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Viral Facebook Live Video Shows Ohio Man Being Beaten and Punched During Arrest

Euclid Ohio Police Brutality Arrest Beating

A viral Facebook Live video shows a man being violently arrested in Euclid, Ohio.

A live-streamed video that was making its way around Facebook on August 12th (2017) shows a man being violently arrested in Euclid, OH. (Note: many of the people sharing the video had for some reason misidentified the location as Edina, MN.) As of right now, there aren’t a lot of details outside of what can be seen on the video. (That video is embedded below.)

Later in the evening, the Euclid Police Department did release a statement in which they said that the cops pulled a man named Richard Hubbard III, who is from Cleveland, over for a traffic violation. They then decided to arrest him for some unspecified reason. Euclid is a suburb of Cleveland.

According to the EPD statement, Hubbard refused to turn around and face away from them when the police officers ordered him to. Initially, there are two cops involved in the beating. Eventually, at least three other cops arrive and begin helping handcuff Hubbard.

The cop, that can be seen hitting Hubbard numerous times, including in the back of his head, has not been identified yet. Currently, he is on paid vacation while his co-workers perform an “investigation.”

A woman who can be seen recording with her cell phone apparently was arrested also once the other cops arrived.

Below, is the statement from the Euclid police, via Fox8.com in Cleveland:

Euclid police released a statement about the incident, saying that just before 10:30 a.m., an officer pulled over Richard Hubbard, 25, of Cleveland, for a moving/traffic violation near 240 East 228th Street.

Hubbard was ordered out of the car told to face away from the police as he was taken into custody. Police say that Hubbard ignored that order and began to physically resist as the officer took him into custody.

The violent struggle, pictured below, lasted for over 3 minutes.

Update: Partial dash cam video (also embedded below) has been released, which is included as an update to the previously cited Fox8.com post. However, it’s still not very clear even on that video why the police saw Hubbard as a threat when they initially decided to arrest him.

According to the new statement from police, Hubbard was being arrested for not having a license. In addition, although it isn’t shown on either video, the statement says that Hubbard was tased. (The taser can be seen being thrown onto the street after it apparently wasn’t effective.)

They also state that they thought he was going to run, but he appears to be boxed in between the car, the open car door, and the officer who would later assault him. It doesn’t seem like he would have much of an opportunity to run, even if that was his intention.

Bystander Video

Local News Report With Dash Cam Video

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Update: Sixteen Arlington TX Cops Allowed to Resign Instead of Facing Charges for Writing Fake Tickets

In December, I posted about what was at the time 12 Arlington Texas cops who had either been fired or resigned for turning in fake tickets they had written to people that didn’t actually exist, oftentimes using the same license plate number in the imaginary citations. Their actions were discovered when department supervisors attempted to review dashcam video from the stops. That footage obviously didn’t exist, since they weren’t really stopping anyone. Apparently, the reason behind these phantom traffic stops was in order to keep up with department quotas.

Via the Star-Telegram:

They are accused of lying about traffic stop reports, tampering with governmental records, and conduct unbecoming a police officer, the press release said.

Their cases have been forwarded to the Tarrant County District Attorney’s Office, which will determine if criminal charges will be filed.

Two of the fired officers are also accused of not being truthful in their testimony with internal affairs investigators…

The accused officers reported on their in-car computers that they had made a traffic stop at a particular address but did not give any names, a source close to the investigation had said.

The allegedly falsified stops were discovered when supervisors could not find accompanying dash cam video of the stops.

Officers are required to report driver demographics, the reason for the traffic stop, whether an arrest occurred and whether a search was conducted during the stop, said Cook, the police spokesman. That data is used to compile the department’s annual racial-profiling report.

Earlier this month, it was announced that all 16 of the officers originally suspected of writing fake tickets have been given plea deals to either avoid being indicted or have previously filed indictments dismissed in exchange for resigning and giving up their peace officer licenses, thereby preventing them from working as police officers again.

Via Fox4News.com:

Roughly nine months after 16 police officers were placed on leave during an investigation into fake traffic stops, all of them will avoid prosecution.

