Tag Archives: Denver

False Imprisonment: Its Increasing Frequency and the Huge Cost It Imposes on Society

The following post was shared with the CopBlock Network anonymously by a reader, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

If you have a video, personal story involving police misconduct and/or abuse, or commentary about a law enforcement related news story, we would be happy to have you submit it. You can find some advice on how to get your submission published on the CopBlock Network within this post.

Police Abuses on the Rise

It’s no secret that police brutality and misconduct has been on the rise recently with cases in the news like Eric Garner who was suffocated in a choke hold by police and killed for illegally selling cigarettes. Similarly, a 12-year-old boy Tamir Rice was shot and killed after playing with a toy gun in the park. The level of uneasiness between police officers and citizens has hit an all-time high and we see this unrest play out in society. Police brutality is not the only form of police misconduct- false arrest of citizens can be an excruciating experience that sends innocent people to prison for simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

For example, Chicago’s taxpayers have had to pay over $120 million for the racial torture committed by one police commander, Jon Burge. Part of the disconnect between officers and citizens is the unfairness in power and how that power is used. To add on to this, police are offered different treatment when it comes to false arrests or misconduct. Although Burge oversaw the torture of over 118 black men – which would typically lead to decades in prison – he was released in three-and-a-half years and sent to a halfway house. All the men he tortured remain behind bars.

Police officers were granted a Qualified Immunity Doctrine by the Supreme Court which essentially states that police officers are innocent of harm towards their suspects in most cases due to their risky and honorable line of work. The best intentions are seen to be associated with most police officers, but has that been the case recently?

Typically, false arrest from police officers falls into the police misconduct category, which can also encompass police brutality and wrongful death. According to the University of Michigan Law School’s National Registry of Exonerations report, 75% of homicide exonerations involved police misconduct. One widely publicized example of a wrongful arrest was James Bain, who was convicted of kidnapping and rape at the age of 18. He served 35 years for a vicious crime he did not commit. Although DNA evidence was tested and presented prior, he was refused further DNA testing from the courts until his fifth try in 2006. Although misidentification from eyewitnesses account for 75% of all convictions that are overturned by DNA evidence, Bain was wrongfully arrested and incarcerated by police.

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How Does False Imprisonment Affect the Public?

Some people may think that the police arrest people who they think are guilty of a crime, and if they are wrongfully arrested, they are quickly released and go about their happy lives. That is far from the truth in most cases where the arrest was outright wrong and unlawful. Many people who are falsely arrested fight back and sue the police officer who wronged them and because of this, the public is responsible for paying that fee.

Amount of Money City Taxpayers Have Paid for Police Misconduct:

  • Chicago: $521 million from 2004-2014
  • Cleveland: $8.2 million between 2004-2014
  • Denver: $12 million since 2011
  • Dallas: $6.6 million between 2011-2014
  • Los Angeles: $101 million between 2002-2011

For example, Robert Graham was arrested for disorderly conduct by a police officer who was stuck in traffic behind him. Due to the gridlock traffic in New York City, Graham was also stuck in traffic and unable to move. The police officers wrongfully arrested Graham due to the circumstances of the situation. Graham’s wrongfully arrested cases was one of the ones that contributed to New York taxpayers paying $18 million to pay back people who were wrongfully arrested by officers.

According to Jon Norinsberg, a false imprisonment attorney, New York city police may only legally arrest citizens if:

  1. The police have an arrest warrant.
  2. The police have probable cause that you committed a crime.
  3. You are interfering with a police investigation or arrest.
  4. The police believe you are a criminal attempting to flee a crime scene.

Why are Police Officers Getting Away with False Imprisonment?

The number of innocent people behind bars is the highest number it has ever been historically, so it is only natural to question the source – the police. Why has it become okay to so quickly convict people and rarely face punishment as a police officer for wrongfully arresting someone? The issue gets stickier when videos of police officers using excessive force and even killing citizens when they appeared to pose no threat. Are there consequences for that? Rarely.

