Tag Archives: loitering

First Amendment Audit: Imperial County Sheriff’s Sgt John Toledano Unlawfully Detains Videographers Filming in Public

California Guardian High Desert Community Watch First Amendment Audit Illegal Detention

Imperial County Sheriff’s Sgt. John Toledano handcuffed and illegally detained “California Guardian” and “High Desert Community Watch” during a First Amendment Audit by order of the FBI for legally filming in public.

Note: The video and description included within this post were shared with Nevada Cop Block via an anonymous reader submission. If you have videos, stories, upcoming events/protests, or personal interactions with the police (and/or “justice” system) that you would like to share, send them to us and we will do everything we can to bring it to the attention of the world. In addition, you can visit the Nevada Cop Block resources section for information and links to the rights of citizens when dealing with police, during which you should always be filming.

As is mentioned in the description, this video shows what is known as a “First Amendment Audit.” That consists of going out and filming government buildings and other public property. Oftentimes, the police, security guards, government employees, and even members of the public don’t understand that the First Amendment protects a citizen’s right to take photos and/or record video of anything that is within view of a public place.

Obviously, this video is very much an example of that (commonly referred to as an “audit fail” among those who do them). After initially confronting them and asking for ID, Sgt. Toledano (along with two other unidentified officers) handcuffed the two men who go by the pseudonyms “California Guardian” and “High Desert Community Watch” publicly.

Both of them were then forced to sit in the back of a police vehicle and threatened with trespassing citations, although they never at any time entered private property. According to what Sgt. Toledago states on the video, this illegal detention was at ordered by the FBI. Eventually, they were both released without any charges.

As already stated, you obviously can legally film in public. Also, you are not required to identify yourself unless a police officer has reasonable suspicion to believe you have committed, are in the process of committing, or are about to commit a crime (the requirement to be legally detained). And legally they can’t seize your camera (or any other personal property) unless they have actually arrested you or obtained a warrant or subpoena for specific content on it.

One of the main reasons for doing First Amendment Audits is to test whether the police or security officers understand the law regarding filming in public spaces. Also, part of that reasoning is making them understand that it is legal and thereby deter them from harassing people filming in the future.

Date of Incident: April 11, 2017
Officer Involved: Sgt. John Toledano
Department Involved: Imperial County (CA) Sheriff’s Office
Facebook Page:
Imperial County Sheriff’s Office
Twitter Account:

Instagram Account:
Imperial County Sheriff
Department Phone No.:
(442) 265-2005
Department Email: Sheriff Raymond Loera

Adam (California Guardian) and Phillip (High Desert Community Watch) were down in Imperial County video recording when a Deputy Sheriff, Sgt Toledano, stopped them and unlawfully detained them on behalf of the FBI for the sole intent of identifying them with no suspicion that they had violated any crime.

Adam and Phillip were cuffed, placed in the back of a patrol vehicle and driven down around the corner to await the arrival of the FBI. Adam and Phillip never provided identification and were released after being given detention slips in the name of John Doe.

Both detention slips used Calif. Penal Code 647 (h) – “prowling” – as an excuse. Adam and Philip never entered any private property and remained on the public right of way (sidewalk) during their recording.

The men in the video frequently post First Amendment Audits and other videos to their Youtube channels: “California Guardian” and “High Desert Community Watch.” You can support them by making donations via GoFundMe: California Guardian and High Desert Community Watch News Network. Although they sometimes travel to other areas, as the psuedonyms they use indicate, these two auditors live in Southern California.

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Arkansas Police Captain Caught Publicly Masturbating, Propositioned Undercover Cops; Only Charged With Loitering

Arkansas State Police Captain Steven Bryan Davis was ready to get a little freaky about a week or so ago (August 30th). So he parked out by a trail next to a wooded area, stripped down, and started getting himself revved up. Apparently, he was “up for anything” that day, too.

When two undercover cops stumbled upon his little solo party, he invited them to get in on the act and do a dirty little show for him in the back of his truck. They kinda ruined the mood though by slapping him into handcuffs. (Or maybe not; he sounds like the kind of guy that might like a little bondage.)

Via 4029TV.com:

Davis faces a Class C Misdemeanor charge of loitering. A Class C Misdemeanor carries the punishment of up to 30 days in jail and/or a fine of up to $500, according to (Prosecuting Attorney Daniel) Shue.

