Tag Archives: harassing the homeless

San Diego Cop Who Committed Perjury Exposed by His Own Body Cam Video

San Diego Police Officer Perjury Body Camera Homeless Citation

San Diego Police Officer Colin Governski’s own body cam video exposed that he had committed perjury while testifying against a homeless man.

In August of 2015, Officer Colin Governski of the San Diego Police Department was in the process of harassing some homeless people who were camping near a beach. Shortly after, Governski saw another homeless man, Tony Diaz, come out of a nearby bathroom.

He then began accusing Diaz of living out of his truck and after initially indicating that he was warning him about doing so, he quickly decided instead to give him a citation. That citation was based on a San Diego law that prohibits people from living within a vehicle that is parked on public property.

In court, Officer Governski testified that he had caught Diaz sleeping inside the back of his truck. However, Diaz maintained that he was just using the bathroom prior to going fishing at the beach. He also stated that a friend allows him to park on their privately owned property overnight. In spite of his insistence that he had not been sleeping in his truck at the time, based on Governski’s testimony, Diaz was found guilty of “vehicle habitation” and fined $280.

Later, the lawyer representing Diaz filed an appeal of that conviction in order to challenge the constitutionality of the ordinance against living in a car. A similar law in Los Angeles had already been struck down as unconstitutional by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in 2014.

During the appeal process, it was discovered that Officer Governski had been wearing a body camera that day. (See video embedded below.) The unnecessary arrogance and mean spirited nature of the harassment shown on that video is appalling by itself. More importantly though, the body cam footage clearly showed Diaz was walking out of the bathroom and not sleeping in the back of his truck when Ofc. Governski first encountered him.

As a result of the contradiction between Governski’s testimony and what’s shown on the video, the conviction was reversed. However, Governski has yet to be charged with perjury. And it’s not because he doesn’t warrant such a charge. During the original trial, Governski had lied directly to the judge while under oath when he was specifically asked several times if Diaz was sleeping in the back of the truck when he found him. For anyone without one of those Magic Uniforms, that’s a felony.

This wasn’t even the first time he was caught lying and filing false charges to harass someone, either. In 2014, the taxpayers of San Diego were forced to pay $15,000 to another homeless person Governski had falsely arrested. On top of that, he had also violated SDPD policy by not noting on the citation that there was body camera footage available, which is why it wasn’t presented at the trial.

Nobody should hold their breath waiting for Officer Governski (or any other cop) to be charged with or in any meaningful way punished for perjury, regardless of how obvious and outrageous the lies they tell are. In fact, the San Diego City Attorney’s Office indicated that they had not even reported Governski’s conduct to internal affairs or his supervisor when asked by his attorney.

Of course, as Tony Diaz’ attorney, Coleen Cusack, pointed out, if they will lie about such a minor citation what won’t they lie about? For the sake of yourself and anyone else you see being harassed or abused by the police,  film the police.

 

San Antonio Cop Caught Trying to Feed Shit Sandwich to Homeless Man Fired (Again) for 2nd Feces Related Incident

In November, I posted about San Antonio Police Officer Mathew Luckhurst who had tried to feed a sandwich filled with dog poop to a homeless man:

Luckhurst had bragged to another cop that he had placed feces inside bread and put it in a styrofoam container next to a sleeping homeless man, hoping he would eat it. That unnamed officer fortunately had some decency and told Officer Luckhurst to go back and throw the shit sandwich away. He then reported the incident to the San Antonio Police Dept.’s Internal Affairs Bureau in July.

Subsequently, the suspension was recommended by both a civilian review board and a review board comprising sworn officers. in October. After a meeting with Officer Luckhurst, San Antonio Police Chief William McManus upheld the suspension. Earlier today, both he and San Antonio Mayor Ivy Taylor released statements regarding Luckhurst’s behavior.

As I noted at the time, although it was reported that he had been fired, that was really a bit of a technicality because he actually has been “indefinitely suspended.” In reality, the intention is probably just to buy a little time until the publicity quiets down and then have the local police union play bad cop and file a dispute that ends up getting him his job back.

However, yesterday some new information emerged showing that this was not the only time that Officer Luckhurst’s feces fetish has gotten him into hot water with the SAPD. In fact, he seems to have been building on that as his go to prop for workplace pranks. And this time he even enlisted a sidekick.

Via MySanAntonio.com:

In June, just a month after the incident with the sandwich, police say Luckhurst defecated in the women’s bathroom stall at SAPD’s Bike Patrol Office and spread a brown substance with the consistency of tapioca on the toilet seat, giving the appearance that there was feces on the seat.

