Tag Archives: forced resignation

Henderson Police “Not Concerned About” Violent History of Newly Hired Deputy Police Chief Thedrick Andres

Newly hired Henderson NV Deputy Chief of Police Thedrick Andres shot Juan May during an off-duty incident while he was a sergeant at the Arlington Police Department in Texas

A photo taken earlier in the evening shows newly hired Henderson Deputy Police Chief Thedrick Andres and Juan May, the man Andres shot to death after a fight on a party bus.

In November, LaTesha Watson, formerly a deputy police chief with the Arlington (TX) Police Department was sworn in to replace Moers as the Henderson chief of police. Thedrick Andres, who served at the APD with Watson before retiring as a lieutenant, was subsequently hired to replace Long as Watson’s deputy police chief.

While there has been some unhappiness expressed over the department’s decision to pick candidates from out of state as replacements, Deputy Chief Andres’ work history would seem to be right on par with those working within Las Vegas area police departments. That history includes three incidents of violence, two of which involved the use of a firearm by Andres while he was off-duty, at the Arlington (TX) Police Department.

During what was described as a road rage incident, Andres pulled his gun on another driver after claiming that driver had threatened him with a hatchet. That “hatchet” that reportedly caused him to believe his life was in danger turned out to be a plastic ice scraper. Previously, while employed at the New Orleans Police Department, Andres was also accused of using excessive force in a citizen complaint.

Note: If you have videos, stories, upcoming events/protests, or personal interactions with the police (and/or “justice” system) that you would like to share, send them to us and we will do everything we can to bring it to the attention of the world. In addition, you can visit the Nevada Cop Block resources section for information and links to the rights of citizens when dealing with police, during which you should always be filming.

Party Bus Shooting

The most troubling incident from Andres’ past was his fatal shooting of a Marine veteran named Juan May in June of 2014. That incident began with a birthday party, which took place on a “party bus.” Although May and other relatives of his who were among the twenty people on that bus didn’t know Andres or that he was (at the time) a sergeant with the Arlington Police Department, the group picture above implies there was possibly some mutual friendships between them.

Juan May was murdered by Henderson Deputy Chief Thedrick Andres while he was a Sgt. at the Arlington Police Department

Juan May

According to descriptions, at some point someone (presumably May) jokingly suggested that Andres should dance on a stripper pole that was on the bus. That apparently offended Andres and led him to begin directing derogatory remarks at May and his relatives. This later escalated into a physical fight once they left the bus after Andres approached May and reignited the argument.

There are some differences in the details of what happened next among eyewitness statements. However, there are several common denominators among them. Everyone agrees that Andres is the one who approached May and began the final argument and that he had been drinking on the party bus. They also agree that Andres also hit Juan’s cousin, Patrick May, who was attempting to break up the fight.

The other point of agreement is that shortly after, when Juan May was walking back to his car, Andres began running to his own car. Witnesses state that “someone” yelled that he had a gun in his vehicle. Andres, in fact, retrieved that gun and killed May with it, later claiming he had fired in self-defense.

Not surprisingly (since grand juries are primarily used for that purpose in cases involving police officers), he was eventually exonerated by a grand jury in spite of the retrieval of a weapon after a fight being pretty well established as an act of premeditation.

Police Chief Latesha Watson is Not Concerned

It shouldn’t be surprising that Chief Watson isn’t concerned about Andres’ past. Of course, she worked with him for years in Texas and obviously is the reason he was hired to be the second in command at the Henderson Police Department. In spite of the fact her statement that “if someone was found guilty of wrongdoing, then they wouldn’t have a job,” when applied to police officers is at best a technicality, it’s not something that should be unexpected.

The Henderson Police Department's newly hired Deputy Chief of Police, Thedrick Andres, and Chief of Police, LaTesha Watson

Thedrick Andres and LaTesha Watson

However, the lack of concern by the City of Henderson is something that should draw a few more raised eyebrows. After all, Watson and Andres were hired to replace two police executives who were forced to resign after sexual harassment claims were made against them and the Henderson City Council was caught covering that up by portraying it as a “mutual parting of ways.

In addition, Assistant City Manager Greg Blackburn, who previously resigned from a city government position in North Las Vegas after a sexual harassment scandal, is currently under investigation again for (you guessed it) sexual harassment in Henderson and Mayor Debra March has also just been sanctioned over ethics violations. (At this point, it takes a bit of searching to find someone in the Henderson city government that isn’t under some sort of investigation.)

