Tag Archives: Ohio

CopBlock Founder Ademo Freeman Preparing to Challenge Drug War in Court Jan. 11th During Marijuana Arrest Trial

Marijuana Possession Trial Ademo Freeman Adam Mueller

“When I go to trial I’m not asking to not be punished. I’m asking not to be punished anymore. I’ve done nearly 50 days in jail. I’ve paid tens of thousands of dollars in legal fees, lost a year’s worth of time and have basically been on probation for a year” – Ademo Freeman

The following video and post was originally published at CopBlock.org by Asa J under the title, “CopBlock Founder Ademo Freeman To Square Off In Court Against Drug War.” Obviously, it refers to Ademo’s arrest last year in Ohio on charges of possession of the scary, dangerous “drug” marijuana, that most people could not care less about at this point. More specifically, it relates to the trial for those charges that begins next week, on January 11th.

Barring some sort of eleventh hour plea deal with a sentence of time served (he has stated he would not agree to any deal that requires additional jail/prison time), Ademo will be facing up to six years in prison and fines of $20,000 if he is found guilty. More than likely, his freedom hinges on someone in the jury exercising their “Jury Nullificationrights and ruling based on the morality of the War on (Some) Drugs and the prosecution of victimless crimes, rather than the letter of the law.

Note: If you have videos, stories, upcoming events/protests, or personal interactions with the police (and/or “justice” system) that you would like to share, send them to us and we will do everything we can to bring it to the attention of the world. In addition, you can visit the Nevada Cop Block resources section for information and links to the rights of citizens when dealing with police, during which you should always be filming.

CopBlock Founder Ademo Freeman To Square Off In Court Against Drug War

Next week, CopBlock co-founder Ademo Freeman will square off against those wishing to send him to prison for peacefully traveling with medical marijuana in a state that also recognizes legal medicinal use of the plant.

You heard that right. Due to the lack of legal framework surrounding medical use of cannabis in Ohio (even though the state passed medical cannabis in 2016), Ademo faces up to six years in prison and fines of $20,000 when he stands trail on January 11 for possession of his medicine.

As such, Ohio law stipulates that the Board of Pharmacy attempt to negotiate and enter into reciprocity agreements with other medical marijuana states before allowing use of their medicine. Before entering into an agreement with another state, the Board must determine that the state meet certain criteria.

First, the eligibility requirements imposed by the other state in order to obtain a registry identification card have to be substantially comparable to Ohio’s requirements. Second, the other state must also recognize patient or caregiver registration and identification cards issued in Ohio. Ohio has no such agreement with Colorado, the state Ademo obtained his medical cannabis card in, nor any other state for that matter. In fact, the politicians of Ohio have dragged their feet for two years on this issue depriving who knows how many from receiving medical cannabis and killing countless others.

Ademo is no stranger to the criminal justice system. Shortly after founding CopBlock with activist and friend Pete Eyre in 2010 the two were part of a group of activists arrested for recording public officials at the Franklin County, Massachusetts jail.

The following year Ademo was arrested for wiretapping and faced 21 years in prison after video surfaced from West High School in Manchester, New Hampshire showing a student being roughly pushed down onto a cafeteria table by police detective Darren Murphy.

Ademo recorded telephone conversations he had with a Manchester police captain, the West High principal and her assistant in attempt to bring attention to the incident. He represented himself in court and was sentenced to 90 days in jail and three years of probation. Those convictions were later thrown out by the New Hampshire Supreme Court however.

CopBlock is a decentralized organization made up of a diverse group of individuals united by their shared belief that “badges don’t grant extra rights,” CopBlock.org states. In this pursuit CopBlockers routinely draw attention to police brutality and corruption and are known for their controversial and sometimes intense encounters with police. Naturally, shining a light on the domestic enforcement arm of government attracts unwanted attention. In February, Ademo was arrested and charged with possession and trafficking marijuana and possession of hash oil in Warren County, Ohio.

According to WCPO, 24 pounds of marijuana and 26 vials of hash oil were found in Ademo’s car after he was pulled over by Ohio State Troopers for a missing license plate light. He was arraigned on a $75,000 bond.

From behind bars Ademo routinely spoke out about police accountability issues and problems with the criminal justice system. He was released from jail in March following a major bond reduction having refused a plea deal to serve one year in prison.