Officer Steve Albart was also involved in the prank, according to the records. He was originally given an indefinite suspension, but Chief William McManus reduced it to 30 days without pay. Albart finished serving that suspension Jan. 19.
Unlike Officer Albart, Luckhurst’s suspension was not reduced and he received a second indefinite suspension. So, now Officer Luckhurst has been “fired” twice (although he’s apparently still officially on the roster and in the process of appealing both suspensions). Expect him back out there protecting and serving (shit) at some point in the near future.

San Antonio Police Officer Matthew Luckhurst Fired for Trying to Feed Shit Sandwich to Homeless Man

Officer Matthew Luckhurst of the San Antonio Police Department has been placed on indefinite suspension as the result of an incident in May. Luckhurst had bragged to another cop that he had placed feces inside bread and put it in a styrofoam container next to a sleeping homeless man, hoping he would eat it. That unnamed officer fortunately had some decency and told Officer Luckhurst to go back and throw the shit sandwich away. He then reported the incident to the San Antonio Police Dept.’s Internal Affairs Bureau in July.

Subsequently, the suspension was recommended by both a civilian review board and a review board comprising sworn officers. in October. After a meeting with Officer Luckhurst, San Antonio Police Chief William McManus upheld the suspension. Earlier today, both he and San Antonio Mayor Ivy Taylor released statements regarding Luckhurst’s behavior.

Via KVUE.com, the local ABC affiliate:

“This was a vile and disgusting act that violates our guiding principles of “treating all with integrity, compassion, fairness and respect’,” said Chief McManus. “The fact that his fellow officers were so disgusted with his actions that they reported him to Internal Affairs demonstrates that this type of behavior will never be tolerated.”

Mayor Ivy Taylor also released a statement Friday regarding the incident. “Firing this officer was the right thing to do,” Mayor Taylor said. “His actions were a betrayal of every value we have in our community, and he is not representative of our great police force.”

It’s not entirely clear from the news reports of the “indefinite suspension” equates to an actual firing or if that is still in the process of happening. According to MySanAntonio.com, Officer Luckhurst is planning to appeal the suspension/firing. Although Luckhurst declined to comment to the media, his lawyer, Ben Sifuentes, it was all just a joke that “spiraled out of control.”

Homeless people are frequently the targets of bullying and police are often some of the biggest bullies around. The stigma attached to being homeless and the criminalization of  homelessness are huge issues within most, if not all, cities throughout the country. Having worked with Food Not Bombs Las Vegas and personally witnessed the abusive manner that a good majority of police officers behave toward homeless people, I have very little doubt that it happened, even though he likely did consider it a joke. (And it certainly did spiral out of control for him.)

I also don’t have a lot of doubt that he will win his appeal and be reinstated. When you have free rein to murder people, trying to serve someone a shit sandwich is small potatoes. And if all else fails, he can always just move to the next police department over and continue as if nothing ever happened.

Harassment by Police for Using a Public Park in King City Oregon

The following post and the video included with it were shared with the CopBlock Network by Theodore Pojman, via the CopBlock Submissions Page.

The video shows Officer Hyson of the King City Police Department extorting them for being in a public park, presumably because they are homeless and live in their truck.

According to Officer Hyson, this constitutes “illegal camping” (he eventually decides to extort them for criminal trespassing instead), even though they’ve done nothing except sleep in their truck.

Criminalization of homelessness is not a new thing. Many cities have passed laws that go so far as barring people from voluntarily sharing food with other people in public.

Oregon in particular has passed these “camping” bans which are explicitly intended to target and allow police harassment of homeless people.

Should someone’s economic situation really preclude people from using public spaces when their only “crime” is having nowhere else to go?

Date of Incident: July 1, 2016
Officer Involved: Officer Hyson Badge# 26709, Deputy Fletcher
Department Involved: King City (Oregon) Police Department
Facebook Page: King City – Oregon Police Department
File a Complaint: Online Complaint Form
Department Phone No.: (503) 620-8851

My friends and I were at King City Park at 8 in the morning when we were approached by a rude policeman named Officer Hyson.

He woke me up from a nap and demanded identification from us. I refused to present my license, because I was too tired to look for it, and instead gave verbal identification. He asked me for my social security number which I refused to give.

He seemed offended, called me “junior lawyer” and threatened to cite us for criminal trespass if we weren’t gone in one hour. It was during the park’s open hours. Fifty-five minutes later, after I had finished eating breakfast and was starting the van about to leave, officer friendly pulled up behind me to write me a ticket.