When you consider all that, maybe you should look to hire someone who doesn’t already have a history that includes excessive force complaints and pulling guns on (or actually shooting) unarmed people while off-duty. Maybe that’s a good idea for the City of Henderson for PR reasons, if nothing else. You know, hire someone who is less likely to create yet another misconduct scandal.

Of course, Henderson is the city known for not prosecuting (and later promoting) a cop who was caught on video repeatedly kicking a man suffering from diabetic shock in the head, because “they train officers to do that in the police academy.”

Related Content on NVCopBlock.org:

Coverup Exposed: Henderson Nevada’s Top Two Lawmen Forced to Resign for Sexual Harassment

Police Chief Patrick Moers Deputy Chief Bobby Long

Although first announced as “voluntarily stepping down” it recently emerged that Henderson (NV) Police Chief Patrick Moers and Deputy Chief Bobby Long were actually forced to resign.

It should come as no surprise to our readers that our police here in Nevada, Las Vegas Metro in particular, are corrupt from the top down.

From Metro’s Sheriff “Lyin’ Joe” Lombardo, his Undersheriff Kevin “Vagina Man” McMahill, all the way down to Commanders like Captain Yasenia Yatomi, and countless others. It’s like the saying goes, “A fish rots from the head down.” However, this top-down corruption doesn’t just begin or end with Metro.

It has just come out that the now ex-Henderson Police Chief Patrick Moers did NOT “voluntarily” step down from his position as was originally reported. Turns out he was FORCED OUT and that fact was covered up so that he could quietly collect his unused paid time off. These PTO hours ended up costing Nevada tax payers over $160,000, which is almost a whole year’s salary!

Not a bad deal, right? Sexually harass a woman and get almost a year’s salary. Rewarding such repulsive behavior with large cash payouts instead of punishing offenders isn’t exactly condoning the behavior but it definitely encourages it. City leaders should have outright fired this alleged womanizer and paid him nothing, instead they lied to the citizens they’re supposed to serve and essentially allowed a bad cop to steal money from The People. These cover ups are becoming far too frequent and far too costly and we are TIRED of it!

Note: If you have videos, stories, upcoming events/protests, or personal interactions with the police (and/or “justice” system) that you would like to share, send them to us and we will do everything we can to bring it to the attention of the world. In addition, you can visit the Nevada Cop Block resources section for information and links to the rights of citizens when dealing with police, during which you should always be filming.

But wait…it gets worse…

Henderson NV Police Chief Patrick Moers Deputy Chief Bobby Long

Former Henderson Police Chief Patrick Moers and former Deputy Chief Bobby Long

HPD’s #2 in charge recently received an even larger payout when he “voluntarily resigned” from his position. Henderson’s ex-Deputy Police Chief Bobby Long received $229,000 in paid leave to voluntarily step down instead of getting fired. The allegations against Long were that he was being “hostile toward at least one city employee.” City officials prefer to reach these so-called ‘voluntary separation agreements’ rather than flat out fire someone because it allows them to keep the allegations under wraps and these top brass scum get to save face while cashing out on the tax payers dime.

The City even went so far as to try and announce both of their separations quietly via an email sent out at 5:02pm, just after closing hours, on a Thursday, since all Henderson’s government offices are closed Friday-Sunday in the hopes that the apathetic masses wouldn’t notice and if they did they’d forget all about it come Monday morning. They really thought they were being slick but I hate to break it to you guys, we’re not that stupid and we see through your BS.

Unfortunately for them, there’s just no way to hide the resignations of the top two highest positions in the department in Nevada’s second largest city. How they went about it couldn’t have made their intentions more obvious. This was all just another attempted cover up by yet another of our many local corruption enforcement agencies…

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Deputy at #DAPL Protests Passed Out in Running Police Vehicle After Over 15 Vodka Shots and Prescription Meds

Deputy Ryan Fowler of the St. Croix County (WI) Sheriff’s Office reportedly had consumed between 12 and 26 shots of vodka within a three hour period before he was arrested in October. Further investigation revealed that he had also taken prescription medications prior to drinking that night. He also admitted that it was possible he had drank even more alcohol in his hotel room.

Deputy Fowler and three other St. Croix officers had been assigned to duty as part of the police response to the protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation outside of Bismark North Dakota at the time. As a result of the arrest, they were all four sent back to Wisconsin.

Fowler was discovered by Bismark police passed out in his police K-9 vehicle, which was running and in drive at the time. Officers who arrested him were investigating a report that he had been involved in an altercation (possibly with another cop) and subsequently stolen a sweatshirt from a man who had previously woken him up after seeing him asleep in his squad car.

