Tag Archives: jail

Oregon Cop Throws Handcuffed Man Head First Into Concrete Wall on Video; Receives Probation

Oregon Police Officer Brian David Scott Assault Handcuffed Inmate

Jail surveillance video: Milton-Freewater, OR Police Officer Brian David Scott shoves a handcuffed man into a concrete wall causing severe head and back injuries. Later, he was sentenced to probation and a small fine.

Recently released video shows Milton-Freewater, Oregon Police Officer Brian David Scott shove a handcuffed man into a concrete wall in September 2016. That man, Jeffery Allen Fields, suffered multiple severe injuries to his head and several vertebrae in the assault. It’s quite clear on the video that Fields has no way of stopping himself from slamming into the wall with his hands cuffed behind him.

Note: If you have videos, stories, upcoming events/protests, or personal interactions with the police (and/or “justice” system) that you would like to share, send them to us and we will do everything we can to bring it to the attention of the world. In addition, you can visit the Nevada Cop Block resources section for information and links to the rights of citizens when dealing with police, during which you should always be filming.

It appears that the motivation for that attack by Officer Scott is that Fields was being verbally argumentative. However, at no time whatsoever on the video, even afterwards, did he act in any way physically resistant or combative toward either of the officers present. Obviously, there is no justification for Scott’s deliberate attempt to inflict harm on a man who was unable to defend himself.

Staples Head Wound Jeffrey Fields Scott Assault

Jeffrey Fields

In addition, after Fields was injured there is no sense of urgency about getting him any sort of medical attention. Instead, Scott and his partner, Officer Anthony Martinez, just take him into another room and hold paper towels to his head. In fact Officer  Martinez’ reaction, or more properly lack of one, to Officer Scott’s actions is pretty telling. It’s almost like arrestees being abused is a common sight at the Milton-Freewater  Police Department.

Eventually, Fields did make it to the hospital for what has been described as emergency treatment. As can be seen in the photo to the right, that included a head full of staples to close the wounds to his scalp.

In spite of the seriousness of those injuries and the absolutely unjustifiable nature of his attack on Fields, in April of 2017 Officer Scott was allowed to plead down to lesser charges resulting in a sentence of probation, some community service, and a $500 fine.

That’ll show him.

Note: the audio at the beginning of the video (in the exterior of the building) was affected by some sort of interference that causes a lot of static. That clears up once they go inside.

Related Content on NVCopBlock.org:

“Justice” For The Wealthy, Law Enforcement For The Poor

This post was written by  and originally published at the Center For a Stateless Society (C4SS) under the title “America’s Divided Justice System.” Posts and other content can be submitted to the CopBlock Network via the CopBlock.org Submission Page. (Note: This has been posted in its original form and no edits to the original text were made. Some links were added within the text.)

The post consists of a book review of “The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gapby Matt Taibbi. That book relates to what is effectively two different “justice” systems faced by the wealthy and the poor, minorities, and immigrants. The latter group is the target of enforcement policies such as “broken windows” and “zero tolerance” that emphasize cracking down on even the most minor of crimes, often times consisting of victimless crimes. In contrast, the former group benefits from policies that have come to be referred to as “too be to fail” or “too big to jail” that effectively allow fraud and other financial crimes when committed by wealthy people.

Obviously, the disparity between the ability of wealthy people and poor people to hire lawyers, expend time, and utilize personal connections within that system in order to fight any charges they may face exacerbate those differing experiences with the judicial system even further.

America’s Divided Justice System

The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap by Matt Taibbi (2014).

One does not often find it a pleasant surprise to receive unpleasant information, but this is a reaction many readers will get from Matt Taibbi’s 2014 book The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap. While the book has largely been billed as a piece on the evils of growing economic inequality in the US, a more accurate description would be that it documents the discrepancy in how the American legal system treats wealthy offenders as opposed to poor ones. Taibbi’s thesis is that America’s legal system lets the wealthy get away with massive injustices, while the poor, racial minorities and immigrants are faced with draconian punishments (not to mention nightmarish bureaucracy) for minor violations and even unsubstantiated allegations. The picture he paints is not a pleasant one, but the author’s storytelling ability and grasp of the subject matter make for a surprisingly enjoyable read.

