Tag Archives: drug dealer

Cleveland Cop Who Previously Shot Unarmed Man, Allowed To Attend Rehab Instead Of Jail After Drug Arrest

A member of the Cleveland Police Gang Unit, who was involved in a 2015 shooting of an unarmed man that the department initially lied about, was later himself busted for drugs. However, instead of going to jail, he’s been given a deal that will allow him to go to rehab instead of having his guilty plea count as a conviction.

In the shooting, for which a lawsuit is set to go to trial soon, Detective Jon Periandri claimed that the man he shot during a drug bust, Joevon Dawson, had gotten out of a car with a gun in his hand. The other five Good Cops at the scene backed up his story and one of them also moved a bullet casing to support the claim. Even Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams got in on the act, making a statement to the press at the scene that Dawson was armed when he was shot.

However, information later released as part of the lawsuit indicated that the only gun recovered at the scene had been stored within the center console area on the inside of the vehicle. Investigators from the Ohio Attorney General’s Office Bureau of Criminal Investigation concluded that the gun could not have been used by Dawson.

Meanwhile, even as he was in the process of arresting and shooting people for drug crimes he was simultaneously buying drugs by the handful. In fact, evidence showed that he literally ordered drugs while on duty as part of the narcotics squad. Incidentally, his taste for prescription pain killers and heroin were uncovered after a drug bust that included the Brooklyn, Ohio Law Director and the son of the mayor of Parma, Ohio.

Via Cleveland.com:

Periandri would soon face criminal investigation for another incident that happened in the weeks before and after the shooting.

In October 2015, as investigators continued probing the Dawson shooting, local and federal authorities raided the Seven Hills home of Alfonso Yunis, a suspected drug dealer.

Police found Yunis counting and crushing pills at his house along with then-Brooklyn law director Scott Clausen and attorney Brian Byrne, son of Parma Mayor Mike Byrne.

All three were arrested. A subsequent tip from a confidential police informant and a search of Yunis’ cellphone turned up hundreds of text messages with a number that was later traced to Periandri, according to court records.

The messages appeared to be “criminal in nature” and showed Periandri, a detective in charge of investigating and arresting drug dealers, repeatedly requesting to buy prescription painkillers and heroin off of Yunis, and even agreeing to act as a middleman for some drug deals, according to a search warrant affidavit obtained by cleveland.com in December 2015.

Dawson’s attorney entered the affidavit as evidence in the federal lawsuit on Thursday.

Messages seized from May 23, 2015 showed that Periandri ordered drugs while he working during protests in Cleveland that followed the acquittal of Cleveland police officer Michael Brelo on manslaughter charges in the 2012 killing of an unarmed couple. He also used a shorthand for what the affidavit describes as a racial slur to describe the protesters.

Cleveland police’s internal affairs unit launched an investigation and, that same month, obtained a warrant to collect a hair sample from Periandri and have it tested for drugs.

But before they could execute the warrant, Periandri took a medical leave of absence and checked himself into a drug rehabilitation center in California, internal investigators wrote in the affidavit.

The deal

A May 13, 2016 email between from Cleveland police commander Brian Heffernan to Williams, the head of internal affairs Lt. Monroe Goins and another Cleveland police officer indicated that Periandri was in talks with Assistant Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Jim Gutierrez.

The two agreed that Periandri would be charged by information and plead guilty to a felony drug possession charge at a June 7 court hearing. He would receive treatment in lieu of conviction, the email says.

Periandri would then serve a year’s probation, and the charge would be dropped from his record if he successfully completed treatment. In exchange, Periandri agreed to give up his certification to be a police officer.

But that court hearing never happened.

Prosecutors did not charge Periandri until Thursday, more than eight months after the original offer, according to court records. And the information was not delivered to the clerk’s office until about 1:30 p.m. Monday, after reporters began asking the prosecutor’s office about Periandri’s case.

The information, signed by Gutierrez, Periandri and Periandri’s attorney, Robert Dixon, is stamped Jan. 19. A note stuck on the outside of Periandri’s file says the information was “back-dated” to Jan. 19.

