Tag Archives: impound fees

Colorado Police Planned to Sell 80-Year Old Crime Victim’s Car Instead of Returning It To Her

Colorado Springs Police Car Auction Senior Citizen Victim

When 80 year old Mary Antrim’s stolen car was used in a robbery, Colorado Springs police told her it was on hold as evidence, then tried to auction it off without notifying her.

Back in June, Mary Antrim’s car, a Ford Crown Victoria, was stolen in Pueblo, Colorado. A few days later, it was recovered about 45 miles away by police in Colorado Springs after the unnamed person(s) who stole it used it in an aggravated robbery.

However, instead of returning her car once they recovered it, Colorado Springs police informed Antrim that it was being held as evidence. Then Antrim says they stopped answering her calls. The next time she heard anything her car, it had been scheduled to be auctioned off.

Via KOAA.com:

“They (police) told me it was involved in a robbery and that it was being held for evidence and that’s all I was told,” Mary said.

That information was give to Mary on June 5—more than a month ago!

“I’ve called them (police) every week to find out where the car is at and what’s going on with the car,” Mary said. “No one has called me back.”

Fast fast forward to July 10—Mary logs onto her computer and discovers her car is set to be auctioned off in September.

“I was dumbfounded,” she said. “I thought how in the world can the car go from being on hold for evidence and now it’s on hand and being ready to go to auction. I couldn’t believe that…”

“I need my car for my doctors appointments that I have to go to,” Mary said. “That’s my transportation and I’m 80 years old and I’d like to have my car back so I can do what I have to do.”

At that point, Antrim contacted one of those consumer investigation teams for a local news station. When KOAA News 5, the local NBC affiliate, called on her behalf they were told that the car was up for auction because she owed $178 for impound fees.

The problem with that answer, though, is that the Colorado Springs Police Department policy states that crime victims whose cars are impounded are not supposed to be charged storage fees. Another issue is that neither Antrim, nor her husband Clyde, were ever informed that the car had been released from the hold that had been placed on it as evidence.

In fact, the CSPD was even caught a lie regarding the latter requirement. When question, the department initially claimed that they had sent a letter to the Antrims on July 7th stated that the car had been released and giving them until September 11th to claim it before it would be auctioned.

However, the letter that was sent out was postmarked July 11th. By some odd coincidence, that just happened to be the same day that the TV station first contacted the Colorado Springs police about Antrim’s car.

Fortunately for Antrim, in the end, once the media was involved the police waived all of the impound fees (that she should have never been charged in the first place). The next day, her car was released and she was able to go down and reclaim it with being extorted out of any money first.

Meanwhile, the Colorado Springs Police Department hasn’t apologized or even offered an explanation for their “mistake.” Reportedly, they stated that they are “looking into it,” though. And we all know how thorough those internal investigations tend to be. I’m sure they’ll get right to the bottom of this whole thing.

KOAA.com | Continuous News | Colorado Springs and Pueblo

Leave a comment

California Cop Bobby Carrillo Released From Jail Early Because He Was Sad And Homesick

King City CA Bobby Carrillo

Officer Bobby Carrillo of the King City Police Department in Northern California has been released from jail after serving less than three months of a one year jail sentence. Monterey County Judge Julie Culver approved his request to serve the remainder of that sentence on house arrest.

In March, Carrillo pled no contest to charges in which he was accused of being the “mastermind” of a scheme involving six cops total, including two chiefs, in which they had low-income and minority residents’ cars illegally towed after stopping them without probable cause in a scheme to profit personally.

By preying on poor people, mostly of Latino background, Carrillo targeted those he knew would be unable to pay the impound fees to get their cars back. Part of the scheme was that for every ten cars his mafia crew stole Carrillo would get to keep one himself.

What was the reason for his early release from the Monterey County Jail you might ask. It was because he was depressed and wanted to go home. Plus, he had lost weight and the other inmates didn’t like him because he is a former cop.

Via KSBW “Action 8 News,” the local NBC affiliate in Monterey County:

A disgraced former King City police officer, Bobby Carrillo, was feeling depressed while serving a 1-year jail sentence and wanted to go home, according to prosecutors

On Thursday, Monterey County Judge Julie Culver granted Carrillo’s request to be released from jail and serve the remainder of his sentence on home confinement.

The judge’s decision surprised and disappointed prosecutors.

“We disagree with the judge. We feel police officers should be held to a higher standard,” Deputy District Attorney Steve Somers said.

Carrillo had been behind bars since April 29, and he served fewer than three months in the Monterey County Jail.

Defense attorney Susan Chapman said Carrillo had lost 30 pounds, his mental and physical health was suffering, and he received death threats.

Being an inmate was especially hard on Carrillo because he was held in a small, isolated cell, where he had very limited contact with other people, Chapman said. Carrillo was held in isolation to protect him from other inmates.

“Mr. Carrillo had been treated harsher than other individuals convicted of the same type of (charges),” Chapman said.

District Attorney Dean Flippo said he had no doubts that Carrillo felt uncomfortable as an inmate because he was a former police officer.

However, “(Carrillo’s) status as a former peace officer cannot be adequate to eliminate jail as an appropriate punishment.

Although jail is a difficult place for former police officers, that should exist as an extra deterrent to violating the law,” Flippo argued in a letter to the judge.