The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap

Matt Taibbi is best known as a generally left-of-center columnist for Rolling Stone, for which he is arguably the star political writer. He has also written for The Nation, Playboy and New York Press as well as several books of his own. While Taibbi is clearly in the liberal or social democratic camp, The Divide offers much that is of interest to libertarians, especially where it criticizes the excesses of bureaucracy and the prosecution of victim-less crimes. Left libertarians especially will appreciate that the book strongly echoes their concerns that the state actively takes actions that make the poor even worse off. While Taibbi uses statistics to make his case, the real driving force of the book is his depictions of specific examples of injustices. In these anecdotes the human consequences of plutocracy are vividly illustrated.

Taibbi alternates between stories of white collar criminal activity going unpunished and mean-spirited state aggression leveled at poor people. This does well to illustrate Taibbi’s point that the rich and poor in America live in two different worlds when it comes to treatment by law enforcement. However it may be the book’s biggest weakness for some readers who will find the back and fourth changes in setting distracting. To his credit, Taibbi ultimately ties his narratives together, asserting that lax treatment for the rich and overly harsh punishment of the poor combine to form a dystopian reality.

Taibbi begins with Eric Holder, the Clinton administration official who would become Attorney General under Barack Obama. In the late nineties Holder authored a memo which made explicit the concept of “Collateral Consequences.” Holder argued that courts could consider the indirect negative economic consequences of subjecting large companies to legal penalties if a court ruled against them. This idea would later become known as “too big to fail” and by extension “too big to jail.”  Between his time with the Clinton and Obama administrations, Holder worked with Covington and Burling, a law firm that pioneered the use of “Collateral Consequences” to keep major companies from facing legal penalties. Taibbi largely credits the Clinton administration for passing laws which  exacerbated the disparity in legal punishment between the rich and the poor. Specifically he notes that Clinton’s presidency marked a time of agreement between democrats and republicans on “getting tough on crime,” specifically crime committed by poor people. leading to the escalated war on drugs and increased prison population (specifically the black prison population) during Clinton’s presidency. This was coupled with an increased leniency towards crimes committed in the financial sector. Taibbi claims it is no coincidence that Goldman Sachs was among the biggest contributors to both Bill Clinton’s and Barack Obama’s presidential campaigns (not to mention Hillary Clinton’s current campaign).

All of this occurred during a sharp decrease in overall crime, which continued through the 2000’s. Taibbi notes that as crime decreased police officers whose performance and promotion potential was evaluated on numbers of arrests were forced to chase increasingly pettier offenses. Police adopted a wide net strategy, comparable to fishing with dynamite, in which large numbers of ostensibly “suspicious” poor or working class people would be searched, arrested, ticketed, or issued summons for minor violations which they may or may not have committed. These offenders almost certainly did not have the time or money to fight the allegations in court. Arrests for marijuana and violations like “blocking pedestrian traffic” sky-rocketed. Taibbi discusses one instance where the accused chose to fight this particular allegation due to the fact that the supposed offense took place on a morning when there was no pedestrian traffic. His own defender and the judge had little knowledge of how to handle this as the entire system is set up to encourage guilty pleas for such offenses. In another instance cops accuse a young man of drawing graffiti in black ink with a pink highlighter. Unsurprisingly police cruelty, dishonesty and downright stupidity are often on full display in this book.