Eleven of the officers agreed to plea bargains early on and gave up their peace officer licenses to avoid indictments.  Five of them were actually indicted but later took the same deal to have the indictments dismissed.

“Dane Peterson, Dace Warren, Brandon Jones and Chris McCright were indicted for tampering with a governmental record in multiple indictments,” the district attorney’s office said in a statement. “Chris Dockery was indicted in one multiple count indictment. All of the officers agreed to give up their TCOLE licenses, and we have dismissed the indictments against each other.”

There’s no mention of the investigation that should be taking place into the illegal ticket quotas imposed by the department that apparently led to the fake ticket scandal in the first place. Of course, that might be the reason that all these cops who were caught red handed breaking several laws got a deal which prevents them from needing to testify in court about it during their trials.

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Deputy at #DAPL Protests Passed Out in Running Police Vehicle After Over 15 Vodka Shots and Prescription Meds

Deputy Ryan Fowler of the St. Croix County (WI) Sheriff’s Office reportedly had consumed between 12 and 26 shots of vodka within a three hour period before he was arrested in October. Further investigation revealed that he had also taken prescription medications prior to drinking that night. He also admitted that it was possible he had drank even more alcohol in his hotel room.

Deputy Fowler and three other St. Croix officers had been assigned to duty as part of the police response to the protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation outside of Bismark North Dakota at the time. As a result of the arrest, they were all four sent back to Wisconsin.

Fowler was discovered by Bismark police passed out in his police K-9 vehicle, which was running and in drive at the time. Officers who arrested him were investigating a report that he had been involved in an altercation (possibly with another cop) and subsequently stolen a sweatshirt from a man who had previously woken him up after seeing him asleep in his squad car.

In spite of the fact he was caught in a police vehicle, Deputy Fowler initially lied to the officers, stating his name was “John.” Upon searching the squad car, his real name was discovered once Fowler’s ID, as well as the stolen sweatshirt, was found. Eventually, after a paid vacation of about a month and a half, Fowler was allowed to resign instead of being fired.

Via the Twin Cities Pioneer Press:

According to an internal investigation report completed by St. Croix County Sheriff’s Office Lt. Cathy Borgschatz:

Bismarck police were dispatched at 11:34 p.m. Oct. 12, after a gas station attendant called on behalf of another man.

That man, identified as Daylan ChasingHawk, reported a fight at the Comfort Inn Hotel, where he claimed he witnessed a deputy drunk inside his squad car. The deputy stole ChasingHawk’s sweatshirt, according to a 911 call.

An officer arrived to find a St. Croix County sheriff’s squad car in the driving lane at the hotel. A look inside revealed a sleeping man in the driver’s seat and a police dog inside. The car was running.

The officer “noticed that the squad was in drive and Deputy Fowler had his foot on the brake,” the report states. She and other officers had to beat on the car’s window for more than a minute before Fowler stirred.

Fowler stepped out of the car and smelled strongly of alcohol. When asked his name by the officer, he told her it was “John.” Officers later learned his actual name after finding his driver’s license inside the car.

A sweatshirt was also found inside the vehicle. Other Bismarck officers were interviewed during the investigation, including one who relayed ChasingHawk’s account: That he encountered Fowler asleep in the squad car, shook him until he woke and received an offer from Fowler to buy his sweatshirt for $5.

“The deputy drove off in his squad car, with Daylan’s sweater and hadn’t paid Daylan the $5,” according to the officer’s statement.

Fowler was then run through field sobriety tests, some of which he failed, some of which he didn’t complete.

Fowler was arrested and taken to the Bismarck Police Department, where a breath test revealed a 0.23 blood-alcohol concentration.

Asked by Bismarck police how much he had to drink that night, Fowler said he had three drinks in the hotel bar and one in his room, prompting the officer to ask if he had more after he got back to his room. “Deputy Fowler stated that it was possible,” the report states…

Borgschatz learned the incident was preceded by an incident in Fowler’s hotel room at about 10:30 p.m. Oct. 12, when a Dane County (Wis.) deputy heard loud sounds coming from inside the room. The deputy later went to the room and told the men inside — a K-9 handler and another officer — to quiet down.