Ademo has long been a crusader against the drug war, an issue that routinely garners attention on the pages of CopBlock.org. An advocate of self-ownership and an opponent of victimless crime laws, it was in fact a 2004 marijuana conviction that ultimately led Ademo to co-found CopBlock.

Now, almost 14 years later, Ademo continues to stand up for his individual right to decide for himself what to put in his own body. Next Thursday he will stand trial in Warren County having refused another plea offer this week that would have resulted in a 36 month prison sentence suspended for 6 months in jail and three years probation.

In a live Facebook video on Friday Ademo explained why.

“I’m a medical marijuana patient, ” he said. “I held a valid medical marijuana card until December 17 of last year. Everything I was in possession of that day was my medicine.”

Having lived in Colorado for a short while Ademo decided to return to Ohio temporarily after his plans to make a permanent move to the state didn’t work out. Ademo and his spouse (at the time) had decided not to move his partner’s children so far from their biological father (who came back into his young childrens life) and instead set up a forever home in Michigan (another medical MJ state) after the kids finished school. The only problem was, Ademo never made it back. He was caged by state troopers in the Warren County jail for simply stepping over a line into an occupied territory that seriously needs to clarify its laws regarding the legal use of medicinal cannabis.

“While they say ‘trafficking,’ I had everything I owned in my car,” Ademo said. “There was no drug bust. There were no informants. This wasn’t done at a DUI [checkpoint], I didn’t sell weed to an undercover cop. That’s not my intention. I use weed for medical purposes and I merely had six months worth of medicine with me.”

Ademo has asked people to please call assistant prosecutor Chris Delnicki at the telephone number 513-695-1325 to voice their support. He has also asked friends to send character letters stating that jail isn’t the proper punishment for his so-called “crimes” to Delnicki and/or Judge Robert Peeler at the address: 520 Justice Drive Lebanon, Ohio 45036.

“I don’t believe that my actions deserve 36 months in prison,” Ademo said. “When I go to trial I’m not asking to not be punished. I’m asking not to be punished anymore. I’ve done nearly 50 days in jail. I’ve paid tens of thousands of dollars in legal fees, lost a year’s worth of time and have basically been on probation for a year. I believe that that’s enough for someone with a medical marijuana card.”

To hear more of Ademo’s thoughts on the case listen below:

Original Facebook Live Video:

Related Content on NVCopBlock.org:

Viral Facebook Live Video Shows Ohio Man Being Beaten and Punched During Arrest

Euclid Ohio Police Brutality Arrest Beating

A viral Facebook Live video shows a man being violently arrested in Euclid, Ohio.

A live-streamed video that was making its way around Facebook on August 12th (2017) shows a man being violently arrested in Euclid, OH. (Note: many of the people sharing the video had for some reason misidentified the location as Edina, MN.) As of right now, there aren’t a lot of details outside of what can be seen on the video. (That video is embedded below.)

Later in the evening, the Euclid Police Department did release a statement in which they said that the cops pulled a man named Richard Hubbard III, who is from Cleveland, over for a traffic violation. They then decided to arrest him for some unspecified reason. Euclid is a suburb of Cleveland.

According to the EPD statement, Hubbard refused to turn around and face away from them when the police officers ordered him to. Initially, there are two cops involved in the beating. Eventually, at least three other cops arrive and begin helping handcuff Hubbard.

The cop, that can be seen hitting Hubbard numerous times, including in the back of his head, has not been identified yet. Currently, he is on paid vacation while his co-workers perform an “investigation.”

A woman who can be seen recording with her cell phone apparently was arrested also once the other cops arrived.

Below, is the statement from the Euclid police, via Fox8.com in Cleveland:

Euclid police released a statement about the incident, saying that just before 10:30 a.m., an officer pulled over Richard Hubbard, 25, of Cleveland, for a moving/traffic violation near 240 East 228th Street.

Hubbard was ordered out of the car told to face away from the police as he was taken into custody. Police say that Hubbard ignored that order and began to physically resist as the officer took him into custody.

The violent struggle, pictured below, lasted for over 3 minutes.