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Taibbi gives a great deal of attention to Howard Safir, the Giuliani-appointed New York Police Commissioner, who expanded the “Broken Windows” and “Zero Tolerance” policies of his more well known predecessor Bill Bratton, with an even greater focus on arresting and fining people for petty offenses. Under Safir, arrests for marijuana sky rocketed. Taibbi notes that the accused faced hours on end at court hearings, in which large numbers of cases are reviewed by judges who themselves would rather be anywhere else. The court appearances and other bureaucratic red tape often forced the accused to take time off from work or seek child care that they otherwise would not have to. Taibbi discusses many of the violations reviewed as “administrative crimes” which while technically illegal do not cause demonstrable harm to anyone. While crime with actual victims had gone down, police focused on violations of arbitrary statutes. Illegal immigration is one example. Taibbi relates this to occurrences of police setting up “drunk driving” checkpoints at the roads going in and out of immigrant neighborhoods during times when people would come and go to work. He notes that the increased deportations that occurred under the Obama administration enabled a massive kidnapping industry in Latin America, in which kidnappers would locate deportees while seeking ransoms from their remaining relatives in the US.

Elsewhere Taibbi discusses the collapse of Lehman Brothers and its secret backroom deal with the English firm Barclays that ripped off millions from smaller creditors around the world. This section is an excellent primer on the lead-up to the 2008 financial crisis. As is the chapter on JPMorgan Chase, which committed massive fraud involving fake credit card judgement. He notes that the business of collecting delinquent credit card debt itself relies on fraud, as it would be uneconomical for collection agencies to review the actual records of the alleged debtors. Often they instead employ “robo-signing” (the practice of having entry level staffers sign as many documents as possible, without actually reading them) and “gutter service” where a server may or may not deliver a summons to an accused who may or may not show up to contest the allegation. In all cases discussed, real people are genuinely harmed and the perpetrators are never given more than negligible fines. He also contrasts the treatment of crimes committed by HSBC (a firm that has worked with murderous drug cartels and Islamist terrorists) to the disproportionately worse treatment of small time drug users.

In one of the more interesting stories of the book, a gang of well-funded hedge fund managers attempt to bully the owner of a smaller insurance firm, Fairfax Financial Holdings, into going out of business through an elaborate campaign of harassment, threats, late-night phone calls, and phony accusations of a criminal activity. This may be of interest to libertarians looking for a starting point to a discussion of what forms of malicious activity do and do not violate the non-aggression principle. Similarly, Taibbi’s discussion of welfare recipients who largely forgo their right to freedom from government search and seizure without probable cause is a potential starting point for conversation. Such people are often subject to inspectors rooting through their underwear drawers and bathrooms looking for evidence of unreported income. While Taibbi’s sympathy for people on welfare may rub some mainstream libertarians the wrong way, he argues that regardless whether one opposes the welfare state or not, one should find this excessive, especially when such zeal for fraud prevention is not matched when it comes to white-collar criminals committing the same crimes on a larger scale.

Banner - Tunnel1Overall Taibbi finds that the poor are subject to bureaucracy while the rich are able to become bureaucracies in and of themselves by hiring lawyers capable of generating decades of red tape for anyone who makes any accusation against them. He feels that America has such love for and fear of people with power and money and disdain for those who lack it, that its people allow two divergent class-based legal systems to govern. The book is an engaging and often entertaining read that will likely find a sympathetic ear from anyone who values justice.

Jails and the “Justice” System Punish the Poor For Being Poor

This post was written by and originally published at the Center For a Stateless Society (C4SS) under the title “Prisons Don’t Bail Out the Poor.” Posts and other content can be submitted to the CopBlock Network via the CopBlock.org Submission Page. (Note: This has been posted in its original form and no edits to the original text were made. Some links were added within the text.)

This post relates to the exploitation of the poor and vulnerable members of society by law enforcement and the court system. Oftentimes, people of lower economic classes and especially minorities within that demographic end up in jail and/or prison simply because they don’t have the means to defend themselves from allegations made against them. This also makes it that much more likely innocent people will accept plea deals just to avoid serving more jail time while awaiting trial and/or to avoid the risk of more severe punishment should they lose.