St. Croix County Sheriff’s Deputy Ryan Kelly, also a member of the four-person assignment, had earlier told Borgschatz that he and Fowler were in the room playing with Fowler’s police dog, Dugan, when they were told to be quiet.

“It seemed likely that Deputy Fowler, Deputy Kelly and the canine were only playing and the disturbance was due to the playful conduct with the dog and not any altercation,” the report states.

The Dane County deputy said as he was going back to his room, he saw one of the room’s occupants heading toward the exit with a dog.

Borgschatz later interviewed Fowler about the incident.

He said he took medication before going to the hotel bar, where he had “four or five” vodka-Red Bull drinks. Fowler said he had set an alarm for 9 p.m. that was going to be his reminder to go to bed, but he hit the snooze button since he had a full drink in front of him. He said he and Kelly stayed for another drink after that.

Fowler said that was the last thing he remembered, but noted that he didn’t feel drunk at the time. He said his first recollection after that was looking at paperwork inside the Bismarck police station. The medication, he later said in the interview, was a mitigating factor in the incident.

“Fowler is excusing his behavior because of a new prescribed medication,” the report states. “He was not able to admit that being a 0.234 affected [sic] his decision-making or memory. He blamed the bartender for getting him intoxicated.”

Borgschatz, who inspected the bar pours — 50/50 mixes, she reported — at the Comfort Inn as part of her investigation, concluded that Fowler had between 12 and 26 shots of vodka in less than three hours.

“It is likely he had more than 15 shots of vodka,” the report states.

The report outlines 12 department violations Fowler committed, ranging from refusal to follow orders to breaking the law.

As part of the internal investigation Deputy Fowler maintained that he should not have been arrested for some unexplained reason:

“Deputy Fowler stated he believes he should have never been arrested but wasn’t able to articulate what made the incident an unwarranted arrest,” the report states. “He only stated the whole situation should have been taken into account.”

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Philadelphia Taxpayers Forced to Pay $4.4 Million to Innocent Delivery Man Undercover Cops Ambushed

Last week, the Philadelphia Police Department agreed to the largest settlement in the history of the city to pay off an innocent man that two undercover cops shot at fourteen times. In April of 2014, Philippe Holland was delivering food when Officers Mitchell Farrell and Kevin Hanvey ran at him without ever identifying themselves as police officers.

Holland, having no reason to know they were cops and seeing that one of them was holding a gun, believed he was being robbed and tried to escape in his car. In spite of it specifically being against policy to do so, Farrell and Hanvey used the excuse that they “feared for their lives” from the car being used as a weapon to open fire on Holland. As a result, Holland, who was twenty years old at the time, now suffers from a permanent seizure disorder and still has bullet fragments lodged in his brain.

In spite of witness statements that contradict the two officers’ story, the district attorney (not at all surprisingly) declined to press any charges against them. Instead, they’ve been given a paid vacation for the past two years, while the slap on the wrist they will eventually receive from the department remains “pending.”

Via Philly.com:

It is the largest settlement in a police shooting case in the city’s history, according to Philadelphia Law Department records.

Then-Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey said shortly after the shooting that Officers Mitchell Farrell and Kevin Hanvey had fired at the wrong man.

On Friday, the mayor’s office called the shooting “an unfortunate, regrettable series of events.”

“We will strive to ensure that tragedies such as this do not happen again in our city,” City Solicitor Sozi Pedro Tulante said in the statement.

Philippe Holland was delivering a cheeseburger to a house on the 5100 block of Willows Avenue in West Philadelphia on April 22, 2014, as police responded to reports of gunshots nearby.

In a deposition, he said he saw Farrell and Hanvey approaching him and thought he was about to get robbed. He slipped into his car through the passenger door, he said – and that’s when one officer shined a light into the car and Holland saw a gun in the other’s hand.

He told police that Farrell and Hanvey never identified themselves as police officers. He said that he panicked and tried to pull out of his parking spot – and that the two men opened fire on him, hitting him in the head and body.

At the time, it was against police regulations for officers to fire at a moving vehicle unless someone inside the car was threatening them or someone else with some form of deadly force other than the vehicle itself.