Kathleen Caffrey, a spokeswoman for the prosecutor’s office, said on Monday that Periandri had been charged by information and pleaded guilty in June.

After a reporter asked for a copy of the information and more information about the court hearing on Tuesday, she called to say that she had misinterpreted a conversation with Gutierrez and that no June agreement was reached.

Periandri was allowed to retire from the department for medical reasons on Aug. 9, 2016, Williams said.

Also, when reporters began asking about the drug “conviction” as a result of discovery information from the lawsuit, a spokesman for the prosecutor’s office explained that the records of it had never been entered into the Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court’s public docket due to an “IT issue.” #SeemsLegit

Harris County Sheriff’s Office Drops Drug Charges Against Texas Man After “Meth” Turns Out to be Cat Litter

A sock full of cat litter ended up leading to a Texas man being publicly branded as a drug dealer, when deputies with the Harris County Sheriff’s Office managed to mistake it for meth. In yet another case of faulty field tests that have repeatedly been exposed as wildly inaccurate, police issued a press release and bragged on Facebook about how their “big drug bust” had kept everyone’s children save from the scourge of methamphetamines.

Meanwhile, Ross Lebeau was taken to jail on charges of drug possession with the intent to distribute, based on the “meth” weighing in at over half a pound. As a result, he lost work and will be forced to go through the process of having his record expunged, even though the charges were dropped, to avoid the stigma of having been identified, very publicly, as a drug dealer.

In spite of that, Lebeau is surprisingly unwilling to place any blame on the deputies who used notoriously innacurate equipment to declare the cat litter was an illegal substance. For their part, the Harris County Sheriff’s Office released a second press release, in which they had no problem whatsoever placing the blame squarely on Lebeau’s shoulders saying that the deputies did everything right and that his statement that he didn’t know what the “unknown substance” was is what was responsible for the mix-up.

Via ABC13.com (in Houston):

Lebeau and his attorney do not blame the deputies for the ordeal, rather the field tests.

“Ultimately it might be bad budget-cutting testing equipment they need to re-evaluate,” said George Reul, who added prosecutors practically laughed when he told them it was cat litter.

“I would like an apology,” said Lebeau.

He says the accusation has caused him to lose work, not to mention the embarrassment. He will work to expunge his record.

“I was wrongly accused and I’m going to do everything in my power, with my family’s backing, to clear my name,” he said.

Harris County Sheriff’s Office Statement:
The Harris County Sheriff’s Office deputies stopped Mr. LeBeau for a traffic offense on December 5, 2016 at 4:30 p.m. During that initial stop the deputies detected a strong odor of Marijuana emitting from his vehicle. Mr. LeBeau was question and admitted to having marijuana in the console of his vehicle.

The drugs were recovered and in the process of inventorying his vehicle a substance was found wrapped in one sock in his vehicle. Mr. LeBeau was questioned about the contents at which time he indicated that he had no idea what it was. The deputies followed proper procedures and field tested the substance on two separate occasions which field tested positive for methamphetamines, notified the District Attorney’s Office who accepted charges for possession of controlled substance of 200 grams and Mr. LeBeau posted bond and was released.

During the investigation Mr. LeBeau failed to identify the substance and later, after being released indicated on social media that the substance was cat litter that he kept in a sock in his vehicle.

Regarding this incident all indication shows that the deputies followed basic procedures and followed established protocol related to this incident. Because of the established procedures in place and this contraband was submitted to the Institute of Forensic Science it was determined not to be methamphetamine and charges were dismissed.

It doesn’t look like he’s going to get that apology. At least the prosecutors were able to get a good laugh out of it.

Miami Cop Pleads Guilty to Taking Bribes to Protect and Serve Drug Dealers

Miami Police Officer Jose Maldonado-Dick accepted a plea bargain last week in which he admitted to accepting bribes to essentially serve as security for drug dealers while they were making sales. This apparently was something he had been doing prior to the two instances for which he was arrested in October of 2014.

Unfortunately for him, a police informant tipped off some of his co-workers that Ofc. Maldonado-Dick was involved in drug sales. They then set up two additional drug deals, which they recorded.

