Tag Archives: good cops

Yes, All Cops ARE Bastards; How and Why Modern Policing Discourages Moral Responsibility

ACAB All Cops Are Bastards Police Violence Corruption

The “Thin Blue Line,” that even “Good Cops” abide by almost without exception, not only protects “Bad Apples,” but also enables and even incentivizes police corruption and violence.

Note: This post was shared with Nevada Cop Block via reader submission. It was originally posted at JohnLaurits.com, entitled, “All Cops Are Bad: How Modern Policing Negates Moral Responsibility” and has been posted as it was originally published by Laurits. (Some links to relevant content on NVCopBlock have been added within the original text.)

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All Cops Are Bad: How Modern Policing Negates Moral Responsibility

Anyone following the news is probably aware that body-cam footage of Daniel Shaver’s murder was released earlier in December right after the officer who murdered him walked away with no conviction. A day after the video’s release, Oklahoma prosecutors chose not to file any charges after a deaf man walking with his cane was killed when police fired a taser and five bullets into his chest, pelvis, and arms after he failed to hear them shouting at him. Also during the same week, an 11-year-old black girl was held at gunpoint, hand-cuffed, and stuffed into the back of a police cruiser by officers who were searching for a middle-age, white, female suspect in Michigan. Meanwhile, an unarmed person was being shot to death in San Francisco by a rookie cop on his 4th day. As this post is written, US police have killed 1,132 human beings in 2017 so far and yet — in spite of this ongoing state-sponsored terror — questioning the integrity or usefulness of police institutions is still somehow seen as a pretty extremist thing to do.

There are a lot of very good reasons, however, that no one has ever written a song called Fuck Tha Fire Department

History & Origins of the Police:
A Tale of Two Law Enforcement Paradigms

Daniel Shaver Murder Philip Brailsford

Daniel Shaver and the cop who got away with murdering him

The police — or, more specifically, the policing institutions that exist today — are younger than most people imagine. The type of policing that exists today first emerged in France during the 1700s and the earliest use of “police officer” only appears in the USA in 1794, while the first known use of “police station” is from 1817. Just 200 years ago. The concept of policing has existed for a long time, of course — but these cops are something else…

Traditional Concepts of Policing:
Watchmen & Community Self-Policing

Long before the police institutions of today were established, policing was mostly a grassroots enterprise. In pre-industrial Europe, the law was usually enforced by volunteer watchmen who formed local groups known as the night watch or simply the watch. With the exception of large cities ( which is where empires, such as Rome, liked to keep their armies ), most towns and communities did not expect government authorities to deal with everyday criminal activity — so people did it themselves. While a lack of official oversight meant watch-groups could be prone to corruption, the fact that similar groups appear all over world-history shows that self-policing at the local level is a viable model that can spring up spontaneously in human society.

Private Security & Mercenary Forces

In cities with greater levels of crime, the watch might be assisted by inspectors or constables employed by the city’s authorities to protect commerce and help with more serious crimes. Merchants and traders who had a lot of valuable goods typically hired private security guards to protect their wares. Even with the watch and a city official on duty, businesses did not expect the government to take responsibility for guarding their interests — it was, after all, their business.

The Modern Police Department:
A Government Takeover of Policing

acab history police riot gear militarization ftp

1850 Historical Poster No Police Aberystwyth Boys Community PatrolsThen, the police changed in a big way. As the feudal power-structures of Europe broke down beneath a wave of revolutions in the 18th century, governments took a more active role in law enforcement and the first centralized policing organization was created in France by King Louis XIV. The duties of the new police were bluntly described as a mechanism of class-control over workers and peasants:

“ensuring the peace and quiet of the public and of private individuals, purging the city of what may cause disturbances, procuring abundance, and having each and everyone live according to their station and their duties

While France’s Gendarmes were seen as a symbol of oppression in other parts of Europe, the French policing model spread during the early 1800s as Napoleon Bonaparte conquered much of the continent. By the mid-1800s, modern policing institutions — publicly-funded, centralized police organized in a military hierarchy and under the control of the state — had been transplanted everywhere from Tsarist Russia to England and the United States.

Power, Paramilitary,
& Political Policing

plantation police slave patrols history of US copsPolicing became the exclusive right of governments as other law enforcement groups were absorbed into new and “official” institutions. The new police were not just tasked with serving the public, however — they also protected the political power of their new employers. It was a revolutionary era and the new police were shaped by rulers facing a particularly mutinous  population. The use of police as the vanguard of state-power was a major development and it was adapted to repress popular movements all over the world. Early police organizations in the US, for example, pretty much handed blue uniforms to former slave-patrols and anti-union mercenaries who had historically protected the interests of plantation-bosses in the South and industrial capitalists in the North.