I explained to him that we weren’t committing a crime by being in the park, and that he had no evidence that we were “camping” overnight. He demanded that I present ID, I refused. He demanded that we step out of the vehicle. We refused. He then stuck his hand in the window uncomfortably close to me. I told him to retract his hand from my vehicle/home, he refused at first, but eventually backed off. I asked for his badge number. He said that it would be on the citation.

Around this time, Deputy Fletcher pulled up and talked to Officer Hyson and myself to see what was going on. He chatted with us for a while until officer hyson finished with the citation. Al three of us were cited for criminal trespass 2.

All in all it could have been worse, but I feel like my rights have been disrespected. I was in the public park during daylight hours and yet was cited for trespassing. I believe we were profiled for having Florida plates, being homeless and exercising my right to verbally identify.

I intend to fight the citation in a trial by jury on August 1st, 2016 and none of the three of us can afford to pay the fines. This will likely turn into a warrant if not taken care of. Legal help would be appreciated.

This is not the first time the police have harrassed me for sleeping. Sleeping outside has been criminalized in many places and even where it’s acceptable to sleep, I have been woken up and told to identify myself. I’m tired of this criminal harassment and would Like to see some consequences for these bullies who have nothing better to do than harass the homeless for the crime of existing.

– Theodore Pojman

“Justice” For The Wealthy, Law Enforcement For The Poor

This post was written by  and originally published at the Center For a Stateless Society (C4SS) under the title “America’s Divided Justice System.” Posts and other content can be submitted to the CopBlock Network via the CopBlock.org Submission Page. (Note: This has been posted in its original form and no edits to the original text were made. Some links were added within the text.)

The post consists of a book review of “The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gapby Matt Taibbi. That book relates to what is effectively two different “justice” systems faced by the wealthy and the poor, minorities, and immigrants. The latter group is the target of enforcement policies such as “broken windows” and “zero tolerance” that emphasize cracking down on even the most minor of crimes, often times consisting of victimless crimes. In contrast, the former group benefits from policies that have come to be referred to as “too be to fail” or “too big to jail” that effectively allow fraud and other financial crimes when committed by wealthy people.

Obviously, the disparity between the ability of wealthy people and poor people to hire lawyers, expend time, and utilize personal connections within that system in order to fight any charges they may face exacerbate those differing experiences with the judicial system even further.

America’s Divided Justice System

The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap by Matt Taibbi (2014).

One does not often find it a pleasant surprise to receive unpleasant information, but this is a reaction many readers will get from Matt Taibbi’s 2014 book The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap. While the book has largely been billed as a piece on the evils of growing economic inequality in the US, a more accurate description would be that it documents the discrepancy in how the American legal system treats wealthy offenders as opposed to poor ones. Taibbi’s thesis is that America’s legal system lets the wealthy get away with massive injustices, while the poor, racial minorities and immigrants are faced with draconian punishments (not to mention nightmarish bureaucracy) for minor violations and even unsubstantiated allegations. The picture he paints is not a pleasant one, but the author’s storytelling ability and grasp of the subject matter make for a surprisingly enjoyable read.

The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap

Matt Taibbi is best known as a generally left-of-center columnist for Rolling Stone, for which he is arguably the star political writer. He has also written for The Nation, Playboy and New York Press as well as several books of his own. While Taibbi is clearly in the liberal or social democratic camp, The Divide offers much that is of interest to libertarians, especially where it criticizes the excesses of bureaucracy and the prosecution of victim-less crimes. Left libertarians especially will appreciate that the book strongly echoes their concerns that the state actively takes actions that make the poor even worse off. While Taibbi uses statistics to make his case, the real driving force of the book is his depictions of specific examples of injustices. In these anecdotes the human consequences of plutocracy are vividly illustrated.

Taibbi alternates between stories of white collar criminal activity going unpunished and mean-spirited state aggression leveled at poor people. This does well to illustrate Taibbi’s point that the rich and poor in America live in two different worlds when it comes to treatment by law enforcement. However it may be the book’s biggest weakness for some readers who will find the back and fourth changes in setting distracting. To his credit, Taibbi ultimately ties his narratives together, asserting that lax treatment for the rich and overly harsh punishment of the poor combine to form a dystopian reality.

