Tag Archives: ma

Boston Police Sgt’s Defense: My Penis Probably Wasn’t The First One 16 Year Old Girl Saw

Kenneth Anderson, the lawyer for Boston Police Sergeant Edwin Guzman, stated earlier this week that it was okay if his client sent a sixteen year old girl pictures of his penis because: “You can’t tell me someone her age has never seen a picture of a penis on the Internet.” It’s an interesting albeit not very convincing defense to say the least for Sgt. Guzman, who’s facing charges of “annoying and accosting a person of the opposite sex” and “disseminating harmful material to a minor,” but apparently is in talks with prosecutors to resolve the case. It’s not clear what exactly that means, but as you can see below, it probably means Guzman’s gonna have to ice down a sore wrist at some point in the near future.

Via : (Watch the report here)

Sgt. Edwin Guzman is accused of sending sexually explicit Facebook messages to a minor.

Guzman was promoted to sergeant in August 2014, around the same time he allegedly sent the messages to the teenager who says she considered Guzman a family friend and father figure.

“It started off we regularly chat and it’s mostly about school and how life is,” the teenager who was 16 at the time told 5 Investigates’ Mike Beaudet.

But she says the conversations kept escalating from there.

“If I gave him like pleasure and let him do things to me, he’d be willing to buy me things,” she said. “He took a picture of his penis and he sent it to me.”

Guzman was charged in Quincy District Court with sending obscene matter to a minor and accosting and annoying a person of the opposite sex.

The Norfolk District Attorney’s office has confirmed the charges were based on the allegedly explicit messages and picture.

But nearly two years later we’ve learned the more serious charge of sending obscene matter to a minor is expected to be dropped, a charge that carried a potential prison sentence of up to five years.

While officials say they believe the alleged victim’s story and they have the deleted Facebook messages, they’ve been unable to recover the naked photo.

The alleged victim’s mother is upset the case has dragged on for so long, culminating in this setback.

“I think the system’s screwed up,” she said. “I still feel like he came out winning.”

The alleged victim’s mother says the district attorney’s office has told her Guzman had indicated he would plead guilty to the lesser charge, if he avoids jail time so the family is willing to go along, rather than risk a jury finding him not guilty.

“I’d rather have him plead guilty on his own and say he’s guilty of one thing,” said the mother of the alleged victim.

“Do you think this is justice?” asked 5 Investigates’ Beaudet.

“Not at all. It’s a slap on the wrist,” she replied.

Guzman is due in court Friday morning. His lawyer wouldn’t comment on whether a plea deal could be reached by then.

Boston police tell us their internal investigators are monitoring the case and will begin an investigation which will ultimately decide if he gets to keep his job, once the criminal case is resolved.

For now, Guzman remains on paid administrative leave.

That paid vacation Sgt. Guzman has been on has lasted for just under a year and a half. That’s a nice bonus for the former Boston Police Department officer of the year (2012).

Springfield Police “Blindsided” by Retired Officer’s Theft of $385,000 From Evidence Room

Officer Kevin Burnham, who retired as the “senior officer” in the Springfield (Massachusetts) Police Department after 43 years, was exposed as a long time thief during an audit after a new commissioner was hired. Dating back to at least 2009 (it’s not clear from the article if that’s when Burnham’s hands first got sticky or if that’s just as far as they went back), the thefts total over $385,000. For 20 years prior to his retirement, Burnham had been acting as the narcotics evidence officer.

So whenever other cops found an excuse to steal money from people, via drug forfeiture, Senior Officer Burnham would take a little off the top for himself. This reportedly included “piddling amounts” of less than $100, as well as one instance in which he helped himself to almost $108,000.

It only took them six years to catch up to him and that was basically an accident rather than them noticing a shit load of cash walking out the door and bills falling out of Burnham’s pocket anytime he bent over. (The rumor I made up that Burnham’s nickname around the station was “the Rainmaker” hasn’t been confirmed.) The audit “was part of an overall plan to modernize the department, as opposed to a response to any internal rumblings about Burnham.”