( For more on the historical links between slavery, anti-union security, and law enforcement, read “Private Property Is the Police-State” )

The Problem of Modern Policing:
The Negation of Moral Responsibility

This was a fundamental shift — police were no longer organized as a response to the needs of communities but as an instrument of state-authority. With government officials deciding the scope and extent of policing practices, watchmen became employees of the government and ordinary citizens no longer had any control over the police. A watchmen’s authority could be challenged if they pissed off too many peasants because it was the peasants who organized the patrol to begin with — the authority of the state, however, is trickier to challenge.

FTP Don't Trust Cops Sesame Street Big Bird

Today, the police are a military hierarchy organized in a chain of command of captains, sergeants, etc — patrols do whatever their superior officers’ say, those officers do whatever their superiors say, and so on into the bureaucratic abyss. To be part of the police, officers must obey orders, just as the members in any military must. Since failing to obey orders is a pretty quick and reliable way to leave a police force, cops who disobey orders are pretty rare ( and only employed as officers very briefly ).

Because of this, cops lack what philosophers call moral agency.

Moral Agency & Diffusion of Responsibility

Good Cops Ignoring the Violence Corruption of Bad ApplesMoral agency is the ability to know whether an action is right or wrong. For example, if a bear kills a person, there is no moral issue because that’s just how bears operate but, if a person kills a person, they need to hire a lawyer because people typically have more options than bears do, which means they can be held responsible for their actions. Murder is not just killing — murder is having a choice not to kill and killing anyway. Without moral agency, there is no murder. In fact, the whole idea of “justice” assumes that moral agency exists, which is why most legal systems do not prosecute kids or folks with certain mental illnesses — if someone lacks the ability to do the right thing, it is pointless to punish them for not doing it.

Modern policing deprives cops of moral agency at a structural level. With a militaristic chain of command as the institutional core, moral responsibility for the actions of individual officers is transferred to the abstract spook of governmental authority. The result is that nobody can be held responsible and the officer becomes an inanimate tool in the spooky hand of an unseen and unaccountable bureaucracy — the police officer becomes no more than a vessel for policies, totally devoid of agency and free of its consequences.

And without agency, there can be no accountability. There can be no justice.

Why All Cops Are Bad
( Yes, Every Last One)

ACAB All Cats Are Beautiful All Cops Are BastardsIf you are stopped by a cop, then A.C.A.B. means ‘All Cats Are Beautiful’ — but, in any other situation, A.C.A.B. stands for All Cops Are Bad or All Coppers Are Bastards, depending on how edgy you wanna be. There is extreme social pressure from all sides to support the boys in blue ( as the Ninja Turtles call them) and criticism of the police is supposed to be followed by reassurances that “most cops are good” or that “it’s just a few bad apples.” But all of that sidesteps the actual problem, which is a structural problem. The fact that 3.3% of all injuries treated in US emergency rooms are inflicted by police is not because some cops are unpleasant people — it is because the institutions are structured to shield officers from being held responsible for their actions as individuals.

All cops are bad because no cop has moral agency. They might be a good parent or a good friend or even a good saxophonist — but they are not a good cop. Without agency, moral responsibility is negated and the result is that nobody is responsible for executing Daniel Shaver on his knees as he pleaded for his life. Nobody is responsible for Philando Castille being shot to death in front of his partner and her child and nobody is responsible for firing the bullets that extinguished the life of a 12 year-old black child named Tamir Rice as he played in the park.

Fuck the Police” Is a Moral Statement

Cops Beating People with Batons Police BrutalityAs the first paragraph of this post was written, 1,132 human beings had been slaughtered by US police so far in 2017 — as its last paragraphs are written, that number has grown to 1,142.  And it will grow more by the time most of you read this. (Note: It’s now up to 1,147, as of the time this was cross-posted on Dec. 20th. – Less than one day later.) Instances of particularly despicable police violence, such as the execution of Daniel Shaver, sometimes force their way onto the newsreel — but the vast majority who are killed by police simply slip into the oblivion beneath the headlines. There are not enough hours each day to report on that much suffering.