Taibbi begins with Eric Holder, the Clinton administration official who would become Attorney General under Barack Obama. In the late nineties Holder authored a memo which made explicit the concept of “Collateral Consequences.” Holder argued that courts could consider the indirect negative economic consequences of subjecting large companies to legal penalties if a court ruled against them. This idea would later become known as “too big to fail” and by extension “too big to jail.”  Between his time with the Clinton and Obama administrations, Holder worked with Covington and Burling, a law firm that pioneered the use of “Collateral Consequences” to keep major companies from facing legal penalties. Taibbi largely credits the Clinton administration for passing laws which  exacerbated the disparity in legal punishment between the rich and the poor. Specifically he notes that Clinton’s presidency marked a time of agreement between democrats and republicans on “getting tough on crime,” specifically crime committed by poor people. leading to the escalated war on drugs and increased prison population (specifically the black prison population) during Clinton’s presidency. This was coupled with an increased leniency towards crimes committed in the financial sector. Taibbi claims it is no coincidence that Goldman Sachs was among the biggest contributors to both Bill Clinton’s and Barack Obama’s presidential campaigns (not to mention Hillary Clinton’s current campaign).

All of this occurred during a sharp decrease in overall crime, which continued through the 2000’s. Taibbi notes that as crime decreased police officers whose performance and promotion potential was evaluated on numbers of arrests were forced to chase increasingly pettier offenses. Police adopted a wide net strategy, comparable to fishing with dynamite, in which large numbers of ostensibly “suspicious” poor or working class people would be searched, arrested, ticketed, or issued summons for minor violations which they may or may not have committed. These offenders almost certainly did not have the time or money to fight the allegations in court. Arrests for marijuana and violations like “blocking pedestrian traffic” sky-rocketed. Taibbi discusses one instance where the accused chose to fight this particular allegation due to the fact that the supposed offense took place on a morning when there was no pedestrian traffic. His own defender and the judge had little knowledge of how to handle this as the entire system is set up to encourage guilty pleas for such offenses. In another instance cops accuse a young man of drawing graffiti in black ink with a pink highlighter. Unsurprisingly police cruelty, dishonesty and downright stupidity are often on full display in this book.

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Taibbi gives a great deal of attention to Howard Safir, the Giuliani-appointed New York Police Commissioner, who expanded the “Broken Windows” and “Zero Tolerance” policies of his more well known predecessor Bill Bratton, with an even greater focus on arresting and fining people for petty offenses. Under Safir, arrests for marijuana sky rocketed. Taibbi notes that the accused faced hours on end at court hearings, in which large numbers of cases are reviewed by judges who themselves would rather be anywhere else. The court appearances and other bureaucratic red tape often forced the accused to take time off from work or seek child care that they otherwise would not have to. Taibbi discusses many of the violations reviewed as “administrative crimes” which while technically illegal do not cause demonstrable harm to anyone. While crime with actual victims had gone down, police focused on violations of arbitrary statutes. Illegal immigration is one example. Taibbi relates this to occurrences of police setting up “drunk driving” checkpoints at the roads going in and out of immigrant neighborhoods during times when people would come and go to work. He notes that the increased deportations that occurred under the Obama administration enabled a massive kidnapping industry in Latin America, in which kidnappers would locate deportees while seeking ransoms from their remaining relatives in the US.

Elsewhere Taibbi discusses the collapse of Lehman Brothers and its secret backroom deal with the English firm Barclays that ripped off millions from smaller creditors around the world. This section is an excellent primer on the lead-up to the 2008 financial crisis. As is the chapter on JPMorgan Chase, which committed massive fraud involving fake credit card judgement. He notes that the business of collecting delinquent credit card debt itself relies on fraud, as it would be uneconomical for collection agencies to review the actual records of the alleged debtors. Often they instead employ “robo-signing” (the practice of having entry level staffers sign as many documents as possible, without actually reading them) and “gutter service” where a server may or may not deliver a summons to an accused who may or may not show up to contest the allegation. In all cases discussed, real people are genuinely harmed and the perpetrators are never given more than negligible fines. He also contrasts the treatment of crimes committed by HSBC (a firm that has worked with murderous drug cartels and Islamist terrorists) to the disproportionately worse treatment of small time drug users.

In one of the more interesting stories of the book, a gang of well-funded hedge fund managers attempt to bully the owner of a smaller insurance firm, Fairfax Financial Holdings, into going out of business through an elaborate campaign of harassment, threats, late-night phone calls, and phony accusations of a criminal activity. This may be of interest to libertarians looking for a starting point to a discussion of what forms of malicious activity do and do not violate the non-aggression principle. Similarly, Taibbi’s discussion of welfare recipients who largely forgo their right to freedom from government search and seizure without probable cause is a potential starting point for conversation. Such people are often subject to inspectors rooting through their underwear drawers and bathrooms looking for evidence of unreported income. While Taibbi’s sympathy for people on welfare may rub some mainstream libertarians the wrong way, he argues that regardless whether one opposes the welfare state or not, one should find this excessive, especially when such zeal for fraud prevention is not matched when it comes to white-collar criminals committing the same crimes on a larger scale.