A significant percentage of those “crimes” they are prosecuted for are victimless crimes in the first place and many are actually predicated on conditions created by poverty. In addition, minor crimes of that nature often lead to more harsh punishments for future transgressions by creating a long criminal record that is used to justify tougher sentences, even though that record consists of things more affluent people would never be arrested or prosecuted for. In many cases, building a criminal record based on such minor offenses is an intentional strategy used by law enforcement against the poor for that very reason.

Previous posts by Nick Ford that have been shared on CopBlock.org can be found here, here, here, and here. If you appreciate the things Nick has written, you can support him directly here.

Prisons Don’t Bail Out the Poor

The New York Times recently reported that on March 13th, Jeffery Pendleton was found dead in his jail cell. Pendleton was a homeless man who lived in New Hampshire and had been arrested on March 8th for outstanding fines and possession of small amounts of marijuana. His set bail of $100 was prohibitively costly for him and he was left to languish in his cell until trial, over a month later.

According to New Hampshire’s state experts, there were no sign of foul play.

Pendleton’s family disagrees, saying on a GoFundMe campaign that aims to bring Pendleton’s body home: “His body has been viewed by a second source and we have found that we were lied to by the medical examiner in New Hampshire as well as the jail. … The second report completed in Arkansas states there are clear indications that Jeffery was harmed prior to his death and likely that harmed caused his death.”

Pendleton’s death, whether a freak accident or something more, reflects a disturbing trend of individuals, particularly lower-income and people of color, dying in jail cells. Another high-profile victim, a black woman named Sandra Bland, died after only three days in jail in 2013. Her death was ruled a suicide but her family, like Pendleton’s, disagreed.

Prison Profits Poor PeopleIn practice, jails tend to work as places where lower-income people must be processed and held until they can be processed again. As Gilles Bissonnette, a director for the American Civil Liberties Union of New Hampshire said of Pendleton’s case, “at that point, he would have effectively served his sentence before he ever had an opportunity to contest the charge — an outcome that only a poor person would be confronted with.”

The issue of prohibitively high bail is serious enough that the Department of Justice (DoJ) released an official statement around the time of Pendleton’s death. Such statements don’t have the force of law, but they can influence shifts in policy by making the federal government’s position clear on a given issue.

At one point the statement says “[b]ail that is set without regard to defendants’ financial capacity can result in the incarceration of individuals not because they pose a threat to public safety or a flight risk, but rather because they cannot afford the assigned bail amount.”

As such, jails are often used as pre-detention centers that skirt around Constitutional requirements of “fair and equal treatment” under the law. If poor people are regularly locked up and have bail set without regard to their ability to pay then equality under the law seems like an unlikely outcome.

But even if we tried to make bail set partly on the basis of financial stability and well-being, this would not be enough. Whether it comes to police and civil forfeiture, the criminal justice system and plea deals, or the prison industrial complex, the state’s profit motive leads them to seek monopoly profits to the disadvantage of the accused and convicted.

As the New York Times notes, this report by the DoJ, “…echoes the conclusions of the Justice Department’s investigation of the Police Department and court in Ferguson, Mo. Investigators there concluded that the court was a moneymaking venture, not an independent branch of government.”

But “independence” is a meaningless term when the government has created and reinforced perverse incentives that treat individuals as a stream of revenue. Fixing that isn’t going to be accomplished by sending letters to courts and politely asking them to change. In fact, the way to affect change isn’t to ask nicely for the government to play by its own rules. We’ve been doing that for too long to no avail.

It’s time we made up our own rules and played by them ourselves in peaceful and creative ways. This means building alternative forms of dealing with crime that don’t rely on punishment being the focus of rehabilitation. It also means not treating money as the sole way that people can help atone for their offenses.

But of course, Pendleton didn’t do anything wrong.

Well, besides being poor.

Evidence Suggests India Cummings’ In-Custody Death Was a Homicide

The following post consists of a press release that was shared with the CopBlock Network by Matthew Albert, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. Albert is the attorney for India Cummings, who died under suspicious circumstances while in custody at the Erie County Holding Center.