Unfortunately, false arrests happen and can be scary to argue your case in front of a judge – especially because police are most often shielded by the Qualified Immunity Doctrine exercised by the Supreme Court. This is a protective order that is designed to protect police officers from facing punishments from their mistakes or unlawful actions. In theory, this Qualified Immunity Doctrine was originally designed to shield officers who are properly bringing justice to criminals and who handle situations appropriately – if someone is upset for getting arrested if they deserve it, well this doctrine will protect the police from this potential complaint or lawsuit. Since videos have been released of police officers using unnecessary excessive force on unarmed people, citizens are growing scared that officers are abusing this immunity from the Supreme Court to get away with their unjust behavior. This is where a disconnect lies between police officers and citizens.

Where is the Accountability From the Police?

Why is it that as a society we only started paying attention to police misconduct and false arrests when Netflix featured programs like Making a Murderer?

Police officers are designed to keep our communities safe. While most cops are heroes and upstanding citizens who work hard to protect our safety, those who entered the police force to unlawfully assert power over others and take advantage of their badge are getting more press in recent news. Although it’s an unfortunate circumstance, it is important to stay educated on what is happening in society to better educate yourself and to hopefully make a positive change.

Denver Cop Who Recorded Himself Stealing Cash From Suspect Given Plea Deal For Probation

Information included in the following post was shared with the CopBlock Network anonymously, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

In October of last year, CopBlock Network Contributor Asa J  posted about Officer Julian Archuleta of the Denver Police Department, who apparently forgot he was wearing a body camera and recorded himself stealing $1,200 from the car of a suspect. The car he had taken the money from was involved in a roll over accident during a high speed chase following an incident in which the owner and a passenger had fired shots at two police vehicles.

A detective that reviewed the video as part of the investigation later noticed that the video showed a $100 bill, but the money that had been turned in as evidence did not include any $100 dollar bills.

Via the Denver Post:

On Oct. 7, Archuleta, a patrol officer in northwest Denver, assisted in the investigation after two suspects in a vehicle fired shots in the direction of two police vehicles parked at a 7-Eleven store. A short pursuit ensued, investigators say, ending with the suspects’ vehicle rolling over near the intersection of East 50th Avenue and Washington Street.

The driver took off on foot and a passenger was left unconscious in the vehicle, police said.

Archuleta’s body camera recorded as he searched a suspect’s clothing and took pictures of the wrecked car, according to his arrest affidavit.

In the footage, Archuleta picked up a stack of cash with a $100 bill on top. He removed that bill, and the footage showed him shuffling papers and cash in his patrol car, the affidavit said.

A detective who later reviewed the body camera footage noticed the $100 bill and questioned why only $118 had been logged into evidence. Archuleta later produced $1,200 and told another detective that it must have fallen into his bag, the affidavit said.

The affidavit noted that Archuleta’s actions also violated Denver Police Department policy on handling evidence and/or personal property.

His excuse that it had somehow fallen into his “war bag” unbeknownst to him for some odd reason didn’t work. Archuleta was originally charged with a felony for tampering with physical evidence and two misdemeanors of first-degree official misconduct and theft. In addition, as a result of his evidence tampering and contamination of the scene, the two suspects were never prosecuted (way to have your Brothas’ backs).

Of course, rather than facing any sort of real consequences for his actions, he was instead gifted with a plea deal that allowed him to cop to (you saw what I did there) misdemeanors with the felony being dropped. After entering his guilty plea on Monday, Officer Archuleta was only sentenced to 180 days of probation. He was also allowed to resign instead of being fired.

Obviously, it’ll be a long, hard six months before he can go out and get hired at another police department.

After Recent Shootings of Police, Cops Prepare to Double Down on the Police State

Police State Militarization Cop Block

The following post was originally published at TheAntiMedia.org under the original title “Here Are the New Tactics Police Are Preparing to Roll out in Your Communityand was written by Darius Shahtahmasebi.