And none of this is going to change, either — not until more of us have had enough. Not until our courage to speak out against the police is greater than the social and political pressure to deny that the problem exists. Not until more of us are more offended by cops shooting kids than by someone saying “fuck the police.” Fuck the institution of policing. Fuck the structural mechanisms that rob police of their humanity as much as they rob our mothers of their children. And even if your brother-in-law or [insert family-member or relative here] is a really nice person — when they wear that badge — fuck them, too.

In solidarity,
John Laurits

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Update: Half Naked, Drunk Texas Cop Who Fired Gun at Church Let Off With Probation

Deputy William Cox Texas Cop Naked Church Shooting Probation

Somervell County Sheriff’s Deputy William Cox was sentenced to just probation after getting drunk and shooting at a Texas Church.

In August of 2016 I posted about an off-duty Somervell County Sheriff’s Deputy who got sloppy drunk, stripped off most of his clothes and then drove over to a church in Ellis County, Texas and started shooting his gun into it.

Once local police arrived, former Deputy William Lane Cox readily admitted that he was drunk and had fired his gun(s) at the church, hitting the building several times. His confession, recorded on those officer’s body cams, included his admission that he had gotten drunk and decided to “blow off some steam” by shooting up the church, which was located within a residential neighborhood.

He also indicated that the reason for his “stress” was the shooting of several Dallas police officers in an incident that happened just prior to his own shooting spree. Among other racist comments Deputy Cox stated, “cause my boys are getting killed in Dallas” and “the black coon start killing my boys” on the video (embedded below).

Not surprisingly, after his initial arrest Deputy Cox received the typical Policeman’s Discount. The next day he was released without bail and shortly after that it was determined that he would not be facing any charges at all. That was partly due to the fact that the pastor of the church (who also just happens to be a police chaplain) didn’t want to press charges for the property damage caused by several bullets that had penetrated the doors and wall of the church.

Patrick Wilson Ellis County District Attorney Church Statement FavoritismHowever, there are numerous other charges that the police could easily have charged Deputy Cox with based on his own confession and the dangerous nature of his actions. Instead, while he was fired by the Somervell County Sheriff’s Office, Johnny Brown the Sheriff in Ellis County was pretty comfortable with not charging someone who admittedly drove drunk, recklessly discharged a gun while intoxicated, and put innocent people in danger by doing so at a building within a residential neighborhood with any crime whatsoever.

It wasn’t until six months later that Ellis County District Attorney Patrick Wilson launched a separate investigation and eventually charged him with “deadly conduct,” a class three felony. In doing so, Wilson stated the obvious: “it is very, very difficult for me to believe that this man, Mr. Cox, was not afforded some special consideration.

One would tend to think that any special consideration would end. However, as is always the case with police facing trial, that was far from true. In spite of facing a charge where the minimum sentence mandated by law is a two year prison sentence and the added circumstances of having been drinking (and driving) at the time, he still was offered a cushy plea deal based on him having been a “good citizen” prior to his drunken shooting spree. After pleading guilty, Cox was sentenced to just five years of probation a $1,500 fine and ten days in jail. BTW, he gets to serve those ten days on weekends, cuz you it would be a shame if he was inconvenienced.

Once again, I’m sure the average citizen would have gotten the same sort of treatment.

Burrito Thief Rehired to Tucson Police Dept. by Arizona Peace Officer Standards and Training Board

Last year, Officer Jose Olivares of the Tucson Police Department was fired after he was caught stealing a burrito from a local Mexican food restaurant the previous October. While the “Great Burrito Heist of 2015” isn’t exactly the crime of the century, it’s certainly something people that are paid to arrest other people for stealing stuff shouldn’t be doing themselves. So, he was fired from that position.

However, last week it was announced that the feel good story of 2016, where an internal investigation actually resulted in the Good Cops holding a Bad Apple accountable for his actions, has hit a snag. After an appeal, the Arizona Peace Officer Standards and Training Board has reinstated Officer Olivares and ruled that the firing was too harsh of a punishment. Instead he was retroactively suspended for 80 days and had his law enforcement certification suspended for three weeks, once again retroactively.

Via Tucson.com:

The Arizona Peace Officer Standards and Training Board accepted an agreement with Jose Olivares on Wednesday, and issued a retroactive suspension of his state certification, according to AZPOST documents.

Olivares was fired from the Tucson Police Department last February after he failed to pay for a burrito during an October 2015 visit to Viva Burrito, according to AZPOST documents.