In addition, Albert states:

Please contact me with any questions. This story needs to be told. Thank you – Matt

Date of Incident: February 1 – February 17, 2016
Department Involved: The Erie County (NY) Sheriff’s Department
Officers Involved: Erie County Sheriff Timothy Howard and all sheriff’s deputies assigned to the Erie County Holding Center.
Department Phone Number: (716) 858-7618

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 26, 2016

Buffalo, NY – India Cummings, 27, was in the throes of mental illness, clearly incapacitated and incapable of taking care of herself when she was put into custody at the Erie County Holding Center on February 1st, 2016 after a series of irrational actions.

Despite frantic efforts by family members and her attorney to transfer her to a hospital where she could have been stabilized, she was stashed away mysteriously in the Holding Center for 16 days. On February 17, 2016, Erie County Sheriff Timothy Howard states a “medical event happened,” and India was transported to Buffalo General Hospital.

However, by then…it was way too late. Upon her admission, she had a broken arm, broken ribs, severe dehydration, a blood clot in her leg that would have required the amputation of her leg, and her kidneys were failing. She was brain dead and in cardiac arrest. Sheriff Howard fails to mention what conceivable medical event occurred that could have caused all those conditions.

On February 21, 2016, Ms. Cummings’ remaining organs crashed, and she died. Howard and Acting Erie County District Attorney Mike Flaherty have done exactly what you would expect them to do when a young black girl dies in such a tragic and suspicious manner in county care…absolutely nothing. Howard went on record today to say he is “more than satisfied,” by everything he has seen so far relating to her care.

However, when a clearly incapacitated individual is put into County custody, it is the County’s duty to care for her, as she cannot care for herself. Here, best case scenario, under County supervision, India was allowed to wither away and die in a three-week period, having nothing in her system upon her admission to the hospital. Legally speaking, That conduct would constitute criminally negligent homicide.

Worst case scenario, India was beaten until there was nothing left and deprived of necessary food and water in that 16 days time frame. That conduct would amount to intentional or depraved indifference murder. Either way, there is criminal liability present in this girls’ demise. If this was some white doctor’s kid who was in such a precarious mental state, he would have been hospitalized as opposed to left to rot in jail.

An autopsy has been done by the County’s Medical Examiners, who unsurprisingly are clinging tight to the results. This matter is now being reviewed by the State Commission of Corrections. The Erie County Holding Center has been under federal oversight due to their track record of abuse and poor supervision of prisoners in their care.

Via BuffaloNews.com: Mysteries Surround Sudden Death of Erie County Holding Center Inmate

Matthew Albert Esq.
The Law Offices of Matthew Albert
Mobile Office 716-445-4119
[email protected]

Via Facebook:

A tragic and horrific case: My client India Cummings, in the throes of mental illness, clearly incapacitated and…

Posted by The Law Offices of Matthew Albert Esq. on Friday, February 26, 2016

Las Vegas Police Make It Very Clear They Don’t Understand the First Amendment at Chalk Protest

LVMPD CCDC Chalk Protest

Two Can Play That Game

On September 9th, members of Nevada Cop Block and the Sunset Activist Collective were doing a chalk protest at the Clark County Detention Center (CCDC) in Downtown Las Vegas. Things were pretty quiet and peaceful until a bunch of gang members working for the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD) showed up to harass and intimidate us, even though we weren’t doing anything illegal or in any way disruptive.

They started out by admitting that we weren’t being detained (and therefore not suspected of a crime), but stated that they would like for us to leave. I politely told them (and wrote, as you can see to the left) that we would like for THEM to leave.

At that point, the sergeant (badge #5906) and several (but not all) of the other officers, did in fact leave. However, as they were (jay)walking away they indicated that they were going to go call some patrol officers because it’s illegal for us to chalk there, which is very much not true.

Shortly after, they returned and began making it very clear that they didn’t understand the First Amendment or that wacky Free Speech thing that it protects. The sergeant stated that he was concerned about the content of the messages we were writing. Then when questioned about what the 1st Amendment says and how that might apply to his concerns, he seemed to genuinely not know and kinda just repeated variations of his concern about what we were writing as if it was a mantra they taught him in the academy.