In the post, Shahtahmasebi discusses how the police plan to respond to the recent shootings of police by citizens in several cities (this was written prior to the incident in San Diego) across the country. Not surprisingly, instead of stepping back and saying, “maybe all those times we unnecessarily shot people and/or refused to hold each other accountable for it or even essentially celebrated it had something to do with this” police nationwide are preparing to become even more militarized and violent toward the citizens they claim to protect and serve.

Here Are the New Tactics Police Are Preparing to Roll out in Your Community

Following the recent events in the United States, which have resulted in armed civilians taking on police officers—namely in DallasBaton Rouge, and most recently in Kansas City, Kansas —  police forces across the country are set to adjust their strategies and tactics.

An interesting detail to note is that on July 11, 2016 — following the first deadly attacks on police officers that occurred in Dallas — Reuters reported police were set to rethink their tactics in nearly half of America’s 30 largest cities. They evidently didn’t act swiftly enough (a number of deadly attacks followed shortly after). It’s either that or the suggested police tactics were never going to address the root causes of the problem we are facing.

So what kind of changes can we expect to see?

The most prominent change to occur is the pairing up of police officers. However, some more drastic suggestions are also in the pipeline. For example, the Indianapolis police force has said it will consider the use of robots to “deliberately deliver lethal force.” Denver’s police union has called for officers to be able to wear riot gear for local protests, and to be armed with AR-15 assault rifles while on patrol at the Denver International Airport.

In the wake of the Baton Rouge shooting, other changes likely to occur include: requiring that two cars respond to all calls, shifting officers to serve as extra backup, imposing increased security and surveillance, increasing the number of helicopter patrols, and suspending solo patrols.

It seems as if the police are considering all options — anything, that is, but refraining from summarily executing unarmed civilians in broad daylight. At the very least, they could start by prosecuting those responsible for such incidents. Apparently, however, that is too much to ask of those who are sworn to protect and serve.

America’s current president, elected on promises of hope and change, has told police officers across the country that “we have your back.” This is noteworthy because to date, there has been no concrete effort on the part of the president to address the underlying issues that have resulted in the uprising starting to unfold. To date, he has insisted on ploys that are nothing but politically acceptable attempts at pleasing all parties involved. I would go so far as to argue Donald Trump’s racist tirades do more for minority groups — by empowering and uniting them against his demagoguery — than Barack Obama has done his whole time in office, which has reflected his unwillingness to actually represent them on issues that grossly affect them.

The saddest part about this ongoing issue is that the tactics as suggested by satirical newspaper, The Onion, are more honest than any conversation our police departments or politicians are having about police brutality in the United States.

In particular, the outlet suggested the ability to ensure this can all legally be thrown out the window if a cop feels threatened” is something police forces across the country are so apt at implementing, The Onion need not have mentioned it all together.

Denver Police Sued by Man Coerced Into Murder Confession at Age of Fourteen

When he was just fourteen years old Lawrence Lorenzo Montoya, was arrested on suspicion of having committed a murder. Initially, he continually insisted that he was innocent and other evidence also indicated that was the case.

In spite of that, Denver detectives concealed the evidence that would exonerate him and eventually bullied and coerced him into a confession. Montoya subsequently was convicted based on that false confession and ended up spending thirteen years in prison before his innocence was proven by DNA evidence and he was released.

Now he’s filed a $30 million dollar lawsuit against the Denver Police Department, as well as the city and county of Denver over the life sentence he received for the wrongful conviction in the murder of Emily Johnson, a Denver teacher, on New Years Day 2000.

Via Fox 31 Denver:

Denver homicide detectives grilled Montoya for 2 1/2 hours, most of the time without even a parent present.

Attorney Lisa Polansky said they were, “Yelling and screaming in his face, making up evidence, banging on the table and cornering him against the wall. Telling him he’s going to spend the rest of his life in prison and should say goodbye to his mother.”

