halfway back with the cigarette, about 10 cops opened fired and shot and killed him.

The Washoe County Sheriff Office is the department handling the investigation. It has currently been over 10 months and we still haven’t got any answers. I don’t know if we ever will, but his wife is still calling three times a week. We are not going away. The army did a investigation, but they haven’t told us anything either. The cops keep telling us its an open investigation,but I don’t think they will ever close it because they knew they where in the wrong killing my son. I feel cops shouldn’t be investigating cops. We need that changed. We need a civilian investigation board. The VA needs to be able to help whether or not they are in their system. Wen people call for help they need help right away.

All we want is answers to why the cops feel they needed to kill him why then couldn’t of disarmed him tasered him or something else. The cops need to be retrained and held accountable for their actions. Something needs be be done and they need to be stopped they aren’t any better than a criminal.

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Sheriff Claims Open Carry of Guns is Illegal in Reno, Nevada (Anonymous Submission)

Open Carry Gun Rights Nevada Second Amendment Restrictions Laws

This was recently received, via the submission form, from an open carry advocate in Reno who wishes to remain anonymous. It recounts his encounter with a member of the Washoe County Sheriff’s Department during a traffic stop in Reno, NV. More importantly, it addresses some questions that arose due to the fact that this particular police officer was under the impression that openly carrying a gun in Reno is illegal (spoiler: it’s very legal). Additional comments and reaction is included below.

I’ve made some spelling, grammar, and punctuation corrections, as well as adding links throughout for informational purposes, but in terms of content, this is the story in its entirety as received:

I moved here about a year ago and have been open carrying in Reno, Nevada since I arrived, never had much trouble had a lot of people come up to me and ask about it.So, today I decided to register and post (on NVCopBlock.org) because on the way home from moving stuff out of storage we got pulled over by a sheriff on a motorcycle. He gave us a ticket for my derpy friend not having his registration on him, but otherwise everything went fine.

We immediately told him we were both armed and open carrying. He didn’t even draw or look to worried, just told us to put our hands on the dash. Then three seconds later, told us to get out and switch the license plates around because he had the registration sticker on the front plates not the back so we did that while he was issuing the ticket.

Open Carry is Completely Legal and Unrestricted in Nevada

Afterwards, he gave us the ticket and asked us why we were open carrying and then proceeded to laugh when we told him it was our right and its for our own protection etc., etc…He mocked us and said we should just relax and enjoy life sometimes…(Whatever that means?) I then replied, ”well we can’t exactly carry you around with us 24 hours a day and 7 days a week sir.”

We bantered back-n-forth a bit and then, when we were about to leave, he said ”If I really wanted to be an ass, I could cite you for open carrying in Reno, because the Reno city ordinance overrides the state law about open carrying in the state of Nevada.” He then went on to tell us we should look it up and probably not open carry anymore and kept saying ”he was pretty sure it overrides the state ordinance.”

When he said that it came off VERY threatening and I wanted to start an argument right then and there, but that probably wouldn’t of been the best idea…

Artist Rendering of the Person who Submitted this Story

I got his name and badge id…if I can do anything with it…So I started googling….and I’ve researched the laws here A LOT before I even started open carrying…every time I hear something I always look it up…but for a sheriff to bring some BS city of Reno code that overrides the constitution and state law made me research some more…and that’s how I found this thread and I’ve since printed up 10 of your excellent pamphlets! Thanks!

I’m 99.99% certain that he is incorrect…and please correct me if I’m wrong…but how do police, cops, sheriffs, whatever not know the law? This is mind boggling….

ALSO what should I do with a officer who DOESN’T know the law and tries to do something about me legally carrying ?

I wish I would of recorded the whole ordeal…isn’t there like a hotline I can call and it records my stuff? and then I can download the call on my computer?

As stated earlier, it is very much legal to open carry in Nevada, which of course includes Reno. I regards to Reno law taking precedence over state laws, nothing could be further from the truth. The first problem with that idea is that there aren’t any Reno statutes prohibiting open carrying of firearms. The second flaw (and the reason for the first one) is that the State of Nevada specifically restricts local jurisdictions from passing gun laws that impose more severe restrictions on gun rights than those imposed by state law.

NRS 244.364, NRS 268.418, and NRS 269.222 state that the legislature reserves to itself the right to regulate the transfer, sale, purchase, possession, ownership, transportation, registration and licensing of firearms and ammunition in Nevada, and that no county, city or town respectively may infringe upon these rights. (emphasis added)

In relation to the Constitution, we’re unfortunately at the mercy of whoever is interpreting it and in the case of gun laws the Supreme Court interpreted it to mean that states have a right to restrict how and where citizens may exercise the Second Amendment . Which is why there are varying degrees of legality for openly carrying firearms throughout the different states.

Fortunately for those of us living in Nevada though, our state has one of the most liberal (in the literal sense) applications of gun laws. In fact, with the exception of the requirement to register guns in Clark County (which has been eliminated since this incident happened and never applied to Reno, regardless) there are no restrictions on open carry within Nevada.

However, less fortunate for us is the reality that it really isn’t that unusual for “police, cops, sherriffs, whatever” to not know the laws that they are planning to enforce and often there’s little or nothing we can do about it. In answer to the question of what you should do when confronted with a heavily armed government employee that doesn’t understand gun laws, my advice would be to assert your rights, while attempting to avoid a confrontation that could go very wrong. When in doubt, the safest bet is to wait it out and then file a complaint after the fact (that’s where that name and badge number come into play). Sometimes it can actually make a difference.

And of course, we advocate always recording any interaction that you have for police to create a unbiased record of exactly what happened and why. I’m not personally aware of any service that records  downloadable audio, but Bambuser.com has put out a great app that allows you to record and stream live video from your cell phone that is instantly posted to the internets and therefore can’t be erased or tampered with if the phone is confiscated.

Then get that video to us

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Help Wanted! Contribute To Nevada Cop Block

Click this Image to find out how you can contribute to NVCopBlock.org

There are many ways you can join Nevada Cop Block and help contribute to our mission to ensure accountability for police crimes and violence. Among many other things, you can submit your own personal story or video involving the police, share a link to a story or video you’ve come across somewhere else on the internet, or invite us to an event you or someone you know is hosting that is related to issues involving the police and/or the judicial system.

You can also become involved on a more direct level in several ways. If you are a writer and are interested in police issues, I’d be happy to talk to you about posting on the site. If you would like to be involved in going out and doing copwatching and filming the police, we’d be happy to discuss joining you and posting any news worthy video that results. Similarly, if you are doing some sort of event and you’d like to have someone from our group involved, we’d be happy to discuss that with you. We’re particularly interested in events that encourage people to film the police and that help familiarize people with their rights.

We’re located in Las Vegas and as a result we have better access to and awareness of stories in Southern Nevada. We don’t, however, limit ourselves to Las Vegas or even Nevada. Whether you live in Nevada or not, I’d be happy to have you contribute in any manner mentioned above and possibly in many other ways that you may want to suggest.

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