Banner - Tunnel1Overall Taibbi finds that the poor are subject to bureaucracy while the rich are able to become bureaucracies in and of themselves by hiring lawyers capable of generating decades of red tape for anyone who makes any accusation against them. He feels that America has such love for and fear of people with power and money and disdain for those who lack it, that its people allow two divergent class-based legal systems to govern. The book is an engaging and often entertaining read that will likely find a sympathetic ear from anyone who values justice.

Jails and the “Justice” System Punish the Poor For Being Poor

This post was written by and originally published at the Center For a Stateless Society (C4SS) under the title “Prisons Don’t Bail Out the Poor.” Posts and other content can be submitted to the CopBlock Network via the CopBlock.org Submission Page. (Note: This has been posted in its original form and no edits to the original text were made. Some links were added within the text.)

This post relates to the exploitation of the poor and vulnerable members of society by law enforcement and the court system. Oftentimes, people of lower economic classes and especially minorities within that demographic end up in jail and/or prison simply because they don’t have the means to defend themselves from allegations made against them. This also makes it that much more likely innocent people will accept plea deals just to avoid serving more jail time while awaiting trial and/or to avoid the risk of more severe punishment should they lose.

A significant percentage of those “crimes” they are prosecuted for are victimless crimes in the first place and many are actually predicated on conditions created by poverty. In addition, minor crimes of that nature often lead to more harsh punishments for future transgressions by creating a long criminal record that is used to justify tougher sentences, even though that record consists of things more affluent people would never be arrested or prosecuted for. In many cases, building a criminal record based on such minor offenses is an intentional strategy used by law enforcement against the poor for that very reason.

Previous posts by Nick Ford that have been shared on CopBlock.org can be found here, here, here, and here. If you appreciate the things Nick has written, you can support him directly here.

Prisons Don’t Bail Out the Poor

The New York Times recently reported that on March 13th, Jeffery Pendleton was found dead in his jail cell. Pendleton was a homeless man who lived in New Hampshire and had been arrested on March 8th for outstanding fines and possession of small amounts of marijuana. His set bail of $100 was prohibitively costly for him and he was left to languish in his cell until trial, over a month later.

According to New Hampshire’s state experts, there were no sign of foul play.

Pendleton’s family disagrees, saying on a GoFundMe campaign that aims to bring Pendleton’s body home: “His body has been viewed by a second source and we have found that we were lied to by the medical examiner in New Hampshire as well as the jail. … The second report completed in Arkansas states there are clear indications that Jeffery was harmed prior to his death and likely that harmed caused his death.”

Pendleton’s death, whether a freak accident or something more, reflects a disturbing trend of individuals, particularly lower-income and people of color, dying in jail cells. Another high-profile victim, a black woman named Sandra Bland, died after only three days in jail in 2013. Her death was ruled a suicide but her family, like Pendleton’s, disagreed.

Prison Profits Poor PeopleIn practice, jails tend to work as places where lower-income people must be processed and held until they can be processed again. As Gilles Bissonnette, a director for the American Civil Liberties Union of New Hampshire said of Pendleton’s case, “at that point, he would have effectively served his sentence before he ever had an opportunity to contest the charge — an outcome that only a poor person would be confronted with.”

The issue of prohibitively high bail is serious enough that the Department of Justice (DoJ) released an official statement around the time of Pendleton’s death. Such statements don’t have the force of law, but they can influence shifts in policy by making the federal government’s position clear on a given issue.

At one point the statement says “[b]ail that is set without regard to defendants’ financial capacity can result in the incarceration of individuals not because they pose a threat to public safety or a flight risk, but rather because they cannot afford the assigned bail amount.”

As such, jails are often used as pre-detention centers that skirt around Constitutional requirements of “fair and equal treatment” under the law. If poor people are regularly locked up and have bail set without regard to their ability to pay then equality under the law seems like an unlikely outcome.

But even if we tried to make bail set partly on the basis of financial stability and well-being, this would not be enough. Whether it comes to police and civil forfeiture, the criminal justice system and plea deals, or the prison industrial complex, the state’s profit motive leads them to seek monopoly profits to the disadvantage of the accused and convicted.

As the New York Times notes, this report by the DoJ, “…echoes the conclusions of the Justice Department’s investigation of the Police Department and court in Ferguson, Mo. Investigators there concluded that the court was a moneymaking venture, not an independent branch of government.”