Update: Partial dash cam video (also embedded below) has been released, which is included as an update to the previously cited Fox8.com post. However, it’s still not very clear even on that video why the police saw Hubbard as a threat when they initially decided to arrest him.

According to the new statement from police, Hubbard was being arrested for not having a license. In addition, although it isn’t shown on either video, the statement says that Hubbard was tased. (The taser can be seen being thrown onto the street after it apparently wasn’t effective.)

They also state that they thought he was going to run, but he appears to be boxed in between the car, the open car door, and the officer who would later assault him. It doesn’t seem like he would have much of an opportunity to run, even if that was his intention.

Bystander Video

Local News Report With Dash Cam Video

Update: Second Mistrial Declared; Cincinnati Cop Ray Tensing Gets Away With Murder of Sam Dubose

For the second time, a jury has stated that it was deadlocked and unable to reach a decision on charges filed against University of Cincinnati Police Officer Ray Tensing for the July 2015 murder of Sam Dubose. (See videos embedded below for body camera footage of that murder.) The jury initially indicated this morning that it was unable to reach a decision, but were told to go back and continue deliberating. Later this afternoon they returned and stated they were still deadlocked. As a result, Hamilton County Judge Leslie Ghiz has declared a mistrial.

Although it hasn’t been officially announced yet, there won’t be a third trial. So that effectively means Tensing has officially joined the ever expanding club of police officers who have gotten away with murder, including three just this week alone (Tensing, Milwaukee Police Officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown, and St. Paul Police Officer Jeronimo Yanez).

Of course, in order to have their killings declared justified all police officers need to do is state that they “feared for my life” and in order to get a mistrial they just need one of the twelve members of a jury to buy that rationalization. So that bar is incredibly low and that’s mostly by design. The system itself is tilted heavily in their favor and those running that system not only are their friends and co-workers, but have the further incentive of self preservation to push it even further in that direction.

In Tensing’s case, he claimed that he was in danger of being run over by Dubose as he attempted to drive away from a traffic stop the University of Cincinnati police officer had initiated because of a missing front license plate.

Via NBC News:

Tensing asked DuBose for his driver’s license and registration, which he failed to provide. The officer then ordered him to step out of his car and tried to open the door, but DuBose refused. The car began to pull away

With one hand still inside the car, Tensing yelled, “Stop! Stop!” before firing his gun at DuBose, striking him in the head. The car then began traveling out of control before coming to a stop.

Tensing’s bodycam captured the incident.

The men had a conversation for about one minute and 50 seconds before it escalated with Tensing and DuBose in a struggle. Within just a few seconds, Tensing fired his gun.

Two other officers were on scene, and their body cameras captured other angles of the shooting’s aftermath.

Those alternate angles captured by the other officers on the scene, as well as testimony from experts who examined those videos, contradicted Tensing’s claims that he was being dragged by, and in danger of being run over by, Dubose’s car.

It’s also been questioned whether the stop for something as trivial as a front license plate was merely an excuse used to justify a racially motivated profiling of Dubose. Officer Tensing’s unusually frequent history of traffic stops (when compared to other University of Cincinnati police officers) and the high percentage of minorities involved in those stops bolsters those claims.

Of course, the judges, prosecutors, and media are usually on the side of the cops and the general public is taught from the day they are born to believe cops are heroes that never lie or do anything bad. So it’s not that hard for them to at least find that one juror who will refuse to find a cop guilty, regardless of the actual facts presented during a trial. That’s a big part of why it’s almost impossible to convict a police officer regardless of the actual facts on the rare occasions when they get caught doing something outrageous enough to get charged in the first place.

False Imprisonment: Its Increasing Frequency and the Huge Cost It Imposes on Society

The following post was shared with the CopBlock Network anonymously by a reader, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

If you have a video, personal story involving police misconduct and/or abuse, or commentary about a law enforcement related news story, we would be happy to have you submit it. You can find some advice on how to get your submission published on the CopBlock Network within this post.