Arkansas State Police Captain Steven Bryan Davis of Troop H in Fort Smith was arrested Tuesday afternoon.

The arrest location was listed as 2500 Riverfront Drive, which is where Highway 255 crosses a trail in a wooded area near the Arkansas River.

In the report released Thursday, an undercover officer reports Capt. Davis appeared to be masturbating in his truck near Fort Smith Park.

When the officer and another undercover officer confronted him, they say Davis said he wanted to watch the two undercover officers perform sex acts in the back of his truck, according to the report.

The undercover officers then identified themselves and handcuffed Capt. Davis, the report says.

Davis was booked on a misdemeanor loitering charge, Fort Smith Police told 40/29 News.

Davis was released on a $200 bond.

Captain Davis was placed on paid administrative leave, according to an Arkansas State Police spokesperson.

Although, he was originally given a paid vacation after posting bail, he has actually resigned since then. It is interesting that he was only charged with a misdemeanor count of loitering. I’m sure that if any ordinary citizen had been caught “giving themselves a tune up” in public and then asked the cops that caught them to do some creepy stuff in their car, they wouldn’t get charged with some sort of sex crime.

Looks like Captain Davis has already received his Policeman’s Discount and is well on his way to starting his second career at some other police department.

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Update: Woman Beaten by LVMPD Officer For Littering Has Filed Civil Rights Lawsuit

In January, I posted about former LVMPD Officer Richard Scavone, who was caught on camera assaulting a woman. The immediate reason for his violent actions that day was that she had thrown a cup of coffee on the ground while he was in the process of profiling and harassing her. In reality, it was a case of “contempt of cop” in which the woman didn’t properly bow and scrape to his authoritah and possibly a bit of showing off to the corrections officer he was giving a ride along to at the time.

Now the woman he attacked and then arrested on trumped up charges to justify that arrest has filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against him. In that lawsuit, Amanda Vizcarrondo-Ortiz names the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, Officer Scavone, and former Corrections Officer Travis Buechler who was with Scavone at the time of the incident. Cal Potter, a Las Vegas civil rights lawyer, is representing Vizcarrondo-Ortiz in the lawsuit.

Via the Associated Press:

A California woman who authorities say was illegally beaten by a police officer wearing a body camera has filed a federal civil rights lawsuit seeking damages from Las Vegas police, the former patrol officer and his partner at the time.

Officials have called the case one of the first to use body-camera video against an officer wearing the device.

Amanda Vizcarrondo-Ortiz of Los Angeles said in her lawsuit filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Las Vegas that she suffered permanent face, neck and back injuries during her January 2015 arrest on littering and loitering for prostitution charges. The charges were later dropped.

Ortiz’s lawyer, Cal Potter, called her beating and arrest unjustified “street justice” for offending the arresting officer, Richard Thomas Scavone, by throwing a cup of coffee on the ground and refusing to put her hands behind her back to be handcuffed.
“He videotaped his own misconduct,” Potter said of Scavone. “It’s our belief that there was no basis for the stop or the arrest…”
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A Young Man’s Life is Ruined by a Pennsylvania Policeman’s Wrongful Actions

The following post was sent in by Fran Perrone, via the CopBlock.org submissions page. Within it she details the harassment and false arrest of her son by police in Delaware County, PA. and the effect that has had on both him and their family.

Fran states:

I don’t know what to do. I am scared that this fateful night will ruin my son for life. These cops are heartless, and mean, and well known to lock people up and make up charges. I want the world to know what happened to my son as he was peaceably walking down the street.

December 30, 2015

My son would have been out of jail for two years today, but a nightmare happened to him that has our family shattered for the New Year. My 24 year old son is on parole for drug charges and has been a model citizen since his release. He landed a job, found a girlfriend, and even got an apartment with her. He just works, pay bills, watches TV, and sleeps because parole allows little else.

However, on the night of December 30th he met his girlfriend to walk her home and had two friends with him. After they met up, they started walking home in Folcroft, PA (Delaware County). Suddenly, a police car pulled up and told the four of them to put their hands on the car saying that they were prowling and loitering, which was not true.