Hanvey and Farrell told investigators they approached Holland because they saw him walking past a Chinese restaurant on 51st Street and asked a witness on the street where the gunshots she’d heard had come from. They said the woman had pointed toward Holland and said the shots came from where he was walking.

But the woman later told police investigators she had only pointed toward the Chinese restaurant, and didn’t mention a man at all.

Hanvey and Farrell insisted that they told Holland they were police and that he drove his car toward them, making them fear for their lives.

Holland, a student at Delaware County Community College, was left with a permanent seizure disorder and has bullet fragments in his brain, according to his attorney, Tom Kline, who announced the settlement Friday.

The District Attorney’s Office declined to press charges in the case. According to police documents Kline provided to the Inquirer and the Daily News, the department’s Use of Force Review Board concluded that Farrell and Hanvey had violated department policy, though the board did not specify a punishment for that violation.

A police spokesman said that the two have been on administrative duty since the shooting, and that “discipline is still pending.”

The department could not say whether the officers will return to the street.

At least the taxpayers of Philadelphia get to pay for this “unfortunate, regrettable series of events,” while the two officers actually responsible for it have had plenty of time to sit home getting paid to think about what they did. That certainly should ensure that “tragedies such as this do not happen again” in their city.

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Nine Texas Cops Fired Three Others Have Resigned After Writing Tickets For Imaginary Traffic Stops

Back in May, fifteen police officers from Arlington Texas were given paid vacations after it was discovered they had been falsifying traffic stops in order to meet department ticket quotas. Now nine of those officers have been fired and another three have quit as a result of an internal affairs investigation. The remaining three and another who was later added remain on paid suspension while the investigation continues.

The traffic stop irregularities came to light when department supervisors attempted to review dash cam footage from the phantom stops. Once it was discovered that no dash camera video existed, a wider internal probe was initiated. Another “red flag” that raised suspicion was that the same license plate number was used for multiple stops.

In the end, it was determined that no stops had been made, nor had any citizens been contacted by the officers during the reported stops. The results of the internal investigation have been forwarded to the Tarrant County District Attorney’s Office for a determination of whether they will receive a painful slap on the wrist or some sort of imaginary punishment for their imaginary actions.

Via the Star-Telegram:

They are accused of lying about traffic stop reports, tampering with governmental records, and conduct unbecoming a police officer, the press release said.

Their cases have been forwarded to the Tarrant County District Attorney’s Office, which will determine if criminal charges will be filed.

Two of the fired officers are also accused of not being truthful in their testimony with internal affairs investigators.

Police Chief Will Johnson declined to comment Friday night.

“These allegations are serious and represent conduct that is not consistent with departmental expectations,” Johnson said in a statement at the time.

Mayor Jeff Williams and several City Council members did not return requests late Friday for comment on the case.

Councilwoman Sheri Capehart said she couldn’t comment because it’s “a personnel matter.”

The accused officers reported on their in-car computers that they had made a traffic stop at a particular address but did not give any names, a source close to the investigation had said.

The allegedly falsified stops were discovered when supervisors could not find accompanying dash cam video of the stops.

Officers are required to report driver demographics, the reason for the traffic stop, whether an arrest occurred and whether a search was conducted during the stop, said Cook, the police spokesman. That data is used to compile the department’s annual racial-profiling report.

While also maintaining that the investigation was “flawed,” the attorney for two of the officers, Randy Moore, also claims that the Arlington Police Department has a quota system that officers are required to maintain. According to Moore, this quota system is responsible for the falsified traffic stops that he claims didn’t actually happen.
In spite of the department’s denials of the quotas’ existence, one of the stated motivations for the scheme was the desire to do well on performance evaluations. Of course, it’s not at all unusual for police department nationwide to institute quotas under some other name and pretend that they aren’t actually quotas and/or to have unannounced quotas that are enforced by supervisors.
In addition, there was also a recent case not far from Arlington in which four Houston police officers concocted a scheme involving traffic tickets to fraudulently get paid overtime for testifying in court by naming each other as witnesses in traffic tickets they wrote. So, it’s not at all unheard of for Road Pirates to realize that some of that revenue they are generating could belong to them personally if they played their (marked) cards right.
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