But “independence” is a meaningless term when the government has created and reinforced perverse incentives that treat individuals as a stream of revenue. Fixing that isn’t going to be accomplished by sending letters to courts and politely asking them to change. In fact, the way to affect change isn’t to ask nicely for the government to play by its own rules. We’ve been doing that for too long to no avail.

It’s time we made up our own rules and played by them ourselves in peaceful and creative ways. This means building alternative forms of dealing with crime that don’t rely on punishment being the focus of rehabilitation. It also means not treating money as the sole way that people can help atone for their offenses.

But of course, Pendleton didn’t do anything wrong.

Well, besides being poor.

Las Vegas Marshals Block Handicap Space; Make It Very Clear They Don’t Care About Disabled

LV Deputy Marshal Marcus DiazThis video and the description included in this post were submitted by members of Nevada Cop Block, who regularly attend Food Not Bombs Las Vegas Picnics to counteract and document the harassment that people participating in the twice weekly events often face from the employees of the Deputy City Marshals of Las Vegas and other Law Enforcement Departments, such as the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department.

Las Vegas Police have a long history of targeting homeless people, as well as those who attempt to aid them through non-government methods, such as Mutual Aid. In fact, in 2006 Las Vegas was one of the first cities in the country to make it illegal to share food with hungry people and several members of Food Not Bombs Las Vegas were either cited or arrested, as a result.

Las Vegas Deputy Marshal Marcus DiazThe ban on sharing food with hungry people was overturned fairly quickly, in large part because the law stated that people could not share food in public with “someone who appeared to qualify for government assistance” (I.E. people that look like they might actually need food). However, harassment toward homeless and impoverished people within the Las Vegas area continued in different ways and is still a very common occurrence today, both inside and outside of the local public parks.

As you can see in the video above, the Las Vegas Deputy City Marshals don’t even bother to hide their arrogance, hypocrisy, and disdain for the citizens of Las Vegas. Make sure you don’t forget to contact those within the Las Vegas City Government to let them know what you think of these marshals parking illegally blocking the handicapped parking space in a public park and then saying that that’s just “how it goes” if a disabled person comes along and needs to park.

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During a weekly Food Not Bombs picnic, Marshals working for the City of Las Vegas were observed being too lazy to spend an extra five seconds parking in an actual parking space at Huntridge Circle Park in Downtown Las Vegas. So, instead they double parked the wrong direction blocking access to the handicapped parking space in the process, even though there were six other spaces open at the time. (Something they would give anyone else a very expensive ticket for and that is a very legitimate issue in terms of the handicapped access area.)

When it was pointed out that they were not only parked illegally but were blocking the handicapped parking space, Deputy Marshal Marcus Diaz (driving vehicle number 3908) said, “I know, thanks.”

Later, Deputy Marshal Diaz stated, “that’s how it goes,” when asked what handicapped people were supposed to do if they came to the park and the space designated for them to park was blocked.

Vegas Deputy Marshal Marcus DiazThe other Las Vegas Marshal claimed he was there responding to a call about us being in danger and needed to park blocking the handicapped space in case he had to come rushing to our rescue. The fact that he never contacted us or said anything to us prior to us confronting him about their illegal and immoral parking proves that was a (bad) lie.

He also tried to claim that they weren’t obstructing the handicapped parking area, which as you can see in the video is an even worse lie.

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Date of Incident:July 27, 2015 – Approximately 12:42 PM
Location of Incident: “Huntridge Circle Park in Downtown Las Vegas
Department Involved: City of Las Vegas Deputy Marshals’ Office
Officers Involved: Deputy Marshal Marcus Diaz and one unidentified Deputy Marshal, who was driving vehicle #3885 at the time.

Contact Info:

Las-Vegas-Marshals-Illegally-Park-and-Block-Handicapped-Space-at-Circle-ParkDeputy City Marshals

Website: http://old.lasvegasnevada.gov//information/4170.htm
Address: 3300 Stewart Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Phone: (702) 229-6444, option 1
Fax: (702) 386-7070

City of Las Vegas Government

Website: http://www.lasvegasnevada.gov
City Hall Address: 495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Phone: (702) 229-6011
Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/CityOfLasVegas
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/cityoflasvegas
Instagram: http://www.lasvegasnevada.gov/images/instagram.png
Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/KCLVChannel2

City Manager Betsy Fretwell

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/betsy.fretwell
Twitter: https://twitter.com/betsyfretwell

Councilman Bob Coffin (Ward 3 Councilman, where Circle Park is located)

Email: Contact Councilman Bob Coffin
Phone: (702) 229-6405
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/bob.coffin.9
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Coffin4Council

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Deputy Marshal Marcus Diaz: “That’s how it goes.”

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Full, unedited raw video by four different members of Nevada Cop Block.