My son was outraged and began asking questions. The cop told him to shut up and face forward. Moments later, he asked why he was being arrested and he was handcuffed and slammed FACE FIRST TO THE GROUND and TAZED twice on his leg. The cops then arrested these four innocent people. They were treated like dogs for seven hours in a cell – no phone calls, no food, no nothing. In the morning, they all went to see a judge.

The other three were released with no charges, but my son was sent to JAIL with these charges:

  • Loitering
  • Public Drunkenness
  • Resisting Arrest
  • Aggravated Assault

I am going crazy. Yes, he made some bonehead moves years back but he has put that behind him and he was never a violent offender.

– Fran Perrone

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“Let Me See Your I.D.” Stop and Identify Statutes – Know Your Rights

Stop and ID Statutes Map States Nevada Cop Block

Everyone should know their rights regardless, but it’s even more essential that you do if you intend to go out and film the police. Therefore, you should know if the state you live in has passed “stop and identify” statutes. If that is the case, then you should also know what is and isn’t required under such laws.

In 24 states police may require you to identify yourself. (If they have reasonable suspicion that you’re involved in criminal activity.)

“Stop and identify” statutes are laws in the United States that allow police to detain persons and request such persons to identify themselves, and arrest them if they do not.

Except when driving, the requirement to identify oneself does not require a person who has been detained to provide physical identification. Verbally giving identifying information is sufficient to satisfy that requirement.

In the United States, interactions between police and citizens fall into three general categories: consensual (“contact” or “conversation”), detention (often called a Terry stop), or arrest. “Stop and identify” laws pertain to detentions.

Consensual

At any time, police may approach a person and ask questions. However, the person approached is not required to identify himself or answer any other questions, and may leave at any time.

Police are not usually required to tell a person that he is free to decline to answer questions and go about his business. A person can usually determine whether or not the interaction is consensual by asking, “Am I free to go?”

Detention

Police may briefly detain a person if they have reasonable suspicion that the person has committed, is committing, or is about to commit a crime. Embedded below are videos from Flex Your Rights describing what reasonable suspicion is and when you are required to provide ID to the police. Police may question a person detained in a Terry stop, but in general, the detainee is not required to answer.[10] However, many states have “stop and identify” laws that explicitly require a person detained under the conditions of Terry to identify himself to police, and in some cases, provide additional information. (As of February 2011, the Supreme Court has not addressed the validity of requirements that a detainee provide information other than his name.)

Arrest

A detention requires only that police have reasonable suspicion that a person is involved in criminal activity. However, to make an arrest, an officer must have probable cause to believe that the person has committed a crime. Some states require police to inform the person of the intent to make the arrest and the cause for the arrest. But it is not always obvious when a detention becomes an arrest. After making an arrest, police may search a person, his or her belongings.

Variations in “stop and identify” laws

  • Five states’ laws (Arizona, Indiana, Louisiana, Nevada, and Ohio) explicitly impose an obligation to provide identifying information.
  • Fourteen states grant police authority to ask questions, with varying wording, but do not explicitly impose an obligation to respond:
  • In Montana, police “may request” identifying information;
  • In 12 states (Alabama, Delaware, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Utah, Wisconsin), police “may demand” identifying information;
  • In Colorado, police “may require” identifying information of a person.
  • Identifying information varies, but typically includes
  • Name, address, and an explanation of the person’s actions;
  • In some cases it also includes the person’s intended destination, the person’s date of birth (Indiana and Ohio), or written identification if available (Colorado).
  • Arizona’s law, apparently written specifically to codify the holding in Hiibel, requires a person’s “true full name”.
  • Nevada’s law, which requires a person to “identify himself or herself”, apparently requires only that the person state his or her name.
  • In five states (Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island), failure to identify oneself is one factor to be considered in a decision to arrest. In all but Rhode Island, the consideration arises in the context of loitering or prowling.
  • Seven states (Arizona, Florida, Indiana, Louisiana, New Mexico, Ohio, and Vermont) explicitly impose a criminal penalty for noncompliance with the obligation to identify oneself.
  • Virginia makes it a non-jailable misdemeanor to refuse to identify oneself to a conservator of the peace when one is at the scene of a breach of the peace witnessed by that conservator.

What is Reasonable Suspicion?

When Are You Required to Provide ID to the Police?

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