Apparently though, Senior Officer Burnham was just a master thief or magician:

Police Commissioner John Barbieri said no other police officers have been implicated in the investigation. It remains a question how one officer could allegedly lift nearly $400,000 in cash under the noses of his supervisors, however.

Another $170,000 went out the window  in order to hire a private firm for the audit. It would have been crazy to have someone keep an eye on the guy accepting all the cash that the department was stealing from other people or maybe count it every once in a while to see if it was still there.

Indictment against Kevin Burnham

Abington Mass. Police Chief Proposed “Friendly” Kidnapping Competition

In the spirit of the holidays, Chief David Majenski of the Abington Police Department, in Massachusetts, sent out an email to “motivate” his officers proposing a “friendly competition” to see who could kidnap the most people within the month of October. The winner was to receive a weekend off in November as a bounty.

Somehow encouraging cops within their city to find any excuse they could to pad their arrest numbers didn’t sit well with the citizens of Abington. Although the competition is supposed to be voluntary according to Chief Majenski, it raised obvious questions about the effect it might have on the perceived objectivity of police officers and the fact that it created a de facto quota system.

Via MyFoxBoston.com:

“They are supposed to be neutral and independent when they are investigating potential criminal wrongdoing,” Krowski said.

The “friendly competition” could also impact something else; the criminal cases that resulted from those arrests.

“It shows a motive, motive and bias against the defendant. A lack of neutrality,” [defense attorney Joseph] Krowski said.

The rumors (that I just started) of another contest Chief Majenski was considering to see which officer could beat up the most minorities in the month of December have yet to be confirmed (it’s probably “voluntary,” also).

Boston News, Weather, Sports | FOX 25 | MyFoxBoston

Boston Cop Claims It’s Illegal to Film Him Without Informing Him First

This video from the PoliceRecording.com YouTube channel (it’s actually more of an audio recording) shows a traffic stop in Boston. The unidentified officer heard on the video notices the passenger is recording with his cell phone. He then very incorrectly states that it is illegal to do so without informing him that he is being filmed. This traffic stop obviously took place in public view. As everyone who regularly reads this site is well aware, it is therefore perfectly legal (and very much recommended) to film this police officer during the course of his duties.

The original description included with the video:

Location: Washington St. Boston, MA
Date: September 18th, 2015, at approx. 1:15 am.

Sadly, I didn’t get the officer’s name or badge number.
Let’s just call him Officer Twat.

Rough officer description:
Black male, mid 30s to mid 40s, smelled like bacon. Drove an SUV-type vehicle.

Officer was accompanied by a white male/partner who behaved reasonably well (he never opened his mouth and gave me a good impression, overall). I commend him for it.

General video description:
My brother gets pulled over for speeding. This is NOT in the video recording, but he initially asks the cop, “May I ask why I’m being stopped?” At this point, the officer gives a rude and condescending answer, “If you would just let me do my job. Just let me do my job.” (You REALLY had to be there to catch the ugly tone.)

Sarcasm: Sorry for asking a basic and perfectly legitimate question, officer [facepalm].

The cop then walks back to his car with my brother’s license and registration. Three minutes later, he comes back and soon realizes I was (gasp!) recording the incident.

The Boston police officer gets offended because of being video-recorded. He insists I have to let him know beforehand.

In other words, the poor guy thinks I have to get his approval. Sorry, but I’m not your wife.

Other useful information, for the hell of it:

Quote from the Boston.com article, How a Boston Case Won You the Right to Record Police: “Massachusetts is a ‘two party consent’ state, which means it’s illegal to record audio without the knowledge and permission of the person you are recording — unless, as we’ll see, that person is a government official in a public space.”

For the record:

Boston drivers: Beware of Officer Twat. He clearly seems mentally unstable and gets agitated easily.

Recording Police CopBlock

Everyone else: Always video-record the police, no matter how mundane the situation may be. You never know when they might go batshit crazy and violate your rights.

Get a video streaming app such as Bambuser.