*UPDATE* “Justice for Africa” Protests – More Photos and Video from Los Angeles

LA Park 6**Note** This is an update to a previous post featuring photos and video from the “Justice for Africa” protests in Los Angeles over the killing of yet another unarmed person: This update includes additional photos and video from Jason Nellis, who blogs at “The World as seen by Jazoof” and has also been involved with Nevada Cop Block and other Las Vegas area groups

In addition, there are also photos from Ballentine, who is a member of the Sunset Activist Collective. As a member of the “Sunset 5,” Ballentine was one of those arrested by Las Vegas police in 2013 in retaliation for publicly exposing the murders and complete lack of accountability within the LVMPD, during Nevada Cop Block chalking protests.

Once again, if you personally have any video, photos, or experiences to share from the protests (or any previous incidents with the LAPD) you can share them via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. In addition, included at the bottom of this post is a list of California-area Cop Block groups that you could connect with if you want to promote police accountability in your area and help protect your neighbors from police violence.

Ballentine’s Photos of Chalk Messages at the LAPD Headquarters:

(Click for Full Size)

LAPD HQ Chalk13LAPD HQ Chalk10LAPD HQ Chalk7LAPD HQ Chalk8LAPD HQ Chalk9LAPD HQ Chalk11LAPD HQ Chalk12LAPD HQ Chalk14

Additional Photos by Jason Nellis:

LAPD HQ 12LAPD HQ 13

Additional Video by Jason Nellis:

Once again, any commentary included is via Jason Nellis’ posts and/or description on YouTube, unless it is in parenthesis.

“Whose Streets Our Streets – Uphill Africa March”

Another clip from the march

“LAPD March 3/3- How cops aggravated the situation
They knew he was mentally ill and the incident with the homeless woman was not violent. They aggravated the situation and brought it about.

“JusticeforAfrica- Recent Skid Row Killings by Cops
Other mentally ill and homeless people on skid row being murdered by police lately- from memorial rally 3/3

“Die-in at LAPD for Brother Africa and all victims”

“LAPD Protester Lissa Arrested- Friends ask why”
Lissa Bissa of the Anti-Media arrested when trying to walk into a public Police Commission meeting. I just missed the arrest. Cops refuse to answer questions. OK this is after the first arrest I missed. Lissa Bissa tried going into public police commission meeting. These are her two friends. They then got arrested between this and the next video. Again I missed that, and almost all media was gone, but Adam Kokesh got what happened to this girl after this on tape.

“3 Arrested at LAPD HQ, 19 year-old girl roughed up
When I returned from charging for more video… the two girls arrested, one attacked by 5 cops whom I saw leave carrying riot gear… leaving only Amari Shakur.

“LAPD Protesters speak truth and MSM people flip”

“Inside LAPD HQ Sgt. Graham”

“LAPD Detention Center – Search for kidnapped girls”

“LAPD Detention- Search for kidnapped girls (audio only)
Since I was told to put the camera away.

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Hilarious Signs Prank Leads to Unfunny Police Harassment (Video)

Need Wasabi - Sign PrankRecently, I came across this video while I was doing important research on police accountability issues wasting time on the internets. The original video, which can also be seen below, features Greg Benson (a middle aged guy who likes to have fun, but isn’t quite as funny as Ed Bassmaster) of “Mediocre Films” holding up silly signs on the side of a freeway off ramp, proclaiming such things as, “Ain’t No Skank (referring to himself), Free Cardboard, Penis (for no reason), Need Change for a Hundred, Will Work for $150k/Year Plus Medical and Dental,” among others. As advertised in the title, it is actually quite funny right up until the point where a cop shows up and issues Greg and Matt Orf, who is filming at the time, $400 worth of tickets for “trespassing on the freeway.”

It’s rather obvious in the first video embedded below, which is a sort of “behind the scenes” version of the prank video, that the California Highway Patrol trooper who stops them and issues the tickets is basing them on ridiculous and possibly false pretenses. First, he tells them they are trespassing because they aren’t allowed “on the freeway.” At best, that is a technicality, since they are at the off ramp, not the actual freeway. As proof, he points to a sign on the other side of the road, which is obviously intended to keep people from walking up the on ramp and onto the freeway, and then a “wrong way” sign that even more obviously is intended to keep cars from driving the wrong way up the off ramp (when that is pointed out by Greg, he replies, “it is a sign”).