Lawrence Lorenzo Montoya Denver DetectiveThe police interrogation tape shows detectives lying to Montoya about the evidence and statement from other teens. Montoya told police that he was joy-riding in the stolen car the next day but did not commit the crime, wasn’t there when it happened and did not know anything about it.

According to the lawsuit, at least 65 times Montoya told police he did not have anything to do with the death. Finally, sobbing, he told police what they wanted to hear.

“I without a doubt believe he was coerced,” Polansky said.

“He ends up being convicted of a crime because the police coerced him to confess,” attorney David Fisher said.

According to the lawsuit, the interrogation tape shows detectives coaching Montoya through the false confession. It accuses police of ignoring or lying about other evidence that cleared Montoya.

Montoya was charged as an adult, convicted and sentenced to life in prison.  He spent 13 years, seven months and 13 days behind bars until a judge vacated the conviction in 2014 after new DNA testing exonerated him.

Lawrence Lorenzo Montoya Denver False ConvictionFisher said it’s hard to understand why an innocent person would confess, but points out 44 percent of juveniles exonerated by DNA were coerced into false confessions.

“To me there’s nothing worse than a kid who at 14 years old went into an adult prison facility.  It could be avoided and it needs to be avoided,” he said.

Added Polansky: “The district attorneys need to admit their mistake and I think it’s more than a mistake. Their intentional conduct in fabricating and continuing this injustice.”

Not surprisingly, Montoya’s lawyer says that he is having a hard time readjusting to society after those Heroes from the Denver PD purposely cost him roughly half of his life up to this point, in spite of the fact they knew he wasn’t guilty of the murder and had evidence to show that.

And of course, regardless of what amount the taxpayers will be forced to pay Montoya once the lawsuit settles, they will not be punished in any way whatsoever for their intentional acts.

Former Chicago Bears Superbowl QB Jim McMahon Urges NFL Allow Medical Marijuana For Players

Jim McMahon Medical Marijuana NFL

Jim McMahon, the Superbowl XX winning quarterback from the 1985 Chicago Bears, a team which is often considered one of the best all-time teams and arguably the best defense in the history of the NFL, has joined the long list of people advocating for the medical use of marijuana.

Currently, McMahon is battling symptoms attributed to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), such as early dementia, severe headaches, memory loss and depression, all of which have been attributed to the effects of multiple concussions and for obvious reasons are especially prevalent among people involved in contact sports.

Even in states in which medical marijuana has already been legalized, the National Football League prohibits its use among players. Anyone testing positive for marijuana use, regardless of local laws (even in Washington and Colorado, which both allow recreational use), are subject to punishments that increase with each instance.

McMahon made his statements advocating for marijuana as an alternative to opiates for pain management while appearing as part of a panel discussion by retired NFL players at the Cannabis World Congress and Business Expo. The panel was held at Manhattan’s Javits Convention Center.

Via the Sporting News:

The panel, according to the New York Daily News, was moderated by former Giants defensive lineman Leonard Marshall and included former Bears quarterback Jim McMahon, former Broncos tight end Nate Jackson, former Broncos wide receiver Charlie Adams and former Jaguars offensive tackle Eben Britton.

McMahon, who is dealing with early dementia, severe headaches, memory loss and depression — all symptoms associated with too many concussions — believes he would be healthier now if he was allowed to use marijuana instead of pills during his playing career. Marijuana is an effective pain killer and less harmful than opiods, McMahon said.

“Hundreds of thousands of people are dying from [painkillers] and there’s not one case of people dying from the hemp plant,” McMahon said.

Britton added, “Juxtaposing my experiences with pharmaceutical drugs like Vicodin and Percocet, that made me angry and irritable, frustrated, didn’t get rid of any of the pain, made it difficult to sleep, increased my heart rate and made me feel crazy. On the other side of that there’s cannabis that helped me sleep, put me into a healing state of being where I was relieved from stress and anxiety as well as feeling the pain relief.”

Jackson, who appeared on an edition of HBO’s Real Sports that dealt with the same issue, added, “The owners of these teams are, by and large, wealthy men who are older and do not understand that this is a pretty innocuous substance.”