  • Q: You never recorded the cop’s face!
    A: I wanted to protect the driver’s identity. As a result, the focus remained on the dashboard.
  • Q: That sounds awfully hypocritical. What about respecting the officer’s wishes?
    A: In the end, citizens have the right to videotape (or avoid) whomever we choose. I was merely exercising those rights. Deal with it.
  • Q: Why is the driver so apologetic?
    A: Who knows. Maybe he wanted to defuse the situation (the wrong way, mind you). He even apologized for asking why he was being stopped earlier (which he shouldn’t have).
  • Q: I’m a cop. How can I reduce the chances of ever landing on YouTube?
    A: Let’s put it this way: The more you complain about being videotaped, the more you’re going to end up all over the internet. If you simply ignore the camera, then there’s nothing special about the encounter — thus the video wouldn’t go online.

NEVER, EVER complain about being videotaped; you’re only shooting yourselves in the foot.

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When Police Go Rogue on Facebook by Ken Armstrong of the Marshall Project

This post was shared with the CopBlock Network by a reader, via the CopBlock.org Submission Page. It was originally published by Ken Armstrong at themarshallproject.org.

Last week, Seattle police apologized for an incident in which a female officer arrested a 69-year-old man walking in the city with a golf club. She said he wielded the club as a weapon. He said it was simply a cane. Police video supported the man’s account.

But it was only after another discovery – made by a Seattle newspaper, The Stranger – that the police department removed the officer from street duty, assigning her to a desk.

The officer is white. The man she arrested with the golf club is black. Last year, the officer posted this on Facebook: “If you believe that blacks are NOT accusing white America for their problems then you are missing the point of the riots in Ferguson and the chronic black racism that far exceeds any white racism in this country. I am tired of black peoples paranoia that white people are out to get them. … I am tired of black people saying poor poor me …”

When Seattle’s police chief read those Facebook comments last week, she said she was “shocked and disappointed.”

Around the country, other chiefs can relate. So can other communities where officers – and sometimes, the police chiefs themselves – have posted Facebook messages that created controversy and sometimes led to suspensions or firings. Such episodes have played out on other social-media sites, of course. And, like the Internet itself, they extend beyond the United States. (In the United Kingdom, more than 150 officers have faced disciplinary action for bad Facebook behavior, including one constable who wrote: “Let’s not be so soft on these [worst expletive imaginable] out there.”)

But looking just at Facebook – and just at police in the United States – here’s a roundup of cases where officers have been accused of crossing a line when going online.

Marlin, Texas: A police sergeant was fired in August 2014 after posting this on Facebook: “The first day of the month! The day I absolutely LOVE going to the grocery store after putting in 120+ hours last month. I love being able to see how the useless lazy turd bags spend the hard earned money my working friends and I provided for them so they can sit of their lazy asses all month and drink the beer I am paying for. I especially love it in the summer so I can admire the thousands of dollars of ink they have adorning their unclean bodies as they smile at me with that mouth full of bling. Makes me want to help them take their groceries and help them load them into that Escalade with $4000 rims. I promise, if I ever snap and go on a killing spree, it will be in a supermarket on the first.” (Elsewhere in Texas, police have created Facebook dustups in Dallas, Emory, and Matagorda County.)

Jonesboro, Ark.: The same month that police sergeant was fired in Texas, the police chief in Jonesboro, Ark., resigned. The chief, on Facebook, called a newspaper reporter a “pro-dope smoking, law license revoked, left wing liberal.” He also called her “smelly,” and wrote: “Dealing with ole Sunshine is like trying to pick up a dog turd by the ‘clean end.’” Jonesboro’s mayor handed the chief a 30-day suspension, but the chief quit before serving it. (And he wasn’t the only police chief to resign last August over a Facebook post. The chief in Chickasha, Okla., did, too. Before that, so did the police chief in Williamston, S.C.)