He also states, “we like to stick ’em them in jail, too,” when Greg explains that they often see homeless people I ALMOST GOT ARRESTEDpanhandling there. That’s not exactly shocking, since it is rare when police miss an opportunity to harass, arrest, or abuse (and even kill) the homeless. Bullies like easy targets and homeless people rarely have lawyers representing them or any resources to fight back with. More often than not, they are willing to plead down to get out of jail as quickly as possible, rather than taking bogus harassment tickets to court. In fact, as is the case with Greg and Matt, most people in general will just accept these sort of tickets and pay them without really even looking into the true legalities involved. Unfortunately, that easy source of revenue is somewhat of a self-perpetuating cycle, which makes cops more likely to issue tickets like these for the easy money they represent. That’s why you should always know your rights and film the police.

“I ALMOST GOT ARRESTED” (Behind the Scenes Video)

Hilarious Signs Prank (Busted by COPS!)

ORF SIGNS (Prank BUSTED by the COPS!!!)” (This is Matt Orf’s version of the “Sign Prank,” which I don’t personally think is as funny, but who am I to judge.)

This is “Signs” by Tesla, just because it’s kind of a cool song.

More From “Mediocre Films”

MAIN CHANNEL: http://youtube.com/MediocreFilms
2nd CHANNEL: http://youtube.com/mediocrefilms2
YESHMIN CHANNEL: http://youtube.com/YESHMIN
WEBSITE: http://www.mediocrefilms.com
GOOGLE+: http://gplus.to/gcb
FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/mediocrefilms
TWITTER: http://twitter.com/mediocrefilms
ASK GREG QUESTIONS: http://VYou.com/gregbenson

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“Justice for Africa” – Photos and Video from LAPD Shooting Protest

Jason Nellis Arrival in Los AngelesCurrently, Jason Nellis, who blogs at “The World as seen by Jazoof” and has also been involved with Nevada Cop Block and other Las Vegas area groups, is in Los Angeles, where protests over the shooting of an unarmed homeless man by the Los Angeles Police are taking place at the LAPD headquarters. These are photos and videos he has taken there. We should have an update with commentary and more details at some point later. (This is a cross-post from CopBlock.org)

If you personally have any video, photos, or experiences to share from the protests (or any previous incidents with the LAPD) you can share them via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. In addition, included at the bottom of this post is a list of California-area Cop Block groups that you could connect with if you want to promote police accountability in your area and help protect your neighbors from police violence.

As you can see in the screenshot included, this latest shooting of an unarmed person by the LAPD is not going unnoticed by the people in the city (Or elsewhere as a matter of fact.):

“As soon as I got to Union Station people around me were playing the video repeatedly. This is kinda surreal.”

Note: Any commentary included with the photos comes from the description included with them by Jason, unless in parenthesis.

Photos:

(CLICK FOR FULL SIZE)

Start of “Justice for Africa” protest rally point then March to LAPD to demand prosecutions of killer cops:
vigil1vigil2vigil3vigil4vigil5vigil6vigil7

Marching to LAPD (Police Set Up a “Bike Line” to Try and Stop March):

March1March2March3March5March4March6March7

At the LAPD’s door:

LAPD HQLAPD HQ2LAPD HQ3LAPD HQ 6LAPD HQ 7LAPD HQ 8LAPD HQ 9LAPD HQ 10LAPD HQ 11

(Chalk Messages at the LAPD Headquarters Protests):

LAPD HQ Chalk1LAPD HQ Chalk2LAPD HQ Chalk3LAPD HQ Chalk4LAPD HQ Chalk5LAPD HQ Chalk6

They taped up the way we came in… but the park side is nice and open… they say we can’t bring cameras in… we’ll see:

LA Park 1LA Park 2LA Park 3LA Park 4LA Park 5LA Park 6LA Park 7

Guess who the native on the crazy trip (Jason) walked up to: (Spoiler: Adam Kokesh)

FUCK, both times I rushed to the nearest outlet to charge my stuff in order to hurry back and record more, girls were arrested. This time the two female friends who I interviewed in a video, after the first one Lissa Bissa who is in earlier videos. One of the last two got taken down and manhandled by 5 cops (I believe in riot gear, they carried it out and can be vaguely seen in this quick shot I got).

LAPD Arrest

Video:

Arrival at “Justice for Africa” Protest

March to LAPD – Bike Cops

“Justice for Africa” Protest – at LAPD HQ


Taped in on one side at LAPD

Additional Resources:

CopBlock Groups Page: Connect with others in your area or start a group/chapter.
Know Your Rights Page: Get tips, tactics and knowledge to help yourself during a police interaction.
CopBlock Network: Support the great folks who make CopBlock.org possible by contributing $1/month to our efforts.
Official CopBlock Press Passes: Personalized press passes created by Nevada Cop Block.

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