Police Abuses on the Rise

It’s no secret that police brutality and misconduct has been on the rise recently with cases in the news like Eric Garner who was suffocated in a choke hold by police and killed for illegally selling cigarettes. Similarly, a 12-year-old boy Tamir Rice was shot and killed after playing with a toy gun in the park. The level of uneasiness between police officers and citizens has hit an all-time high and we see this unrest play out in society. Police brutality is not the only form of police misconduct- false arrest of citizens can be an excruciating experience that sends innocent people to prison for simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

For example, Chicago’s taxpayers have had to pay over $120 million for the racial torture committed by one police commander, Jon Burge. Part of the disconnect between officers and citizens is the unfairness in power and how that power is used. To add on to this, police are offered different treatment when it comes to false arrests or misconduct. Although Burge oversaw the torture of over 118 black men – which would typically lead to decades in prison – he was released in three-and-a-half years and sent to a halfway house. All the men he tortured remain behind bars.

Police officers were granted a Qualified Immunity Doctrine by the Supreme Court which essentially states that police officers are innocent of harm towards their suspects in most cases due to their risky and honorable line of work. The best intentions are seen to be associated with most police officers, but has that been the case recently?

Typically, false arrest from police officers falls into the police misconduct category, which can also encompass police brutality and wrongful death. According to the University of Michigan Law School’s National Registry of Exonerations report, 75% of homicide exonerations involved police misconduct. One widely publicized example of a wrongful arrest was James Bain, who was convicted of kidnapping and rape at the age of 18. He served 35 years for a vicious crime he did not commit. Although DNA evidence was tested and presented prior, he was refused further DNA testing from the courts until his fifth try in 2006. Although misidentification from eyewitnesses account for 75% of all convictions that are overturned by DNA evidence, Bain was wrongfully arrested and incarcerated by police.

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How Does False Imprisonment Affect the Public?

Some people may think that the police arrest people who they think are guilty of a crime, and if they are wrongfully arrested, they are quickly released and go about their happy lives. That is far from the truth in most cases where the arrest was outright wrong and unlawful. Many people who are falsely arrested fight back and sue the police officer who wronged them and because of this, the public is responsible for paying that fee.

Amount of Money City Taxpayers Have Paid for Police Misconduct:

  • Chicago: $521 million from 2004-2014
  • Cleveland: $8.2 million between 2004-2014
  • Denver: $12 million since 2011
  • Dallas: $6.6 million between 2011-2014
  • Los Angeles: $101 million between 2002-2011

For example, Robert Graham was arrested for disorderly conduct by a police officer who was stuck in traffic behind him. Due to the gridlock traffic in New York City, Graham was also stuck in traffic and unable to move. The police officers wrongfully arrested Graham due to the circumstances of the situation. Graham’s wrongfully arrested cases was one of the ones that contributed to New York taxpayers paying $18 million to pay back people who were wrongfully arrested by officers.

According to Jon Norinsberg, a false imprisonment attorney, New York city police may only legally arrest citizens if:

  1. The police have an arrest warrant.
  2. The police have probable cause that you committed a crime.
  3. You are interfering with a police investigation or arrest.
  4. The police believe you are a criminal attempting to flee a crime scene.

Why are Police Officers Getting Away with False Imprisonment?

The number of innocent people behind bars is the highest number it has ever been historically, so it is only natural to question the source – the police. Why has it become okay to so quickly convict people and rarely face punishment as a police officer for wrongfully arresting someone? The issue gets stickier when videos of police officers using excessive force and even killing citizens when they appeared to pose no threat. Are there consequences for that? Rarely.

Unfortunately, false arrests happen and can be scary to argue your case in front of a judge – especially because police are most often shielded by the Qualified Immunity Doctrine exercised by the Supreme Court. This is a protective order that is designed to protect police officers from facing punishments from their mistakes or unlawful actions. In theory, this Qualified Immunity Doctrine was originally designed to shield officers who are properly bringing justice to criminals and who handle situations appropriately – if someone is upset for getting arrested if they deserve it, well this doctrine will protect the police from this potential complaint or lawsuit. Since videos have been released of police officers using unnecessary excessive force on unarmed people, citizens are growing scared that officers are abusing this immunity from the Supreme Court to get away with their unjust behavior. This is where a disconnect lies between police officers and citizens.

Where is the Accountability From the Police?

Why is it that as a society we only started paying attention to police misconduct and false arrests when Netflix featured programs like Making a Murderer?