Bainbridge Island, Wash.: On this island in the Puget Sound, police in 2010 shot and killed a mentally ill man, in a case that prompted a civil rights lawsuit and a $1 million verdict against the city. A week after the shooting, the officer who opened fire received a Facebook message from a Los Angeles cop, who flippantly referred to the shooting as “combat qual.” The Bainbridge officer responded, on Facebook, with: “no sweat here … bad guy should have listened a little better.” (A year later, a different Bainbridge officer was reprimanded for going on Facebook and writing of a crackdown on traffic offenses: “We rained terror on the island and no one was taken alive.”)

Portsmouth, Va.: In 2011, a police officer shot and killed an intoxicated, unarmed cook, a citizen of Kazakhstan who was struck 11 times. Afterward, the officer’s Facebook page – captured by The Virginian-Pilot before disappearing from the web – became the subject of an internal review. Among other postings, he described a photo of a box of handguns as his “box of VENGEANCE!” and wrote: “would be better if i was dirtying them instead of cleaning them!”

Boston, Mass.: Last year, a police officer for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority posted on Facebook: “Farther’s (sic) Day, the most confusing day in Roxbury.” The president of the Boston NAACP told television station WCVB, “It’s a sad commentary on what this gentleman thinks is going on in communities of color.” Afterward, the officer was stripped of his role as a police-academy drill instructor.

Indianapolis, Ind.: Television station WTHR aired an investigative report in 2009 about an Indiana state trooper’s Facebook posts. “I pick up trash for a living,” the trooper wrote. He boasted of drinking heavily and posted a photo in which a fellow police officer pointed a .357 Magnum at the trooper’s head. By matching Facebook’s timestamps with state patrol employment records, the station discovered that the trooper sometimes posted while on duty. The trooper subsequently resigned.

Albuquerque, N.M.: That trooper certainly wasn’t the only police officer to refer to people as garbage. In 2011, an Albuquerque police officer shot a man in the back after a traffic stop, killing him. Soon after, local media reported that the officer listed his job on Facebook as “human waste disposal.” No charges were filed against the officer for the shooting, but he did get a four-day suspension for his Facebook post.

New York City: In 2009, a New York City police officer described his Facebook status as “watching ‘Training Day’ to brush up on proper police procedure.” A few weeks later, that post was used to attack the officer’s credibility when a defendant he had arrested went to trial. (In “Training Day,” there is little, if anything, proper about the corrupt narcotics detective played by Denzel Washington.) Two years later, more than a dozen NYPD officers posted offensive comments about the West Indian Day Parade, leading to eventual discipline.

Monroe, La.: Responding to the protests in Ferguson, Mo., following the grand jury’s decision not to indict officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown, a police officer in Monroe, La., went on Facebook and wrote: “Ive got an idea on how to clear the streets in Ferguson Missouri. Lets have a crop duster fly over and drop job applications.” The officer, who was subsequently placed on leave, also wrote: “I’m surprised the beauty salon didn’t have armed guards. That ‘good hair’ is expensive. Thats ghetto gold.” Police elsewhere also made Facebook posts about Ferguson that stirred controversy. That happened, among other places, in Elgin, Ill.;Glendale, Mo.; Portland, Ore.; Kansas City; and Seattle.

Volusia, Fla.: Before Michael Brown’s death, there was the controversy surrounding Trayvon Martin’s. In 2013, on the day George Zimmerman was acquitted in Martin’s death, a Volusia County Beach Safety officer posted on Facebook: “Another thug gone. Pull up your pants and be respectful. Bye bye thug r.i.p.” The following month, the officer was fired.

Five Solutions To Reign In The Police State

The post below was shared with the CopBlock Network by “Jeremy,” via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. It discusses abuses by the government and some solutions that could be implemented right now to halt what is rapidly becoming a police state within the United States.


The problem with police brutality and overreaction is appalling and ever growing.

What if I told you that there was a place where martial law was declared, a whole city was shut down, and the police detained anyone on the street and broke into countless peoples houses on the premise of protecting them? Thinking it must be China or Russia or Nazi Germany? No this tale happened here. In Boston after the marathon bombing.

Our rights as Americans are slowly being taken away under the guise of public safety. Did shutting down the city save anyone? No, but it set an extremely dangerous precedent of police trampling on the rights of the American people.