The day after the incident, one of Viva Burrito’s employees told a police lieutenant what had happened, leading to a department investigation.

Olivares told investigators he forgot to pay, but security footage from the restaurant showed him reaching toward his pocket at least four different times, but never producing any payment, AZPOST documents show.

The investigation determined Olivares committed theft while in uniform and on duty, and he was fired.
Olivares appealed his termination with the city’s Civil Service Commission, which ruled there wasn’t just cause for the type of discipline imposed.

He was reinstated to the department after serving an 80-hour suspension, city records show.

His suspension with AZPOST was considered served between Feb. 26 and March 16, 2016, according to AZPOST documents.

All of which, of course, means that he is eligible for back pay for all the time he missed during his initial firing. So, in essence he got a one year paid vacation as “punishment” for stealing something that he easily could have paid for if he had wanted to. That’ll show ’em!

Cleveland Cop Who Previously Shot Unarmed Man, Allowed To Attend Rehab Instead Of Jail After Drug Arrest

A member of the Cleveland Police Gang Unit, who was involved in a 2015 shooting of an unarmed man that the department initially lied about, was later himself busted for drugs. However, instead of going to jail, he’s been given a deal that will allow him to go to rehab instead of having his guilty plea count as a conviction.

In the shooting, for which a lawsuit is set to go to trial soon, Detective Jon Periandri claimed that the man he shot during a drug bust, Joevon Dawson, had gotten out of a car with a gun in his hand. The other five Good Cops at the scene backed up his story and one of them also moved a bullet casing to support the claim. Even Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams got in on the act, making a statement to the press at the scene that Dawson was armed when he was shot.

However, information later released as part of the lawsuit indicated that the only gun recovered at the scene had been stored within the center console area on the inside of the vehicle. Investigators from the Ohio Attorney General’s Office Bureau of Criminal Investigation concluded that the gun could not have been used by Dawson.

Meanwhile, even as he was in the process of arresting and shooting people for drug crimes he was simultaneously buying drugs by the handful. In fact, evidence showed that he literally ordered drugs while on duty as part of the narcotics squad. Incidentally, his taste for prescription pain killers and heroin were uncovered after a drug bust that included the Brooklyn, Ohio Law Director and the son of the mayor of Parma, Ohio.

Via Cleveland.com:

Periandri would soon face criminal investigation for another incident that happened in the weeks before and after the shooting.

In October 2015, as investigators continued probing the Dawson shooting, local and federal authorities raided the Seven Hills home of Alfonso Yunis, a suspected drug dealer.

Police found Yunis counting and crushing pills at his house along with then-Brooklyn law director Scott Clausen and attorney Brian Byrne, son of Parma Mayor Mike Byrne.

All three were arrested. A subsequent tip from a confidential police informant and a search of Yunis’ cellphone turned up hundreds of text messages with a number that was later traced to Periandri, according to court records.

The messages appeared to be “criminal in nature” and showed Periandri, a detective in charge of investigating and arresting drug dealers, repeatedly requesting to buy prescription painkillers and heroin off of Yunis, and even agreeing to act as a middleman for some drug deals, according to a search warrant affidavit obtained by cleveland.com in December 2015.

Dawson’s attorney entered the affidavit as evidence in the federal lawsuit on Thursday.

Messages seized from May 23, 2015 showed that Periandri ordered drugs while he working during protests in Cleveland that followed the acquittal of Cleveland police officer Michael Brelo on manslaughter charges in the 2012 killing of an unarmed couple. He also used a shorthand for what the affidavit describes as a racial slur to describe the protesters.

Cleveland police’s internal affairs unit launched an investigation and, that same month, obtained a warrant to collect a hair sample from Periandri and have it tested for drugs.

But before they could execute the warrant, Periandri took a medical leave of absence and checked himself into a drug rehabilitation center in California, internal investigators wrote in the affidavit.

The deal

A May 13, 2016 email between from Cleveland police commander Brian Heffernan to Williams, the head of internal affairs Lt. Monroe Goins and another Cleveland police officer indicated that Periandri was in talks with Assistant Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Jim Gutierrez.

The two agreed that Periandri would be charged by information and plead guilty to a felony drug possession charge at a June 7 court hearing. He would receive treatment in lieu of conviction, the email says.

Periandri would then serve a year’s probation, and the charge would be dropped from his record if he successfully completed treatment. In exchange, Periandri agreed to give up his certification to be a police officer.

But that court hearing never happened.

