Tag Archives: football

Former Chicago Bears Superbowl QB Jim McMahon Urges NFL Allow Medical Marijuana For Players

Jim McMahon Medical Marijuana NFL

Jim McMahon, the Superbowl XX winning quarterback from the 1985 Chicago Bears, a team which is often considered one of the best all-time teams and arguably the best defense in the history of the NFL, has joined the long list of people advocating for the medical use of marijuana.

Currently, McMahon is battling symptoms attributed to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), such as early dementia, severe headaches, memory loss and depression, all of which have been attributed to the effects of multiple concussions and for obvious reasons are especially prevalent among people involved in contact sports.

Even in states in which medical marijuana has already been legalized, the National Football League prohibits its use among players. Anyone testing positive for marijuana use, regardless of local laws (even in Washington and Colorado, which both allow recreational use), are subject to punishments that increase with each instance.

McMahon made his statements advocating for marijuana as an alternative to opiates for pain management while appearing as part of a panel discussion by retired NFL players at the Cannabis World Congress and Business Expo. The panel was held at Manhattan’s Javits Convention Center.

Via the Sporting News:

The panel, according to the New York Daily News, was moderated by former Giants defensive lineman Leonard Marshall and included former Bears quarterback Jim McMahon, former Broncos tight end Nate Jackson, former Broncos wide receiver Charlie Adams and former Jaguars offensive tackle Eben Britton.

McMahon, who is dealing with early dementia, severe headaches, memory loss and depression — all symptoms associated with too many concussions — believes he would be healthier now if he was allowed to use marijuana instead of pills during his playing career. Marijuana is an effective pain killer and less harmful than opiods, McMahon said.

“Hundreds of thousands of people are dying from [painkillers] and there’s not one case of people dying from the hemp plant,” McMahon said.

Britton added, “Juxtaposing my experiences with pharmaceutical drugs like Vicodin and Percocet, that made me angry and irritable, frustrated, didn’t get rid of any of the pain, made it difficult to sleep, increased my heart rate and made me feel crazy. On the other side of that there’s cannabis that helped me sleep, put me into a healing state of being where I was relieved from stress and anxiety as well as feeling the pain relief.”

Jackson, who appeared on an edition of HBO’s Real Sports that dealt with the same issue, added, “The owners of these teams are, by and large, wealthy men who are older and do not understand that this is a pretty innocuous substance.”

As is also mentioned in the Sporting News article, this offseason the Baltimore Ravens cut Eugene Monroe, a former first round pick who has campaigned publicly for the acceptance of medical marijuana in the NFL. Many people, including Monroe, have attributed that move to his strong advocacy for cannabis use, although the Ravens have denied that is the case.

Jim McMahon Superbowl XX MoonMcMahon, who was known as much for his flamboyant attitude and defiance of arbitrary or silly rules as he was for his play on the field, is no stranger to alternative medical practices or controversy. In one of the more famous photos from the build up to Superbowl XX, he mooned a helicopter while wearing a headband that said “ACUPUNCTURE” on it.

He later explained that he was just showing the media where he had received treatment for an injury he had received in a game the previous week. (The headband derived from an incident earlier in the season where he was fined $5,000 for having an Adidas label on his head band during a game and subsequently wore a headband with “ROZELLE” written on it in reference to the league commissioner, who had fined him.)

Jim McMahon Rozelle HeadbandIt’s silly and contradictory that the NFL approves the use of opiates and all kinds of other horrible pharmaceutical medications for players if they have a prescription (and sometimes without even having one), but prohibits the same medical rights for cannabis patients, even in locations where it can be legally prescribed by a doctor. In fact, it’s not at all unusual for players with lingering injuries to receive shots that numb the affected area in order to play during a game. Stories have even emerged of players receiving such shots in the locker room during a game in which they were injured.

So, it’s clearly not a case of the NFL being opposed to drug use in general or a concern for the safety or health of players. Their refusal to accept that playing in the NFL and improper care for concussions in the past increased the chances of players developing CTE alone is proof of that not being true.

The least they could do is give those players the option of using a safe and non-addictive option to treat the pain is inherent to the game. Being that there are different laws in the different cities which have NFL teams, there’s a small complication in the fact that some players would have access to legal medical marijuana while others wouldn’t because they state they live in still living in the dark ages.

However, in reality, all they would have to do is remove it from the list of drugs which they test for. Legally, they are not under any obligation to test for drugs, whether they are illegal or otherwise. Players certainly make enough money that they could set up residence during the offseason within the states that do allow its use for the next four or five years or so until it’s made legal not just for medical use, but for recreational use as well, nationwide. (That writings on the wall in big letters.)

Did Ex-Cop/Lawyer Help Frame Former Alabama Football Player for Murder?

This is a repost of an article originally published on the South East Alabama Cop Block website, which discusses some of the improprieties and possible misconduct by members of the Barbour County “justice” system. This involves the case of Will Dickerson, a former University of Alabama football player, who has been accused of murdering a man named Willie Pugh during a robbery.

