Tag Archives: Maria

Los Angeles Cop Who Beat Girlfriend and Set Her Hair on Fire to Serve just Six Months in Jail (Update)

As CopBlock Network Contributor described in a post last year, Los Angeles Sheriff’s Deputy Alejandro Flores viciously attacked his now ex-girlfriend. In what has been characterized as the culmination of a pattern of abuse, Flores beat his girlfriend (who only wants to be identified as “Maria” due to fear of further attacks), used a gas stove to set her hair on fire, and then threatened her with his gun to force her to stay at the house after the assault.

All of that and numerous previous assaults took place in front of their two year old son. She was only able to escape by sneaking out of the house and confiding in relatives after he left to go Protect and Serve the County of Los Angeles as part of the LASD. The incredibly serious issue that precipitated Flores’ sadistic actions involved a dispute over a pacifier (presumably intended for the child, not Deputy Flores).

Flores was charged with nine felonies, including three felony counts of domestic battery with corporal injury, two felony counts of assault with a force likely to produce great bodily injury and a felony count each of aggravated assault, criminal threats, dissuading a witness, and false imprisonment. As a result, he faced a maximum of up to 14 years in prison. The prosecutor offered him a plea deal which would have required him to serve five years in prison.

However, the judge had a different idea of how deep a Policeman’s Discount Deputy Flores deserved. He not only gave out just a one year sentence for the savage, almost deadly beating(s) “Maria” had been subjected to in front of her child, he even went so far as to disregard the prosecutors requests to make Flores serve his time in a state prison, where he would be required to do the entire year. Instead, Judge Rodger Robbins sentenced him to county jail, where he’ll be released to look for another woman to abuse and possibly kill in just six months.

The victim in the case for obvious reasons not happy about the judges actions and rightfully states that he is getting off easy because he had one of those Magic Suits that renders people impervious to real consequences for their actions, no matter how illegal, immoral, or violent they might be, at the time of the attack.

Via ABC7.com (in Orange County, CA):

The 34-year-old (Flores) stood emotionless as he listened to his son’s mother speak about the violence.

“He pushed me against the stove yelling, ‘Is this what you want?’ At that point, he turned on the gas burner, setting the my hair on fire,” said the victim, who did not want to be identified.

As she read her victim-impact statement, she urged the judge to issue a stiffer sentence.

“Alejandro chose a career in law enforcement to protect and serve. Apparently, that doesn’t cross to his personal life and the sentence confirms it,” she told the courtroom.

The victim said there had been violence before, all of which occurred in front of their young son…

In her victim impact statement, the victim also urged the judge to consider what message the sentence sends to other victims of domestic violence.

“Knowing what it finally took for me to finally stand up for myself and my son, with a one-year sentence it is almost like I’m being victimized again, now too by the system I trusted to protect me and my son,” she said.

Yet another Hero In Blue held to a higher standard. It’s almost as if Deputy Flores already knew the fix was in when he turned down that five year plea deal offered by the prosecutors.

Videos of Local Coverage

Family of Abel Correa Files Federal Lawsuit Against Las Vegas Police Over 2015 Fatal Shooting

One year ago, in August of 2015, two officers from the LVMPD shot Abel Correa, who was hiding in a closet inside his mother’s house after a neighbor had called police to report that he had been damaging property outside the home. Correa was suffering from mental illness, along with other medical issues, and according to the family Officer Glenn Taylor and Officer Eli Prunchak were aware of that from having interacted with him in the past.

In a body cam video (included in this post) released later, those two officers can be seen opening the door to the small coat closet Correa was hiding in and then shooting him five times. Although he was not armed with any sort of actual weapon, they claimed that he had “lunged at them with a sharp object.”That “sharp object” was subsequently identified as a screwdriver that they say he was holding along with a wrench.

Although the placement of the LVMPD’s body cams (conveniently) allows the hands of the officer wearing it to obscure much of the view of the people they shoot, what can be seen on the video doesn’t quite match up with that story. Also, since wearing a body cam is voluntary for Las Vegas police, only one of the cops was recording video that day.

As stated, Correa’s own hands are not visible in the video. So, it’s not clear what, if anything, he is holding. However, it is quite clear that he is not in any way lunging forward or extending his hands. In fact, he’s both moving slowly and standing straight up at the time he is shot. Regardless of what might have been in his hands when they opened the door, he is not the one acting aggressively at the point when he is shot.

The mother and three brothers of Correa have now filed a $13.2 million federal lawsuit against the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department claiming that Officers Taylor and Prunchak used excessive force and were not properly trained to de-escalate the situation when dealing with mentally ill people, as well as violations of Abel Correa’s civil rights.

Via the Las Vegas Review Journal:

Police arrived at Correa’s mother’s home in the 6900 block of Berkshire Place, near the intersection of Rainbow Boulevard and Tropicana Avenue, between 6 and 10 a.m. that morning after a neighbor reported the man was breaking a window to enter the house.

Officers Glenn Taylor and Eli Prunchak arrived about two hours after the neighbor’s call, searched the home and found Correa, a methamphetamine addict with a documented history of mental illness, in a small closet by the front door. The officers shot Correa five times after they said they opened the closet door and Correa lunged at them with a screwdriver and wrench in his hands.

 Officers believed Correa was holding a knife and was going to stab them because he was in an attack pose, they said at a fact-finding review, which was held in June after the district attorney’s office preliminarily deemed the police shooting justified.

Metro acknowledged days after the shooting that Correa “was in dire need of mental health services.” At the fact-finding review, Correa’s family argued that Taylor knew about the man’s mental illness and didn’t know how to de-escalate the situation.

In a civil complaint filed Thursday, Correa’s mother and three brothers claimed the officers were not trained properly and used excessive deadly force.

Maria, Ricardo, Gilberto and Moises Correa accused the police department and Sheriff Joe Lombardo of violating Abel Correa’s civil rights through policies, procedures and training.

The lawsuit claims Lombardo had “knowledge that Defendants Taylor and Prunchak lacked sufficient knowledge and training in the Departments of Use of Force Policy” and “should have known officers were not aware of the policy regarding passive resistance.”

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According to the lawsuit, Taylor and Prunchak knew Abel Correa suffered from mental health issues, knew he had been placed on mental health hold and knew he had never used violence toward anyone, including police.

“Abel Correa posed no threat of harm to the defendant officers and/or to anyone else at the scene of the shooting, as Abel was hiding in a closet with the door closed and no means of escape,” the lawsuit reads.

One of the officers told Correa to raise his arms and, when he complied, they discharged their weapons at least five times, killing him, the complaint reads.

The lawsuit claims Lombardo, the police department, Prunchak and Taylor are responsible for Correa’s survival action — the injuries and pain Correa suffered immediately before his death, wrongful death and negligent infliction of emotional distress.