According to testimony at his trial, Maldonado-Dick received $1,900 in exchange for sitting inside his patrol car, with his department issued pistol drawn and ready to murder someone, while two staged drug deals took place. He also offered some helpful “how-to’s” on being a better drug dealer between the sales.

Via NBC 6 Miami:

Maldonado-Dick allegedly used his uniform, gun and badge to protect drug dealers and make sure they were safe to conduct their transactions on the streets…

According to the arrest affidavit, a confidential police informant called Maldonado-Dick to arrange two illegal drug transactions involving large amounts of cocaine. The informant told Maldonado he needed protection during the transactions, according to prosecutors.

Maldonado met with the informant several times and oversaw the two drug transactions conducted by the informant and an undercover officer, according to the affidavit. For one of the transactions, Maldonado-Dick suggested they use the McDonald’s parking lot near his patrol area, the affidavit said. The officer allegedly arrived to each meeting in his marked City of Miami Police patrol car. He was dressed in full uniform and armed with his standard issue Glock handgun, the affidavit said.

Because of the fact he used a gun while playing bodyguard for what he thought were drug dealers, Maldonado-Dick was originally facing a life sentence for each of his two trafficking charges. Typically, Florida courts are particularly harsh in regards to cocaine based charges due it’s prevalence there and have very long mandatory minimum sentencing restrictions along with a reluctance to offer plea bargains. In fact:

It is important to note that prosecutors do not waive minimum mandatory prison sentences, reduce charges, or offer reduced sentences just because your criminal defense attorney asked them to. It also makes no difference whether you are willing to do community service hours, seek counseling or attend rehab.

The only thing that would motivate a prosecutor to act on a trafficking in cocaine case is a legal issue or an evidentiary problem. (Emphasis added)

Unlike possession of cocaine for personal use, trafficking in cocaine is the most severe commercial drug offense. Someone charged with trafficking in cocaine should not expect any mercy whatsoever from prosecutors.

Of course, if you’re wearing a magic suit and shiny badge while trafficking coke then those prosecutors are much more merciful than they are with ordinary victims of the War on (Some) Drugs, even when you were caught on video doing it and the evidence is pretty much airtight. Instead of a life sentence or even the 15 year mandatory minimum for the crimes he was originally charged with, Ofc. Maldonado-Dick was offered a plea bargain for just three and a half years in jail and another three years probation.

Mount Vernon Ohio Detective Arrested for Drug Dealing and Extortion

Corrupt MVPD Detective

MVPD Detective Matt Dailey

Last week, the FBI arrested Matt Dailey, a detective with the Mount Vernon (Ohio) Police Department, on drug trafficking charges related to the sale of marijuana, meth, ecstasy, coke, and opiate-based pain pills. In addition, he faces charges of extortion and the use of a gun while engaging in drug sales. Detective Dailey had previously been suspended (with pay) on September 18th. While the reason for that suspension was not disclosed, it is presumed that it was due to the FBI’s investigation of his drug crimes.

Details within the FBI’s arrest report, indicate that Dailey used his position as a police officer to supply drugs to and facilitate the sale of those drugs by a confidential informant, who he had come into contact with during previous drug investigations. He also used his position and knowledge of drug investigations being conducted by local law enforcement to encourage the confidential informant (CI) to sell the drugs for him. He indicated to the CI that all of the drug investigations within the Mount Vernon Police Department, as well as the Knox County Sheriff’s Office, went through him. That CI stated that he perceived Dailey’s stated ability to influence drug investigations as both an assurance he would be protected from prosecution and an implied threat that if he didn’t help sell the drugs he could be set up for a drug arrest.

banner buy shiny badgesMany of the drugs Det. Dailey supplied to the CI were acquire by stealing drugs that had been confiscated in previous raids from the evidence room. Although at least initially many of the drugs were still contained within evidence bags, he claimed to the CI that he was getting the drugs from a fictional cousin and that he was only selling the drugs because this “cousin” was in trouble since he owed money to a drug dealer and he was trying to help him pay off that debt. In reality, he bought the drugs that he didn’t steal from the MVPD evidence room from a dealer in Columbus. That dealer later also became a confidential informant for the FBI against Dailey.

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