Prosecutors did not charge Periandri until Thursday, more than eight months after the original offer, according to court records. And the information was not delivered to the clerk’s office until about 1:30 p.m. Monday, after reporters began asking the prosecutor’s office about Periandri’s case.

The information, signed by Gutierrez, Periandri and Periandri’s attorney, Robert Dixon, is stamped Jan. 19. A note stuck on the outside of Periandri’s file says the information was “back-dated” to Jan. 19.

Kathleen Caffrey, a spokeswoman for the prosecutor’s office, said on Monday that Periandri had been charged by information and pleaded guilty in June.

After a reporter asked for a copy of the information and more information about the court hearing on Tuesday, she called to say that she had misinterpreted a conversation with Gutierrez and that no June agreement was reached.

Periandri was allowed to retire from the department for medical reasons on Aug. 9, 2016, Williams said.

Also, when reporters began asking about the drug “conviction” as a result of discovery information from the lawsuit, a spokesman for the prosecutor’s office explained that the records of it had never been entered into the Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court’s public docket due to an “IT issue.” #SeemsLegit

Drunk Off-Duty Cincinnati Cop Causes Panic by Dropping Her Gun While Harassing People in a Movie Theater

Sergeant Shauna Lambert of the Cincinnati Police Department was arrested last week after she showed up at a movie theater in Milford, began acting weird and harassing people, then dropped her department issued 9mm handgun. She was off-duty and drunk at the time.

Reportedly, her behavior included standing up several times during the movie and physically grabbing at least two other patrons, who attempted to move to another area to avoid her. Lambert responded by moving back toward where they were sitting, which is when she dropped the gun. There are conflicting accounts of whether she was attempting to pull the gun out at the time that it fell to the floor.

People within the theater began running out once they saw that it was a gun she had dropped, prompting an evacuation of the building. Others held her down on the floor of the theater, while one man picked up the gun and removed it from the building. She was then arrested, while still sitting within the theater. (See videos embedded below.)

It’s also been revealed since this incident that this isn’t her first drunken, armed rodeo. In fact, she’s now been arrested twice within the past nine months for alcohol related offenses. Back in April of last year, Sgt. Lambert was arrested for driving drunk in Blue Ash, when she was caught speeding and driving over the median then refused to perform a field sobriety test or take a breathalyzer.

Via WLWT5.com (the local NBC affiliate):

Shauna Lambert, a 23-year veteran of the Cincinnati Police Department, was arrested in Milford on Friday.

Witnesses told police Lambert had dropped a gun onto the floor of a movie theater during a showing of “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.”

No bullets were discharged, and no one was hurt, but Lambert was charged with having a gun while intoxicated and inducing panic.

It’s the second blemish on her record in nine months.

On April 29, Lambert was charged with operating a vehicle under the influence after Blue Ash police Officer Jason Asbury noticed her car speeding across a median on State Route 126.

Officer Asbury tried to perform a sobriety test on Lambert, but the test ended abruptly when Lambert was asked to walk in a straight line.

TRANSCRIPT OF DASH CAM VIDEO

Officer Asbury: “Then take nine more steps back, OK? One, two, three, all the way until you get to nine.”
Lambert: “You want to do this?”
Officer Asbury: “You understand everything so far?”
Lambert: “Do you want to do this?”
Officer Asbury: “Yeah, do you want to do this? I’m asking you. Are you going to perform these tests?”
Lambert: (inaudible)
Officer Asbury: “You’re not going to perform these tests? OK, ma’am. Turn around and face the car.”

Lambert refused to take a Breathalyzer test and pleaded guilty a few weeks later to an amended charge of reckless operation of a vehicle.

In spite of having pled guilty to that previous (conveniently “amended”) case and having a total of seven on-duty auto accidents (I’m thinking the same thing), Sgt. Lambert was kept on the payroll by the Good Cops within the Cincinnati Police Department, even though she still lost her license as a result.

In addition, although her personnel records contain glowing praise of her “strong sense of right and wrong” and willingness to impose that on others, as well as her exceptional standard of decision making by her supervisors, it also shows a history of citizen complaints filed against her, including one for “sustained discourtesy.”

Ohio Deputy Arrested Driving Drunk for Third Time Since He Became a Cop After Causing Accident

On Christmas Eve, Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Deputy David Miller was arrested for driving drunk after he caused a multiple car accident. The real kicker to this story is that this is reportedly Deputy Miller’s third DWI offense, all of which occurred during the time he has been heroically serving as a cop. Miller, whose job is actually driving prisoners around town, was also carrying his department issued firearm in his vehicle at the time he was stopped.