Police officers are designed to keep our communities safe. While most cops are heroes and upstanding citizens who work hard to protect our safety, those who entered the police force to unlawfully assert power over others and take advantage of their badge are getting more press in recent news. Although it’s an unfortunate circumstance, it is important to stay educated on what is happening in society to better educate yourself and to hopefully make a positive change.

Video Update: Ohio Cop Who Ran Stop Sign to Ticket Lyndhurst Man For Flipping Him Off

The following post and accompanying video were shared with the CopBlock Network by Dominic Fallon, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. This submission consists of a second video containing an update of a previous submission by Fallon. In that submission, Fallon stated that he had flipped a cop off, who then turned around and ran a stop sign while speeding himself in order to issue a speeding ticket in retaliation.

Date of Incident: October 10, 2016
Officers Involved: Sergeant Greg Traci – Badge #107, Officer Matt Eden – Badge #014, Officer David Boss – Badge #006
Department Involved: Lyndhurst (Ohio) Police Department
Department Facebook Page: Lyndhurst Police Dept.
Department Phone No.: (440) 473-5116

If you have a video, personal story involving police misconduct and/or abuse, or commentary about a law enforcement related news story, we would be happy to have you submit it. You can find some advice on how to get your submission published on the CopBlock Network within this post.

Click the banner to submit content to CopBlock.org

Click the banner to submit content to CopBlock.org

After I was ticketed for “speeding” in Lyndhurst, I decided to gather more video evidence that I also posted in the video update. I wanted to thank the creators of this organization for helping to shed light on the corruption throughout our justice system and I’m sorry it took so long for this update.

I do want to let people know that all cops are not bad, but like every other human on this planet, they do make bad decisions sometimes. Without this organization, I do not think I would have had the courage to go out and film government officials breaking the law.

Even though I was still charged for speeding, I am a man of my word and did state that I did travel no faster then 28. Maybe one day we will have a new law set across this country that would encourage officers to document and turn in the officers that do make these bad decisions and also be rewarded with some type of incentive.

Anyone that wants to see more videos in the future please subscribe to my YouTube channel.

– Dominic Fallon

The Original Video:

Cleveland Cop Who Previously Shot Unarmed Man, Allowed To Attend Rehab Instead Of Jail After Drug Arrest

A member of the Cleveland Police Gang Unit, who was involved in a 2015 shooting of an unarmed man that the department initially lied about, was later himself busted for drugs. However, instead of going to jail, he’s been given a deal that will allow him to go to rehab instead of having his guilty plea count as a conviction.

In the shooting, for which a lawsuit is set to go to trial soon, Detective Jon Periandri claimed that the man he shot during a drug bust, Joevon Dawson, had gotten out of a car with a gun in his hand. The other five Good Cops at the scene backed up his story and one of them also moved a bullet casing to support the claim. Even Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams got in on the act, making a statement to the press at the scene that Dawson was armed when he was shot.

However, information later released as part of the lawsuit indicated that the only gun recovered at the scene had been stored within the center console area on the inside of the vehicle. Investigators from the Ohio Attorney General’s Office Bureau of Criminal Investigation concluded that the gun could not have been used by Dawson.

Meanwhile, even as he was in the process of arresting and shooting people for drug crimes he was simultaneously buying drugs by the handful. In fact, evidence showed that he literally ordered drugs while on duty as part of the narcotics squad. Incidentally, his taste for prescription pain killers and heroin were uncovered after a drug bust that included the Brooklyn, Ohio Law Director and the son of the mayor of Parma, Ohio.

Via Cleveland.com:

Periandri would soon face criminal investigation for another incident that happened in the weeks before and after the shooting.

In October 2015, as investigators continued probing the Dawson shooting, local and federal authorities raided the Seven Hills home of Alfonso Yunis, a suspected drug dealer.

Police found Yunis counting and crushing pills at his house along with then-Brooklyn law director Scott Clausen and attorney Brian Byrne, son of Parma Mayor Mike Byrne.

All three were arrested. A subsequent tip from a confidential police informant and a search of Yunis’ cellphone turned up hundreds of text messages with a number that was later traced to Periandri, according to court records.

The messages appeared to be “criminal in nature” and showed Periandri, a detective in charge of investigating and arresting drug dealers, repeatedly requesting to buy prescription painkillers and heroin off of Yunis, and even agreeing to act as a middleman for some drug deals, according to a search warrant affidavit obtained by cleveland.com in December 2015.