He did briefly manage to expand on that once by stating that he was concerned the content of our First Amendment protected speech would incite people to violence against cops, in spite of the fact that nothing we wrote was violent or urging any sort of violence against anyone. It was merely an exercise of our Constitutionally protected right to Free Speech to protest police brutality and murders by cops.

I pointed out that it is all the blatant instances of police murdering people, often on video, that is inciting people, not us telling people about it. He didn’t seemed to be able to grasp the connection and actually stated that all those videos of cops murdering people were “irrelevant.”

That is actually really telling, in regards to the current attitudes and actions of many police officers. Many of them seem to actually believe that manufacturing a fake “War On Cops” and using that as a justification to double down on their own violence is the solution to all of the hatred and even violence that they are beginning to feel from the public. It certainly is one of the reasons that the police in Las Vegas have such little support among the residents here.

Then everyone stood around for over half an hour while they tried to intimidate us and we waited for these patrol officers to show up and harass and/or threaten us. At one point, someone who appeared to be an off-duty cop drove up, parked facing the wrong direction, and had a little chat with them. Afterwards, he did an illegal U-turn and parked the wrong direction (this time also in a fire lane) on the other side of the road, so he could chat with another officer on that sidewalk.

Murder=Paid Vacation (For Cops)

Murder = Paid Vacation (For Cops)

I got kinda bored then, so I started asking some questions. For the record, I never did get an answer on whether there’s a basketball court upstairs in the jail. Nor did they give me a clear answer on whether they still use those old-timely jail house keys or if there’s any correlation between the shade of their uniforms and their rank. I’m still considering whether to file a FOIA request on those, but I probably won’t.

Then they apparently got word from the patrol officers that they were full of shit, we weren’t doing anything illegal, and nobody was going to waste their time coming down to tell them that. So they (jay)walked back over to the jail and went inside.

All in all, the eight or so cops (five jail guards, one officer who appeared to be with the gang unit, an undercover unit, one patrol unit that was parked around the corner, and a Nevada Highway Patrol unit that might have just been passing through) that wasted about an hour on something they should have known was legal in the first place, served as a great example why the LVMPD keeps claiming it needs to extort Las Vegas citizens for even more money to hire additional cops.

(Note: This video is pretty long, so I tried to shorten it as much as possible by literally cutting out any pauses. For the sake of accuracy and transparency, I’ve also embedded the full 36+ minute raw video below. So you can watch the full unedited version, if you are inclined to do so. Mostly what was cut out was about ten minutes of dead air when we were just waiting for the patrol officers they had called to show up.)

Click Banner to learn more about filming the police

Click Banner to learn more about filming the police

Raw Video

“Illegal Garbage Collector” Given Reprieve from Jail Sentence in Georgia (Update)

Note: This is an update of a previous post, entitled “Picking up Trash In Georgia is Mandatory Jail Time!” which detailed the situation of  Atlanta area garbage man Kevin McGill, who was sentenced last month to 30 days of jail because he started work early. That violated a Sandy Springs city ordinance against collecting garbage before 7 AM.

KevinI’m not exactly certain if the City of Sandy Springs, GA’s heart grew three sizes just because they actually realized they were being overly harsh or if it was all the bad publicity that it generated (it was the bad PR), but the man who was ordered to be jailed for 30 days because he showed up for work early has actually had his charges dropped. Apparently though, he had already served two days of that original sentence (reporting to jail the evening of his 48th birthday) prior to being given the reprieve. However, he no longer has to serve the remaining 28 days.

According to the Daily Mail, prosecutors (like pretty much everyone else) realized that the sentence was too harsh:

“…Sandy Springs Solicitors Office released a statement on Monday announcing that charges had been dropped after realizing that ‘there are times when taking a step back provides the opportunity for better perspective’.