BTW, the reason I said “reportedly” his third arrest is because he was also convicted of “failure to control” for “driving on sidewalks/street lawns/curbs.” Call me a skeptic, but I guarantee you that means this is really his fourth drunk driving incident. It’s just that during the last one the Good Cops that stopped him (on someone’s lawn) decided to leave part of that story out. (It would be interesting to know how many times they just let him go altogether.)

Via NewsNet5.com, the Cleveland ABC affiliate:

A Cuyahoga County sheriff’s deputy is facing several charges including operating a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or drugs (OVI) after he caused a two-car accident Saturday night, according to North Olmsted police.

No one was injured.

The deputy, David Miller, a North Olmsted resident, was arraigned in Rocky River municipal court Tuesday and pled not guilty. North Olmsted police said he has three prior OVI arrests. Of those, court records indicate Miller has two prior OVI convictions, one out of Elyria in 2007 and one out of Westlake in 1994. Records also show he was found guilty of failure to control and driving on sidewalks/street lawns/curbs in Westlake in 2013.

A spokeswoman for the Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Department said Miller was hired in 1997. He started as a county corrections officer in 1993. As a deputy, the spokeswoman said he is responsible for transporting prisoners.

North Olmsted police said Miller is also charged with refusing to take a breathalyzer test and passing in a no-passing zone. Saturday’s incident happened on Gessner Road near Lorain Road at about 5:40 pm.

At the time of Miller’s latest arrest, police said he had his county-issued firearm in his personal vehicle. The city prosecutor will determine if there will be any additional charges.

Miller is on unpaid administrative leave pending the outcome of an internal investigation.

Personally, I can’t wait to see how that investigation pans out. Perhaps, four five times will be the charm…

Update: News 5 Cleveland is now stating that Deputy Miller was convicted of yet another DWI prior to being hired. (See the video below for details.)

Not a Happy Meal: Drunk, Impatient U.S. Marshal Pulled Gun on McDonald’s Cashier and Customers

Deputy U.S. Marshal Charles Brown had the drunken munchies and just couldn’t be bothered to wait in line like some sort of mortal. So the off-duty Hero began yelling and complaining at a Brooklyn McDonald’s about how long it was taking for him to get his Un-Happy Meal. When that didn’t speed things up sufficiently, Brown pulled out his gun; first pointing it at the cashier, then at customers in the line behind him who had voiced supported for the cashier.  That apparently did the trick and soon after Deputy Marshal Brown paid for his food (because stealing is wrong) and was on his drunken way.

Meanwhile, other employees within the Mickey-D’s were in the process of calling 911 during his quick draw demo. Not long after, Brown was caught a few blocks away by NYPD officers with his loaded service pistol in his waistband and arrested on “a slew of charges, including menacing, harassment and violating firearm license regulations.”

The reactions to all this were apparently somewhat mixed. As would be expected, cashier Joanna Diaz was shook up a bit and, according to unnamed co-workers, didn’t show up the next day for her scheduled shift. Meanwhile, a customer named Heather Polamis and who is described as a “shocked receptionist” is rethinking her dining options and is quoted as saying, ““You can’t go anywhere today without something happening.”

However, another customer seems to be a little more accepting of Deputy Marshal Brown’s dinner rush, because she’s read a lot of Fake News stories about how stressful and dangerous having to wait for your food like everyone else can be for Good Cops. “Margaret Johnson, said she suspected that the munchie-motivated man simply ‘snapped.’ – ‘[U.S. Marshals] are under a lot of pressure,’ the 74-year-old said. ‘They’re under a lot of stress. They risk their lives every day.'”

Note: There seems to be two slightly different versions of this story being reported. Via the Daily Mail:

Another report by NBC New York, however, states that Brown is accused of getting into an argument with a 25-year-old male employee.

Brown then left and came back with a black gun, threatening the employee from outside, police said according to the network.

In the second version, Brown also left the store without any food. Regardless, Deputy Marshal Brown will reportedly need to find a new midnight snack destination now. A Brooklyn Criminal Court judge issued an order of protection against him on behalf of the McDonald’s and the cashier during his initial court appearance. He was, of course, released without bail, though.

P.S. – Yes, you did read that correctly. The U.S. Marshal’s name is in fact Charlie Brown, which makes this clown on clown violence. (You saw what I did there.)