These brutal incidents are exactly the reason why the United States of America were formed in the first place. The Revolutionary War was  a case of the American people standing up and saying we will no longer tolerate oppression from those appointed to protect us. It starts at the bottom with the individual police force and will rapidly grow from there.

How do we make a difference? Here are five things that we can do to cause change.

  1. Require that all officers of the law wear body cameras at all times that they are performing their duties. This alone in forces that have adopted them has had an enormous impact in the number of incidents of police brutality. And as they are public servants, the public has a right to know what they are doing.
  2. Immediately stop all transfers of military equipment to police forces and confiscate or destroy all equipment previously transferred. Why? Because they are the police, not the military. The job of the military is to protect us from foreign threats and they are equipped to do so. The job of the police is to enforce the law, not protect the nation from an invading army. Why exactly do they need tanks and machine guns to enforce the law?
  3. Immediately enact strict physical fitness standards. Did you know that over 80% of cops are overweight? Did you ever think that if the officer involved in the Ferguson shooting was not overweight he may have been capable of arresting the young man without resorting to killing him? Too many police have only the option of deadly force to use against a suspect because they are incapable of holding their own due to their obesity.
  4. In any incident where police brutality is suspected, make it a requirement that an independent authority review the incident and recommend charges. A company who defrauds consumers doesn’t get to investigate itself to find if it did anything wrong, so why do the police get to?
  5. Prosecute and treat police as any other suspect would be treated. My mind goes back to a particular incident where a officer shot a man laying on the ground handcuffed in cold blood, was videotaped doing it, and only received a year in jail. If you or I did that we would either be jailed for life or given the death penalty for murder.

This is just the beginning. Will this fix everything? No, but it will serve to stop the march of the United States towards a police state.

If we do not act now, we will wake up one day to find that we have no rights left, and the only way to right the ship at that point will be armed revolution.

Massachusetts Police Officer Tailgates Driver, Then Tickets Her For Speeding

The following post was shared with the CopBlock Network by Tammy Shah, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

Date of Incident: May 30, 2014
Officers Involved: Officer Artie O’Connell – Badge # M24
Department Involved: Massachusetts Environmental Police
Department Contacts: Major Len Roberts – [email protected] – Captain Roger Thurlow – [email protected] – Lt. Colonel Chris Baker – [email protected] – Lt. Colonel Chris Baker 617-616-1650

On Friday May 30, 2014, at approximately 17:30, I was traveling westbound on the mass pike in the right lane with traffic flow. The traffic was slowing in the right lane due to a large vehicle at the front of the line of cars and trucks when myself and another vehicle ahead of me changed lanes to the left lane to pass. The vehicle in front of me sped away quickly. I increased my speed to about 70 to overtake the vehicles in the line of traffic. While traveling in the passing lane, a vehicle came up quickly to the rear of my car. I could see the headlights in my rearview and little else. The vehicle was traveling so closely to the back of my car that I could not see the license plate, all I could see were the headlights and a sturdy ‘cage’ type device on the front of the SUV. The vehicle was a large SUV type vehicle. I increased my speed to try to get past the line of vehicles quickly, but the SUV also increased speed accordingly and stayed dangerously close to the rear of my Prius. Traveling with my two dogs and my son in the car with me, I became nervous and was only concentrating on getting past the line of traffic and moving to the right so the SUV would no longer be tailgating me.

Once I cleared the end of the line of traffic, I swiftly moved to the right lane; the SUV immediately began to gain momentum to pass me and as I saw them come into my peripheral line of view on my left, I threw my hand up to display my frustration for their unsafe driving. Just as the vehicle came to the side of my car, and saw my hand up, they immediately slowed, flipped on blue lights, merged behind me and pulled me over. My son was in tears, my heart was racing, and I pulled to the side of the highway ASAP. The officer came to the side of my car and started barking orders. “License and registration!” I got my license out and handed it to him and was retrieving my registration when he demanded, “Do you know the speed limit on the Mass Pike?” I said it was 65. He said, “Yes, 65, NOT 80 like you were doing. Immediately I said that I was traveling so fast because he was too close behind me and I was scared; he cut me off before I could continue to speak, demanding my registration. The officer was intimidating and rude. He was intentionally trying to make me feel lesser with both his verbal behavior and his body language. I was clearly not a threat and I was not argumentative.