As is also mentioned in the Sporting News article, this offseason the Baltimore Ravens cut Eugene Monroe, a former first round pick who has campaigned publicly for the acceptance of medical marijuana in the NFL. Many people, including Monroe, have attributed that move to his strong advocacy for cannabis use, although the Ravens have denied that is the case.

Jim McMahon Superbowl XX MoonMcMahon, who was known as much for his flamboyant attitude and defiance of arbitrary or silly rules as he was for his play on the field, is no stranger to alternative medical practices or controversy. In one of the more famous photos from the build up to Superbowl XX, he mooned a helicopter while wearing a headband that said “ACUPUNCTURE” on it.

He later explained that he was just showing the media where he had received treatment for an injury he had received in a game the previous week. (The headband derived from an incident earlier in the season where he was fined $5,000 for having an Adidas label on his head band during a game and subsequently wore a headband with “ROZELLE” written on it in reference to the league commissioner, who had fined him.)

Jim McMahon Rozelle HeadbandIt’s silly and contradictory that the NFL approves the use of opiates and all kinds of other horrible pharmaceutical medications for players if they have a prescription (and sometimes without even having one), but prohibits the same medical rights for cannabis patients, even in locations where it can be legally prescribed by a doctor. In fact, it’s not at all unusual for players with lingering injuries to receive shots that numb the affected area in order to play during a game. Stories have even emerged of players receiving such shots in the locker room during a game in which they were injured.

So, it’s clearly not a case of the NFL being opposed to drug use in general or a concern for the safety or health of players. Their refusal to accept that playing in the NFL and improper care for concussions in the past increased the chances of players developing CTE alone is proof of that not being true.

The least they could do is give those players the option of using a safe and non-addictive option to treat the pain is inherent to the game. Being that there are different laws in the different cities which have NFL teams, there’s a small complication in the fact that some players would have access to legal medical marijuana while others wouldn’t because they state they live in still living in the dark ages.

However, in reality, all they would have to do is remove it from the list of drugs which they test for. Legally, they are not under any obligation to test for drugs, whether they are illegal or otherwise. Players certainly make enough money that they could set up residence during the offseason within the states that do allow its use for the next four or five years or so until it’s made legal not just for medical use, but for recreational use as well, nationwide. (That writings on the wall in big letters.)

Independent Media Being Targeted at Recent Police Brutality Protests

Unicorn Riot Reporter ArrestIt’s not exactly a new thing for the police to target the media, nor is there any lack of evidence for that. Arrests of journalists in Ferguson were a staple of the police state-style repression of protests there. Also, the media corrals in Baltimore that kept reporters safely away from any opportunities to capture police abuses on film were pretty well documented during those riots.

Outright targeting and arrests of independent media and CopBlockers have been especially prevalent not just during protests, but also during cop watch activities and whenever people have filmed the cops. There’s obviously no shortage of examples of that on CopBlock.org over the past five years. In fact, members of Nevada Cop Block had to overnight a press pass to Mike BlueHair of FTP Portland when he was in Ferguson covering the protests there because the police and National Guard were illegally requiring media credentials in order for people to film, and imposing curfews on people without press passes.

Something that does appear to be a recent development, though, is that police now apparently have a book of names and photos that they are carrying with them. According to reports such as this one from “Unicorn Riot,” they are using this book to identify and target for arrest, without legal cause, members of independent and/or online-based media. The video below shows police in Denver, during a protest against the murder of Paul Castaway on Monday, push their way through a group of people recording the protest, isolate, and then manhandle and arrest one of the reporters. At no point in the video does that reporter appear to do anything to justify being arrested, or resist in anyway to justify the rough manner in which they treat him.