Rikers Island Guard Kept Framed Newspaper Story About Inmate He Murdered in His Bedroom

Correction Officer Brian Coll was so proud of himself after he beat a man to death in 2012 that he kept a framed newspaper article about the murder in his bedroom. The guard at Rikers Island is currently on trial for repeatedly kicking inmate Ronald Spear in the head as Correction Officers Anthony Torres and Byron Taylor held him down. The beating resulted in severe head trauma and caused Spear to suffer a fatal heart attack shortly afterward.

Spear was suffering from end stage renal failure and required daily dialysis. He also had to walk with a cane due to his disability. Officer Coll had prevented Spear from seeing the doctor within the infirmary. This led to a argument between the two during which Coll began assaulting Spear. After punching him several times in the face and stomach Coll began kicking Spear like a “field goal kicker” while the other two guards held him down. At the same time he taunted Spear, yelling for him to “remember who had done that to him.”

His victim didn’t end up having long to remember the vicious assault since he died soon after. In order to cover for Coll, he and the other guards wrote false reports stating that Spear was the aggressor. Officer Torres later received a $10,000 workman’s comp settlement for injuries he suffered while holding Spear down. Torres and Officer Taylor have both since pled guilty to obstruction of justice charges and are testifying against Coll as part of a plea deal.

Officer Coll is facing charges of obstruction and “death resulting from deprivation of rights under color of law.” The latter charge carries a potential life sentence. (Although, I wouldn’t hold your breath on that.) It was during his arrest that the framed news article was discovered displayed in his bedroom as if to commemorate his murderous deed.

Via the New York Daily News:

“Let’s call it what it is: a trophy,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Brooke Cucinella said in her closing argument against Correction Officer Brian Coll.

Prosecutors say Coll repeatedly kicked Ronald Spear in the head and the resulting brain injury he suffered led to a fatal heart attack.

“Brian Coll killed Ronald Spear,” Cucinella told the Manhattan Federal Court jury. “Brian Coll killed Ronald Spear as he lay sick and exhausted, face down on the cold tile floor in the infirmary on Rikers Island.”

In her nearly hourlong argument, Cucinella described Spear’s final moments on Dec. 19, 2012, as terrifying — filled with pain as his life slipped away.

The inmate — who got into an argument with the former correction officer after Coll allegedly denied him a doctor — felt each of the “field goal”-like kick (sic) while groaning.

The death blows were accompanied by taunting, according to Cucinella.

“The last hateful words that Ronald Spear would ever hear — ‘This is what you get for f—ing with me, remember I did this’” she said Coll told the victim.

Cucinella also showed the jury autopsy photos of Spear’s skull with the skin pulled back, as well as his brain, which displayed large purple-red patches indicative of bleeding.

The prosecutor’s push for conviction included a back story on Rikers’ culture which, in her accounting, treated whistleblowers as snitches — and enabled abuse of power.

It’s rather amazing how all these Good Cops managed to create a “culture” in which anyone who reported abuses was treated as a snitch and where two Heroes responded to an inmate being beat to death by a psychotic murderer by holding him down while he kicked him in his head repeatedly, then lied about how he died.

Cop Caught Sleeping in Viral Youtube Video One of Four NJ Officers Arrested in Off-Duty Bar Fight

Belleville NJ Cop Sleeping Patrol Car

A New Jersey cop, who achieved infamy several years ago when he was photographed sleeping in his patrol car, has now been arrested for involvement in a bar fight.

Officer Jesse J. McKeough of the Belleville Police Department became a bit of a Youtube star when he was caught sleeping like a giant steroid infused baby inside his patrol car back in 2013. After photos of his nap break were posted publicly (see video embedded below) by Anthony Telinski and everyone on the planet laughed for hours on end, McKeough was suspended for an undisclosed period of time as a result. Of course, this was no laughing matter to McKeough’s co-workers and the Good Cops at the BPD immediately took action by harassing and retaliating against Telinski.

Three years later, Officer McKeough is back in the news, but for much worse than taking a beauty sleep while wrapped in his Magic Suit. McKeough was arrested along with three other off-duty Belleville police officers after they were involved in a bar fight that started inside the Pourhouse 17 Pub on Ridge Road in North Arlington and spilled out into the parking lot on Oct. 21st. What or who exactly started the fight has yet to be disclosed. The person assaulted by McKeough was hospitalized as a result of injuries sustained in the brawl.