In spite of the fact he was caught in a police vehicle, Deputy Fowler initially lied to the officers, stating his name was “John.” Upon searching the squad car, his real name was discovered once Fowler’s ID, as well as the stolen sweatshirt, was found. Eventually, after a paid vacation of about a month and a half, Fowler was allowed to resign instead of being fired.

Via the Twin Cities Pioneer Press:

According to an internal investigation report completed by St. Croix County Sheriff’s Office Lt. Cathy Borgschatz:

Bismarck police were dispatched at 11:34 p.m. Oct. 12, after a gas station attendant called on behalf of another man.

That man, identified as Daylan ChasingHawk, reported a fight at the Comfort Inn Hotel, where he claimed he witnessed a deputy drunk inside his squad car. The deputy stole ChasingHawk’s sweatshirt, according to a 911 call.

An officer arrived to find a St. Croix County sheriff’s squad car in the driving lane at the hotel. A look inside revealed a sleeping man in the driver’s seat and a police dog inside. The car was running.

The officer “noticed that the squad was in drive and Deputy Fowler had his foot on the brake,” the report states. She and other officers had to beat on the car’s window for more than a minute before Fowler stirred.

Fowler stepped out of the car and smelled strongly of alcohol. When asked his name by the officer, he told her it was “John.” Officers later learned his actual name after finding his driver’s license inside the car.

A sweatshirt was also found inside the vehicle. Other Bismarck officers were interviewed during the investigation, including one who relayed ChasingHawk’s account: That he encountered Fowler asleep in the squad car, shook him until he woke and received an offer from Fowler to buy his sweatshirt for $5.

“The deputy drove off in his squad car, with Daylan’s sweater and hadn’t paid Daylan the $5,” according to the officer’s statement.

Fowler was then run through field sobriety tests, some of which he failed, some of which he didn’t complete.

Fowler was arrested and taken to the Bismarck Police Department, where a breath test revealed a 0.23 blood-alcohol concentration.

Asked by Bismarck police how much he had to drink that night, Fowler said he had three drinks in the hotel bar and one in his room, prompting the officer to ask if he had more after he got back to his room. “Deputy Fowler stated that it was possible,” the report states…

Borgschatz learned the incident was preceded by an incident in Fowler’s hotel room at about 10:30 p.m. Oct. 12, when a Dane County (Wis.) deputy heard loud sounds coming from inside the room. The deputy later went to the room and told the men inside — a K-9 handler and another officer — to quiet down.

St. Croix County Sheriff’s Deputy Ryan Kelly, also a member of the four-person assignment, had earlier told Borgschatz that he and Fowler were in the room playing with Fowler’s police dog, Dugan, when they were told to be quiet.

“It seemed likely that Deputy Fowler, Deputy Kelly and the canine were only playing and the disturbance was due to the playful conduct with the dog and not any altercation,” the report states.

The Dane County deputy said as he was going back to his room, he saw one of the room’s occupants heading toward the exit with a dog.

Borgschatz later interviewed Fowler about the incident.

He said he took medication before going to the hotel bar, where he had “four or five” vodka-Red Bull drinks. Fowler said he had set an alarm for 9 p.m. that was going to be his reminder to go to bed, but he hit the snooze button since he had a full drink in front of him. He said he and Kelly stayed for another drink after that.

Fowler said that was the last thing he remembered, but noted that he didn’t feel drunk at the time. He said his first recollection after that was looking at paperwork inside the Bismarck police station. The medication, he later said in the interview, was a mitigating factor in the incident.

“Fowler is excusing his behavior because of a new prescribed medication,” the report states. “He was not able to admit that being a 0.234 affected [sic] his decision-making or memory. He blamed the bartender for getting him intoxicated.”

Borgschatz, who inspected the bar pours — 50/50 mixes, she reported — at the Comfort Inn as part of her investigation, concluded that Fowler had between 12 and 26 shots of vodka in less than three hours.

“It is likely he had more than 15 shots of vodka,” the report states.

The report outlines 12 department violations Fowler committed, ranging from refusal to follow orders to breaking the law.

As part of the internal investigation Deputy Fowler maintained that he should not have been arrested for some unexplained reason:

“Deputy Fowler stated he believes he should have never been arrested but wasn’t able to articulate what made the incident an unwarranted arrest,” the report states. “He only stated the whole situation should have been taken into account.”