They also include this account from “AnimalNewYork.com” detailing the targeted arrests of people involved in three groups that organized a New York protest marking the one year anniversary of Eric Garner’s murder by the NYPD:

The largest demonstration took place Friday night, with more than 1,000 participants. Dozens were arrested. The rally and march was organized by Millions March NYC, NYC Shut It Down, and the People’s Power Assembly. Before the march made it three blocks, the NYPD arrested one prominent member from each of the three groups that organized the event, prompting calls from protesters that they were targeted for their role in organizing and not engaging in activity that other protesters were not.

In addition, there’s a link to a video that a Denver activist took during the Paul Castaway protests. It’s not entirely clear on the video, but it purports to show one of the actual “activist yearbooks,” as they are being dubbed, in use by a pair of police officers. All of this would very much be in line with the targeted arrests of “Black Lives Matter” organizers from Minneapolis that took place earlier this year, as well as historical Cointelpro operations engaged in by police and federal departments since the 50’s.

Freedom of the press and the ability for ordinary citizens to film the police and other government officials in public is a fundamental right and check on the ability of those officials to abuse their powers. Peaceful protests are also a protected civil right and defense against corruption and governmental abuses. These type of targeted arrests and physical attacks represent a huge threat to both those rights.

Breaking: Protests in Denver After Surveillance Video of Shooting Shows Police Lied

Paul Castaway Denver Police Protest

Paul Castaway Denver Police ShootingConflicting Accounts

Sunday night police in Denver shot a man after claiming he charged at them with a knife. Witnesses at the time disputed that claim. Now surveillance footage from a nearby business supports the witnesses over the police version. Instead of charging toward the officers, the video shows Paul Castaway holding the knife to his own throat the entire time.

Via Fox31 Denver:

Police shot and killed a man they say charged at them with a knife. But witnesses and surveillance video say otherwise.

The manager of Capital City mobile home park at 4501 W. Kentucky Ave. has the video. He wouldn’t give it to FOX31 Denver, but he did show it to reporter Tammy Vigil.

It shows Paul Castaway, 35, coming up from behind a white mobile home, through a black iron fence onto the street and around a wooden fence, which is a dead end.

He then turned back around onto the street with a knife to his neck the whole time, when an officer shoots him. The video seems to not match what police say happened.

Paul Cataway Protest DenverAdditionally, police originally claimed that Castaway had stabbed his mother and that she had been taken to the hospital with injuries as a result. They later revised that to him having threatened her and caused minor injuries to her neck.

Witnesses once again dispute that, stating she has no injuries at all. Rick Morado, Castaway’s cousin, contends that he was really just trying to get away and not attacking the police at all. As has often been the case in past police shootings, Castaway’s mother now says she regrets calling the police.

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Protests in Denver – “What’s Wrong With You Guys?”

Over the past few hours, after news of the inconsistencies in the surveillance footage spread, protests began in Denver. Many Native Americans, including Castaway’s own family, within the Denver area have gathered to protest recent killings of indigenous people by police and the lack of coverage of those murders by media. Paul Castaway and his family are members of the Lakota tribe.

Castaway’s purported last words to police, “What’s wrong with you guys,” have been used as a chant during the protest and as a hashtag on Twitter and other social media to spread news of the shooting. #PaulCastaway and #JusticeForPaul have also been trending among activist and police accountability groups on social media. Reportedly, at least one person has been arrested by Denver police during the protests.

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Is Awareness of Police Abuse Increasing?

The following post was shared with the CopBlock Network anonymously, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

If you have a video, personal story involving police misconduct and/or abuse, or commentary about a law enforcement related news story, we would be happy to have you submit it. You can find some advice on how to get your submission published on the CopBlock Network within this post.

I just moved to Denver, thousands of miles from my cop-critical social support network. With the exception of my partner, I no longer have people around me that will willingly accompany me in watching an endless stream of YouTube videos showing individuals refusing illegal searches at unconstitutional checkpoints, accounts of stop and frisk, or this awesome snake wielding legislation Jedi.

This lack of usual cohorts has led me to not only seek out others to fill the void, but has also led me to be much more aware of others’ perspectives of me, of my views and of my efforts to correct the egregiously fucked world around me. I’ve ultimately appreciated the increased context that this opportunity has afforded me, and I’ve learned a few things.