Via NJ.com:

A 26-year-old man allegedly beaten up by an off-duty police officer at a crowded bar two months ago has described a chaotic scene during which he suffered blunt force trauma to his head and internal bleeding.

“Someone got pushed into me. When I went down to the floor I got repeatedly hit – it was mainly shots to the head,” said John Koski, 26, of Lyndhurst.

Koski said he was taken by North Arlington Volunteer Emergency Squad to a local hospital where he was treated for more than three hours.

According to a court summons, Jesse J. McKeough, 28, struck Koski repeatedly with his fist. McKeough, a patrol officer with the Belleville Police Department, is charged with simple assault. McKeough, a police officer for four years, has been suspended without pay.

Three other Belleville police officers are also suspended without pay in connection with the incident: John Clarizio, 32, Marco Zarfino, 24, and Giovanni Casillo, 39.

The four officers were arrested Monday in connection with the fight, which occurred Oct. 21 at Pourhouse 17 on Ridge Road.

Clarizio is charged with simple assault for punching a bar patron with a closed fist, according to a court summons. The officer is also charged with hindering apprehension for falsely telling a Lyndhurst police officer his name was “Anthony Michael Fasano,” the summons states.

Zarfino is charged with simple assault. A court summons states he punched a person in the bar.

Casillo is charged with simple assault for allegedly punching bar patron Vasilios Theofanidis, 39, according to a summons.

Theofanidis, described by authorities as a pool technician, is charged with simple assault for allegedly pushing a person in the bar, a summons states.

John Koski, the man who ended up at the hospital as a result of Officer McKeough’s attack, said that he didn’t even know what started the fight and was attacked unprovoked while sitting at the bar. So, the lesson learned here should probably be that once a bar fight starts you should either join in or hide behind the bar like in all the cowboy movies. Just sitting innocently at the bar leads to a hospital trip.

And cops are much less dangerous when they are passed out in their patrol cars with drool leaking out of their mouths.

Update: Looks Like Michael Slager Found That One Cop Apologist He Needed; Mistrial Pending

Yesterday, I posted about the fact that the murder trial of Officer Michael Slager had been turned over to the jury for deliberation on a verdict. Within that post, I discussed whether Slager would get away with the murder altogether or be given a light sentence via the lesser manslaughter charge.

My bet has been on him walking free via a hung jury, since in order to do so he only needs to have one of the 12 jurors be a cop apologist that refuses to find him guilty. The chances of that happening, regardless of his actual guilt are pretty good and history has born that out in previous trials of police.

Earlier this afternoon, the first signs that he has hit that (rigged) lottery began to be reported. One singular juror has indicated that he is unwilling to convict Slager in spite of the video that very clearly depicts him shooting Walter Scott in the back five times as he runs away from the North Charleston Police Officer.

Via NBCnews.com (emphasis added):

A lone juror said they cannot convict a white former police officer who fatally shot a black man in South Carolina, and the judge asked for clarification from the foreperson as to whether the jury is hopelessly deadlocked.

The juror in a letter to the court said “I cannot in good conscience consider a guilty verdict” against Michael Slager, a former patrolman who pulled over Walter Scott in North Charleston, and ended up shooting him as a bystander recorded the incident on video.

The jury foreperson said in a separate note to the court that it was only one juror who was “having issues,” Circuit Judge Clifton Newman said. The juror opposed to conviction said in the letter, “I cannot and will not change my mind,” Newman said.

Slager was charged with murder in Scott’s killing, although the jury was allowed to consider a lesser charge of manslaughter in addition to murder. Slager’s attorneys requested a mistrial.

The wording is interesting in the two highlighted statements. Note that he doesn’t say, “I don’t believe he is guilty” or “I can’t be convinced of his guilt.” In essence, he says, “I refuse to find him guilty.” And that’s the reality of the situation (and the many, many situations that preceded it). It’s not that they don’t understand they are guilty, they just refuse to render that verdict.

They’ll likely go through the motions for a bit longer before that request for a mistrial is granted. They may even decide to stage another trial to stave off the inevitable riots and protests for a while longer. However, they can only kick that can down the road so far. Michael Slager will walk and he’ll do it with a smirk on his face while discussing in interviews how difficult all of this was for him. Then he’ll file for back-pay and/or reinstatement to the police force through his union. And he’ll win since he wasn’t convicted.

NBC Video: The Jury Says It’s Deadlocked

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