Dawson’s attorney entered the affidavit as evidence in the federal lawsuit on Thursday.

Messages seized from May 23, 2015 showed that Periandri ordered drugs while he working during protests in Cleveland that followed the acquittal of Cleveland police officer Michael Brelo on manslaughter charges in the 2012 killing of an unarmed couple. He also used a shorthand for what the affidavit describes as a racial slur to describe the protesters.

Cleveland police’s internal affairs unit launched an investigation and, that same month, obtained a warrant to collect a hair sample from Periandri and have it tested for drugs.

But before they could execute the warrant, Periandri took a medical leave of absence and checked himself into a drug rehabilitation center in California, internal investigators wrote in the affidavit.

The deal

A May 13, 2016 email between from Cleveland police commander Brian Heffernan to Williams, the head of internal affairs Lt. Monroe Goins and another Cleveland police officer indicated that Periandri was in talks with Assistant Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Jim Gutierrez.

The two agreed that Periandri would be charged by information and plead guilty to a felony drug possession charge at a June 7 court hearing. He would receive treatment in lieu of conviction, the email says.

Periandri would then serve a year’s probation, and the charge would be dropped from his record if he successfully completed treatment. In exchange, Periandri agreed to give up his certification to be a police officer.

But that court hearing never happened.

Prosecutors did not charge Periandri until Thursday, more than eight months after the original offer, according to court records. And the information was not delivered to the clerk’s office until about 1:30 p.m. Monday, after reporters began asking the prosecutor’s office about Periandri’s case.

The information, signed by Gutierrez, Periandri and Periandri’s attorney, Robert Dixon, is stamped Jan. 19. A note stuck on the outside of Periandri’s file says the information was “back-dated” to Jan. 19.

Kathleen Caffrey, a spokeswoman for the prosecutor’s office, said on Monday that Periandri had been charged by information and pleaded guilty in June.

After a reporter asked for a copy of the information and more information about the court hearing on Tuesday, she called to say that she had misinterpreted a conversation with Gutierrez and that no June agreement was reached.

Periandri was allowed to retire from the department for medical reasons on Aug. 9, 2016, Williams said.

Also, when reporters began asking about the drug “conviction” as a result of discovery information from the lawsuit, a spokesman for the prosecutor’s office explained that the records of it had never been entered into the Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court’s public docket due to an “IT issue.” #SeemsLegit

Armed Cleveland Cop Bit Girlfriend; Caused Car Accident to Keep Her from Leaving – Won’t be Fired

In October of 2015, CopBlock Network Contributor  posted about a Cleveland policeman, whose (actual) name is Mister Jackson that was involved in a domestic violence incident. Officer Mister Jackson (I know, it’s awkward) was accused of assaulting a woman and then holding her against her will during the incident.

Since that initial report, more details have emerged. Apparently, this woman was one of two girlfriends that Jackson was involved with while “leading a double life.” Not too surprisingly, the genesis of this domestic dispute was the fact that the woman he assaulted had found out about his other, other half. She then confronted him at that other girlfriend’s home.

At some point, during the ensuing argument, Officer Mister Jackson bit the unnamed woman. And just for good measure he was also holding his gun, while in the process of biting her on the chest. Then, when she tried to flee the house and drive away, he attempted to block the driver side door and prevent her from getting in her car.

She managed to thwart that plan by instead entering from the passenger side. Officer Mister Jackson (it’s fun now) then took things up a notch by jumping in the car himself and pulling on the steering wheel as she was attempting to pull out of the driveway. The fairly predictable result was that the car ended up crashing into a house.

While Cleveland Police Patrolman’s Association President Steve Loomis was quick to assure everyone that the union wasn’t going to be “rushing to judgment about the incident,” one might think that this would be the last chapter in this guy’s police career and he would have to go back to being referred to as Mr. Mister Jackson again.

Of course, you’d have to be pretty naive and really just not paying much attention to actually think that, though. Earlier this week, Officer Mister Jackson pled guilty to a misdemeanor charge of attempted assault in a plea deal offered by the Cuyahoga County prosecutors. As part of the deal, his original charges of abduction, assault, aggravated menacing, and attempted felonious assault were all dropped.