“The defendant has provided no evidence of medical necessity to change his jail sentence. Every inmate can obviously state that he is uncomfortable in jail. Surely this should not be the standard to have a jail sentence changed,” Flippo said.

But Culver sided with Carrillo’s defense attorney.

Attention people!! The G700 Flashlight is indestructible and the brightest light you have EVER seen. Order yours now at 75% OFF:Click Graphic NOW

Attention people!! The G700 Flashlight is indestructible and the brightest light you have EVER seen. Order yours now at 75% OFF:Click Graphic NOW

Of course, anyone who has been to jail or knows someone that has been to jail knows that everyone is unhappy about being there and would rather be sitting at home. It’s also pretty common to lose a bunch of weight from the inedible food that is given to inmates. Some people might even argue that jail being unpleasant is kinda the point.

Even the one valid issue of danger from other inmates is just a matter of degrees. When you throw people into an overcrowded cage and treat them like animals they often respond as such. They certainly will be a little more threatening toward someone who played a part in the system that put them in that cage, but other inmates face the possibility of violence also.

It looks like these Bad Apples have found yet another way to make sure they receive their Policeman’s Discount whenever the Good Cops are forced (kicking and screaming) to go through the motions of acting like they want to hold them accountable.

“I’m homesick and the other inmates are being mean to me” will likely be taking it’s place next to “I feared for my life” and he reached for his waistband/my gun” in the magical get out of jail free cards they keep handy just in case.

Leave a comment

California Cop Released From Jail Early Because He “Was Depressed And Wanted To Go Home”

Officer Bobby Carrillo of the King City Police Department in Northern California has been released from jail after serving less than three months of a one year jail sentence. Monterey County Judge Julie Culver approved his request to serve the remainder of that sentence on house arrest.

In March, Carrillo pled no contest to charges in which he was accused of being the “mastermind” of a scheme involving six cops total, including two chiefs, in which they had low-income and minority residents’ cars illegally towed after stopping them without probable cause in a scheme to profit personally.

By preying on poor people, mostly of Latino background, Carrillo targeted those he knew would be unable to pay the impound fees to get their cars back. Part of the scheme was that for every ten cars his mafia crew stole Carrillo would get to keep one himself.

What was the reason for his early release from the Monterey County Jail you might ask. It was because he was depressed and wanted to go home. Plus, he had lost weight and the other inmates didn’t like him because he is a former cop.

Via KSBW “Action 8 News,” the local NBC affiliate in Monterey County:

A disgraced former King City police officer, Bobby Carrillo, was feeling depressed while serving a 1-year jail sentence and wanted to go home, according to prosecutors

On Thursday, Monterey County Judge Julie Culver granted Carrillo’s request to be released from jail and serve the remainder of his sentence on home confinement.

The judge’s decision surprised and disappointed prosecutors.

“We disagree with the judge. We feel police officers should be held to a higher standard,” Deputy District Attorney Steve Somers said.

Carrillo had been behind bars since April 29, and he served fewer than three months in the Monterey County Jail.

Defense attorney Susan Chapman said Carrillo had lost 30 pounds, his mental and physical health was suffering, and he received death threats.

Being an inmate was especially hard on Carrillo because he was held in a small, isolated cell, where he had very limited contact with other people, Chapman said. Carrillo was held in isolation to protect him from other inmates.

“Mr. Carrillo had been treated harsher than other individuals convicted of the same type of (charges),” Chapman said.

District Attorney Dean Flippo said he had no doubts that Carrillo felt uncomfortable as an inmate because he was a former police officer.

However, “(Carrillo’s) status as a former peace officer cannot be adequate to eliminate jail as an appropriate punishment.

Although jail is a difficult place for former police officers, that should exist as an extra deterrent to violating the law,” Flippo argued in a letter to the judge.

“The defendant has provided no evidence of medical necessity to change his jail sentence. Every inmate can obviously state that he is uncomfortable in jail. Surely this should not be the standard to have a jail sentence changed,” Flippo said.

But Culver sided with Carrillo’s defense attorney.

Attention people!! The G700 Flashlight is indestructible and the brightest light you have EVER seen. Order yours now at 75% OFF:Click Graphic NOW

Attention people!! The G700 Flashlight is indestructible and the brightest light you have EVER seen. Order yours now at 75% OFF:Click Graphic NOW

Of course, anyone who has been to jail or knows someone that has been to jail knows that everyone is unhappy about being there and would rather be sitting at home. It’s also pretty common to lose a bunch of weight from the inedible food that is given to inmates. Some people might even argue that jail being unpleasant is kinda the point.

Even the one valid issue of danger from other inmates is just a matter of degrees. When you throw people into an overcrowded cage and treat them like animals they often respond as such. They certainly will be a little more threatening toward someone who played a part in the system that put them in that cage, but other inmates face the possibility of violence also.

It looks like these Bad Apples have found yet another way to make sure they receive their Policeman’s Discount whenever the Good Cops are forced (kicking and screaming) to go through the motions of acting like they want to hold them accountable.

“I’m homesick and the other inmates are being mean to me” will likely be taking its place next to “I feared for my life” and “he reached for his waistband/my gun” in their deck of magical get out of jail free cards they keep handy just in case they get caught doing something that creates a lot of publicity and makes it impossible for other cops to just ignore it.

Leave a comment