The officer returned to his SUV, still close behind my vehicle, and I could not identify what agency he was with. He left us sitting in the car for about twenty minutes. He finally returned and in an argumentative voice asked me if I knew what the left lane was for. I said, “Yes, for passing and…” He again cut me off and shouted, “YES, passing AND emergency vehicles! You are meant to enter the lane, pass the vehicle, exit the lane… enter the lane, pass the vehicle, exit the lane.” He was condescending and rude, treating me as if I was a child, and clearly trying to assert his dominance in the situation. I said I understood that, but that the line of traffic was tight and that he was too close to me, scaring me, and he again cut me off telling me that I had plenty of safe chances to make a lane change.

Well, I disagree! How can I safely lane change when someone is driving so close to my tiny vehicle with their huge SUV and any attempt I made to accelerate to give myself some breathing room was met with similar acceleration? The officer said he clocked me doing 80 and that doesn’t shock me, honestly. Anybody would speed to get away from what they feel is a potential danger – an unsafe driver! What if I had to stop quickly? He would have rammed the back of my car so hard everybody would have perished! His enormous SUV would have all but flattened my tiny Prius. Also, it amazes me that he was fully intent on passing me until I threw my hand in the air in disgust of his poor driving safety! Honestly, as far as I was concerned, he was still just some Joe on the highway being unsafe. I had no idea he was with law enforcement until he put the blue lights on. He didn’t like that I did that, so he pulled me over and he asserted his dominance over me the only way he could: to intimidate me, talk over me, and present me with a ticket. When he finished that and we pulled back on the highway, he immediately entered the left lane, accelerated quickly and ran up on the back end of another unsuspecting driver.

This officer is unsafe! His driving practices are unsafe and his actions reflect a poor attitude and a disrespect of other drivers; both on the road and face to face. He knew he was wrong, and he attempted to punish me as one would punish a child who acts out over an adults wrong doing.

Within approximately an hour after receiving my citation, I was at my mother’s house in Westfield, MA and I was placing calls to find out who his superior officer was and to lodge a complaint. It took me approximately four phone calls and around forty-five minutes (and the assistance of a very helpful State Police officer) before I got on the phone with the officer’s supervisor, Major Roberts. Major Roberts has assured me that he would investigate this situation and would be contacting me again on Monday June 2.

Since the issue, I spoke with Major Roberts on June 2nd, and Captain Roger Thurlow on June 3rd. Captain Thurlow had reviewed my driving record (which is clean) and talked with Officer O’Connell about the stop. The officer admitted to Captain Thurlow that he was ‘in a hurry to get to a location in need of a K-9 unit.’ However, Captain Thurlow told me it was not an emergency; a roundabout admission of guilt regarding speeding. Officer O’Connell also told the Captain that I had given him ‘the finger’. Captain Thurlow was careful to let me know that the officers are allowed a certain amount of ‘personal discretion’ when deciding to stop somebody or let them go. I told him that I wanted the ticket forgiven since Officer O’Connell’s hazardous driving was the catalyst for the whole situation.

To date, I have attempted to contact Captain Thurlow an additional two times. Only once did he answer me back, telling me my complaint concerning Officer O’Connell was ‘currently in the investigatory process. Please be assured that you will be contacted as soon as all pertinent reports are submitted and reviewed.” He has disengaged with me since June 6th, and ignored my second email, as did Major Len Roberts who was CC’d on the email. Finally on June 26th, I reached out to the acting Director Lt. Colonel Chris Baker with an email directly to him; but alas no response from him either. On July 17th, I phoned and left a voicemail with his admin/assistant.

My court date for the ticket issued is August 5, 2014 in Palmer, MA. Shame on them!

– Tammy Shah