1. Not everyone sees things the way I do.

Of course, I’ve known this for quite sometime. I’ve long since come to accept my “radical” positions on political systemics, human nature, alternative transportation, and, of course, the corrosive and corruptive power of authority; especially when it’s given to sub-intelligent people that have a history of abusing their power. But, leaving all your Copblocking friends makes one re-realize their place within cultural opinions.

2. …but this is starting to change.

I’ve also had a chance to see a shift in the “average citizen’s” opinions of the police. I’ve noticed a sizable increase in more mainstream accounts of police abuse, outside of radically alternative media outlets, from “This American Life” radio narratives to Funny or Die’s “Cops: Ferguson” or The Daily Show’s poking fun at the FBI’s blatantly insufficient accounting of citizens killed by police. I’ve seen, through my Facebook feed, an anecdotal increase in cop-critical posts, from people that I would not have expected. That sorority girl that I knew in college hates cops now? Awesome.

Police Predator or ProtectorIt’s hard to find solid evidence that people’s views on police brutality are actually shifting, apart from some expensive social research or a superficial Google Trends search on the increased frequency of a search for “police brutality“. Opinions on this issue occupy a wide spectrum. On one side, the “radical” view that all cops are evil, that it’s the occupation that is corrupt, and that “good” cops are simply individuals who have not yet had the opportunity to show their congenital capacity to violate human rights; or have not yet been caught. On the other, one might accept that there are “bad apples” but that most police officers have the best interests of the community in mind. There’s also infinite variations of these perspectives within and around these two extremes. It makes it hard to conceptualize exactly what cop-critical attitudes even are let alone if more people have adopted them.

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Lately, I’ve had the opportunity to engage new people in a discourse that occupies a much wider area than within the community that I left when I moved. I’ve had some recent practice in how to talk about my views on the inhumane nature of police without scaring people away from my perspective, as it’s seen as subversive to someone that might just be starting to recognize the nature of the police but are still timid in voicing their opinions.

So, this is my call-to-action fellow Copblockers. Our movement is growing, and out of fear, police sympathizers will paint us as cop hating lunatics. We must all take on the responsibility of correcting that farce and showing others how righteous our philosophy is.

The American public is finally looking at the police and they haven’t been liking what they see. But they’re also looking at us.

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Denver PD Fires Officer for Excessive Force and Misconduct

This was submitted via the Cop Block Submissions page

Officer Medina Jail Cell BeatingDate of Incident: July 2014 (fired on 03/04/2015)
Department: Denver, CO PD – 1331 Cherokee St Denver, CO
Phone Number: (720) 913-6010
Officer Involved: James Medina

Denver, CO PD Officer James Medina was fired last Wednesday, because of an incident that took place in July, 2014, in which he is accused of using excessive force against Seyrina Trujillo. Medina had claimed Trujillo, who was arrested on July 10th for allegedly attempting to interfere when officials were taking her boyfriend into custody, had spit on another officer and kicked him in the face. He then proceeded to struggle with Trujillo in the holding cell. The camera shows him throwing her to the ground and choking her until she became unconscious.

According to video of what happened next, obtained by CBS4, when Officer Medina took Trujillo into a holding cell, he ordered her to remove her belt and shoes, but the woman did not immediately comply with the order.

When Trujillo continued to ask questions but did not surrender her shoes and belt, Medina engaged her in a physical struggle which was captured by a video camera in the cell. During the struggle, the officer can be heard numerous times telling Trujillo not to bite him.

Eventually Medina was able to pin Trujillo to a bench in the holding cell and he placed his right knee against her neck. When he got off Trujillo, the woman went limp and fell to the floor, apparently unconscious. She remained blacked out on the floor of the cell for several seconds before appearing to regain consciousness.

She received no medical attention and Medina did not report the incident.

With the announcement of James Medina’s termination, came word that Medina has obtained an attorney in order to file an appeal.

Read the Original Article Here…

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