The statement read: ‘In retrospect, the actions of the court with regards to Mr. McGill’s sentence for violating the city’s noise laws, was disproportionate to a first-time offense.

‘As such, the court has amended its sentence to time served and further probation suspended.”

In spite of the ridiculousness of the original sentence, it’s obviously good that he is now free of that nonsense. It is also a good indication of the value of things like call floods and accountability sites such as CopBlock.org that generate negative attention for these type of overbearing actions from police and government officials.

From the original Post on Cop Block:

“Picking Up Trash in Georgia is Mandatory Jail Time!”

You read that correctly, Kevin McGill was recently sentenced to 30 days in jail for picking up trash too early. Now you might think that Kevin is one of the people we’ve all seen picking through trash for recyclables, or metals, for money. There’d be nothing wrong with that, if it was what he was doing. IMO, that’s more honorable than collecting welfare or (obviously) stealing from people. Yet, Kevin is actually employed by the Sanitation Department in Sandy Springs, GA.

So it seems that when Kevin’s boss, who’s basically the city of Sandy Springs (the same entity that’s going to cage him), set his schedule they were asking him to break the law. The city has an ordinance stating that trash must be picked up between 7 am and 7 pm…Read the full post on CopBlock here

click here

click here

NYPD Cop Caught Planting Drugs on Innocent People Cries At Sentencing, Receives Probation

The following post was shared with the CopBlock Network anonymously, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. It was originally published at the Gothamist by

The post details the court appearance of Jason Arbeeny, an NYPD cop who was caught planting drugs on innocent people in order to meet department arrest quaotas. During his sentencing hearing he began crying and begging the judge not to send him to jail. Amazingly enough, the judge actually stated that he had intended to sentence Arbeeny to jailtime, but instead decided to give him a probation as a result of his courtroom breakdown.

Do you think things would have gone the same for anyone who hadn’t committed their crimes while wearing a Magic Suit and Shiny Badge or was this just the typical Policeman’s Discount in action?

If you have a video, personal story involving police misconduct and/or abuse, or commentary about a law enforcement related news story, we would be happy to have you submit it. You can find some advice on how to get your submission published on the CopBlock Network within this post.

Click the banner to submit content to CopBlock.org

Click the banner to submit content to CopBlock.org

The Brooklyn South narcotics detective who was convicted of planting drugs on a woman and her boyfriend was sentenced to five years’ probation and 300 hours of community service. Former cop Jason Arbeeny, a 14-year NYPD veteran, was previously found guilty of eight counts of falsifying records and official misconduct for planting drugs on innocent suspects—a crime he claimed he did in order to reach quotas. Arbeeny broke down in tears at his sentencing today: “I can’t look at myself in the mirror anymore,” Arbeeny told Brooklyn Supreme Court Justice Gustin Reichbach. “Sir, I am begging you, please don’t send me to jail.”

Arbeeny tearfully apologized to his victims: “My oath went down the window, my pride went out the window,” he said. And Reichbach was moved by his tears: “I came into court this morning determined that the nature of this crime requires some jail time,” he said. “I frankly didn’t expect the defendant, at the 11th hour, to be making these claims.” Arbeeny, who mentioned that his young son is in therapy after threatening suicide over his father’s fate, was facing up to four years in prison.

Arbeeny had been found guilty of “flaking”—planting a twist of crack under a car seat during a Coney Island bust in January 2007—and for doctoring paperwork to make the arrest last. Altogether, “flaking” has reportedly cost the city $1.2 million to settle cases of false arrests.

During the trial, Justice Reichbach made a direct connection between “flaking” and the arrest quotas which the NYPD has repeatedly denied exist, or referred to as “productivity goals”—Reichbach noted that several witnesses said narcotics officers were expected to make 60 percent of their arrests for felonies and that cops would spread collars around so they could all meet the quotas. He specifically pointed to the “mindset in Narcotics that seemingly embraces a cowboy culture where anything goes in the never-ending war on drugs.”