The other part of the deal was that Officer Mister Jackson was not required to surrender his law enforcement certification or even to resign from the Cleveland Police Department. As has been evidenced here at the CopBlock Network over and over and over (etc.) again, it’s not at all unusual for cops to get off with a Policeman’s Discount on the rare occasions they are even charged.

No doubt, if he’s ever even so much as fired (which there is no guarantee of) by the Cleveland PD, once he completes the minor suspension, community service, and/or probation he eventually will receive for what anyone else would be a felon for, he’ll have had plenty of time to update his LinkedIn profile and resume in order to get hired with another department as soon as his wrist stops hurting. It’s pretty much guaranteed that no questions will be asked.

Two Off-Duty Cops Involved in High Speed Chase “Punished” with Suspensions and Community Service

Back in May of last year, two off-duty Ohio cops that were caught driving 77 in a 35 mph zone refused to pull over and led police on a high-speed chase into a residential neighborhood. Eventually, they were stopped after they made a wrong turn and pulled into a private driveway.

It was at that point that the Fairlawn police officers pursuing them recognized them as Officers Justin Herstich and Brandon Foster, also of the Fairlawn Police Department. Instead of being arrested, beaten, and/or murdered for running from the police, they were simply allowed to leave, apparently without even having to get out of their vehicle.

Later, Officer Hertisch, who was driving at the time, was charged with failure to comply with the orders or signal of a police officer, reckless operation of a vehicle, and speeding. Of course, by the time it went to trial those charges had been “amended” to one single charge of obstructing official business. Officer Foster, the passenger, received his Policeman’s Discount right away and was not charged at all.

Last week, they officially received their “punishment.” Via News5Cleveland:

Two Fairlawn police officers, who were off-duty when they led on-duty officers on a high-speed chase, have been suspended without pay, according to law director Bryan Nace.

Officer Justin Herstich was suspended for 45 days, but 15 days were held in abeyance. He began serving the suspension this week.

Officer Brandon Foster was handed a 15-day suspension, but 10 of those days were held in abeyance.

In addition, Herstich cannot be a training officer or an officer in charge for one year. Foster can’t take on either of those roles for a period of nine months.

“There’s an economic aspect here that hits them in the pocketbook, but I also I think it sends a message that you can’t have this type of lack of judgment even when your off duty,” Nace told News 5…

Herstich faced traffic charges for speeding and reckless operation of a motor vehicle. He was also charged with willful fleeing.

The fleeing charge was reduced to obstructing official business, according to Akron Municipal Court. The officer was found guilty on the amended charge and given community service.

So yeah, I have no doubt that Nace is correct that that thirty day suspension and community service that Herstich got, along with the five days without pay Foster had to suffer through, for something anyone else would have been facing felony charges over will serve as a loud and very clear warning to them and everyone in that department that they can’t just get away with this sort of thing. Not to mention the look of disappointment over their “bad lack of judgment” he reportedly gave them the day after their little high-speed adventure.

That’ll show ’em.

Dashcam Video of the Chase

Local News Coverage

Ohio Cop Speeds and Runs Stop Sign to Ticket Driver Because He Flipped Him Off

The following post and accompanying video were shared with the CopBlock Network by Dominic Fallon, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

Within the description included below, Fallon describes how Officer Matt Eden, of the Lyndhurst Police Department in Ohio, responded to being flipped off. In spite of it having been ruled numerous times within every level of the judiciary, including the U.S. Supreme court, a legal action protected by the First Amendment’s right to Freedom of Speech, Officer Eden decided to retaliate against Fallon for it.

In doing so, Fallon maintains that Eden had to make a U-turn, speed, and run several stop signs (without his lights or sirens on) to catch up to him. The video shows the ensuing confrontation, during which another officer and Eden’s supervisor, Sgt. Greg Traci were also called to the scene and Fallon was threatened with arrest if he didn’t provide his ID. Sgt. Traci’s response to Fallon’s contention that Officer Eden had lied about him speeding and request for evidence was that Fallon should just accept the ticket and contest it in court.