Included in those who are alleged to have acted inappropriately and possibly even engaged in an outright framing of Dickerson, are the District attorney prosecuting the case, Ben Reeves, as well as Jeff Compton, a former cop now practicing as a defense attorney, who previously represented Dickerson. It was received via the Cop Block Submissions page.

Full story at Rickeystokesnews.com here, here and updated here.

willWill Dickerson (pictured left), former University of Alabama football player and personal friend of this author, has been in the Barbour County jail awaiting trial for murder since January of 2012. However, new information has come to light that may indicate his previous attorney Jeff Compton (pictured below), who is a former police officer, conspired with other unnamed police and government officials to hide evidence from Dickerson that would have long ago cleared him of all charges.

In the above linked article, Rickeystokesnews.com reporter, Jon Carroll, states “In confidence, members of the court system and law enforcement who feel justice is not being served have confirmed this and been willing to share multiple examples of the evidence.” indicating a large cover up. This alleged conspiracy also represents an obvious unwillingness on the part of court officials and police to uphold their oaths and bring the alleged conspirators to justice in any official capacity. Possibly indicating yet another case of the government showing preferential treatment to it’s own.

Dickerson’s trial is scheduled for February 2nd of this year. South East Alabama Cop Block will be present at the trial as much as possible in order to report any events allowed by the court for public dissemination.

UPDATE: According to Jon Carroll on Rickeystokesnews.com, the trial has been moved up to April and will be held in Russell County. After numerous complaints against Barbour County District Attorney Ben Reeves he has been summoned to the State Attorney General’s office. Mr. Carroll also quotes a “A long term law enforcement official we trust deeply” as saying:

“the district attorney is being pressured by Barbour county’s largest narcotics network to not identify the actual individuals who robbed and murdered Willie Pugh. Blood DNA of those individuals who actually murdered Pugh are in his possession. The State of Alabama has tested this evidence and confirmed it is not Pugh or Dickersons.” 

Mr. Carroll also posted this video:

This knowledge, if true, proves that local police and other officials who have taken oaths as public servants are either complicit in the cover up or at the very least are failing to arrest Mr. Reeves and Mr. Compton even though they KNOW they are breaking the law.

Remember, bad cops are bad. “Good” cops who look the other way or fail to enforce the law on their co-workers are WORSE!

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Were Your Father’s Cops Really That Much Better than Today’s?

Me in all my glory

Last year, during a pick up football game, I took off down the field at a full sprint, flew past the player defending me, and settled into the endzone for what should have been an easy touchdown. The quarterback threw the ball in a perfect spiral directly into my chest, which it promptly bounced off of and landed in the arms of that previously vanquished defender, who had by then caught back up to me.

Shortly after that, while playing defense, I tore a muscle in my calf landing me on the couch for a week straight and keeping me on the sidelines for several months.

Of course, in 10 or 20 years (probably 30), once my football days are over for good, you probably won’t hear a lot about that pair of catastrophes. Instead, you’ll most likely hear about the two touchdowns I caught earlier in that game. Or even more likely, I’ll tell you about that 90+ yard interception return for a touchdown I had earlier this year, during which that picture to the right was taken.

Howard Zinn (right), being arrested for the crime of not wanting to kill innocent people.

History has a way of glossing over the bad stuff in favor of the good ol’ days. That is especially true when the one doing the story telling is also the one involved in all the negative stories. Even more so when those stories inspire a deep sense of shame.

I was recently reminded of this particular tendency of  human nature to remember things much better than they actually were when a friend of  mine mentioned to me that he once thought Anarchism was “way out there.” However, now he was beginning to reconsider because of all the instances of police brutality and abuse he’s seen recently. In particular, he was shocked by the recent arrests of members of Food Not Bombs in Orlando for the “crime” of feeding hungry people. Specifically, because it was the “locals” that were doing the arresting.

A lunch counter sit-in at a North Carolina Woolworth’s

It isn’t uncommon for people to have the image of the “friendly neighborhood cop” in their mind when they think of policemen of the past. That foregone day when the local cop patrolled his beat, knew everyone by name, and protected the residents from those bad guys that wanted to do them harm.

Unfortunately, these memories are nothing but illusions or at best selective memories. In many ways, the cops have indeed gotten worse. By way of standardized training and selective recruitment with a heavy tendency toward recent combat veterans and/or people with aggressive personalities, the modern police force has become much more nationalized and militarized. As a result, they are more willing to use force in any given situation and less likely disobey illegal or immoral commands.

The inevitable response by the State’s enforcers.

However, as much as that is true, the only real difference between now and then is a matter of degrees. The thugs beating people in the streets at anti-war protests during the Vietnam war and spraying school children with fire hoses during the civil rights era were, in fact,  locals. Officer O’Malley, the friendly neighborhood beat cop of yesteryear might have taken it easy on Sean, the local hellion, but he knew what had to be done when some uppity nigger refused to step down from the lunch counter at Woolworth’s or some dirty hippie decided to burn his draft card and there were no shortage of cops willing to do it.

As the saying goes, the cops are the tip of the State’s spear and the tip is the part that does the real damage. To believe otherwise is to forget the truth of what really happened and create a fantasy world based on those glory days that never really were.

 

(Originally posted at EYEAM4ANARCHY)