Date of Incident: October 10, 2016
Officers Involved: Sergeant Greg Traci – Badge #107, Officer Matt Eden – Badge #014, Officer David Boss – Badge #006
Department Involved: Lyndhurst (Ohio) Police Department
Department Facebook Page: Lyndhurst Police Dept.
Department Phone No.: (440) 473-5116

If you have a video, personal story involving police misconduct and/or abuse, or commentary about a law enforcement related news story, we would be happy to have you submit it. You can find some advice on how to get your submission published on the CopBlock Network within this post.

Click the banner to submit content to CopBlock.org

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I turned onto Winchester from Mayfield and had gone about 50ft on Winchester from  Mayfield when I flipped Officer Eden off while he was heading north into the intersection at a red light.

There were .2 miles in between us when I stopped at the Haverford Dr. intersection and that’s when he was able to turn around at the Sunoco to head back South in my direction.

It is about 430ft from Haverford Dr. to Beacon Ave. where Eden came flying up behind me and then had to slow down drastically to stay at pace with me heading south on Winchester.

It’s .2 miles from Beacon Ave. to Bluebell Dr. and another .2 miles from Bluebell Dr. to where Officer Eden activated his emergency lights to pull me over and where I came to a complete stop, in between 1848 and 1856 Winchester Rd. right in front of the green waist high post.

Within the .2 miles after Bluebell Dr., I was able to come to three complete stops and waited three seconds before I proceeded south on Winchester to go to work. (Stop signs on Winchester are located at Chickadee Ln., Meadow Wood blvd., and Golfway Ln.)

My vehicle is an 08 Honda Civic Si sedan with a 6-speed manual transmission. I stayed at 28mph in 3rd gear, between 2.5-2.7rpms

Officer Eden insists that his department can and will run stop signs with no emergency lights. He also admitted in the video to turning around because I flipped him off, but claims I then sped up to get away from him.

I was also fired because of this event.

Why would someone run from a cop, let alone speed away from one that they had watched turn around and head back into the direction that they were heading?

– Dominic Fallon

Ohio Deputy Arrested Driving Drunk for Third Time Since He Became a Cop After Causing Accident

On Christmas Eve, Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Deputy David Miller was arrested for driving drunk after he caused a multiple car accident. The real kicker to this story is that this is reportedly Deputy Miller’s third DWI offense, all of which occurred during the time he has been heroically serving as a cop. Miller, whose job is actually driving prisoners around town, was also carrying his department issued firearm in his vehicle at the time he was stopped.

BTW, the reason I said “reportedly” his third arrest is because he was also convicted of “failure to control” for “driving on sidewalks/street lawns/curbs.” Call me a skeptic, but I guarantee you that means this is really his fourth drunk driving incident. It’s just that during the last one the Good Cops that stopped him (on someone’s lawn) decided to leave part of that story out. (It would be interesting to know how many times they just let him go altogether.)

Via NewsNet5.com, the Cleveland ABC affiliate:

A Cuyahoga County sheriff’s deputy is facing several charges including operating a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or drugs (OVI) after he caused a two-car accident Saturday night, according to North Olmsted police.

No one was injured.

The deputy, David Miller, a North Olmsted resident, was arraigned in Rocky River municipal court Tuesday and pled not guilty. North Olmsted police said he has three prior OVI arrests. Of those, court records indicate Miller has two prior OVI convictions, one out of Elyria in 2007 and one out of Westlake in 1994. Records also show he was found guilty of failure to control and driving on sidewalks/street lawns/curbs in Westlake in 2013.

A spokeswoman for the Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Department said Miller was hired in 1997. He started as a county corrections officer in 1993. As a deputy, the spokeswoman said he is responsible for transporting prisoners.

North Olmsted police said Miller is also charged with refusing to take a breathalyzer test and passing in a no-passing zone. Saturday’s incident happened on Gessner Road near Lorain Road at about 5:40 pm.

At the time of Miller’s latest arrest, police said he had his county-issued firearm in his personal vehicle. The city prosecutor will determine if there will be any additional charges.

Miller is on unpaid administrative leave pending the outcome of an internal investigation.

Personally, I can’t wait to see how that investigation pans out. Perhaps, four five times will be the charm…

Update: News 5 Cleveland is now stating that Deputy Miller was convicted of yet another DWI prior to being hired. (See the video below for details.)