Tag Archives: Dallas

Update: Half Naked, Drunk Texas Cop Who Fired Gun at Church Let Off With Probation

Deputy William Cox Texas Cop Naked Church Shooting Probation

Somervell County Sheriff’s Deputy William Cox was sentenced to just probation after getting drunk and shooting at a Texas Church.

In August of 2016 I posted about an off-duty Somervell County Sheriff’s Deputy who got sloppy drunk, stripped off most of his clothes and then drove over to a church in Ellis County, Texas and started shooting his gun into it.

Once local police arrived, former Deputy William Lane Cox readily admitted that he was drunk and had fired his gun(s) at the church, hitting the building several times. His confession, recorded on those officer’s body cams, included his admission that he had gotten drunk and decided to “blow off some steam” by shooting up the church, which was located within a residential neighborhood.

He also indicated that the reason for his “stress” was the shooting of several Dallas police officers in an incident that happened just prior to his own shooting spree. Among other racist comments Deputy Cox stated, “cause my boys are getting killed in Dallas” and “the black coon start killing my boys” on the video (embedded below).

Not surprisingly, after his initial arrest Deputy Cox received the typical Policeman’s Discount. The next day he was released without bail and shortly after that it was determined that he would not be facing any charges at all. That was partly due to the fact that the pastor of the church (who also just happens to be a police chaplain) didn’t want to press charges for the property damage caused by several bullets that had penetrated the doors and wall of the church.

Patrick Wilson Ellis County District Attorney Church Statement FavoritismHowever, there are numerous other charges that the police could easily have charged Deputy Cox with based on his own confession and the dangerous nature of his actions. Instead, while he was fired by the Somervell County Sheriff’s Office, Johnny Brown the Sheriff in Ellis County was pretty comfortable with not charging someone who admittedly drove drunk, recklessly discharged a gun while intoxicated, and put innocent people in danger by doing so at a building within a residential neighborhood with any crime whatsoever.

It wasn’t until six months later that Ellis County District Attorney Patrick Wilson launched a separate investigation and eventually charged him with “deadly conduct,” a class three felony. In doing so, Wilson stated the obvious: “it is very, very difficult for me to believe that this man, Mr. Cox, was not afforded some special consideration.

One would tend to think that any special consideration would end. However, as is always the case with police facing trial, that was far from true. In spite of facing a charge where the minimum sentence mandated by law is a two year prison sentence and the added circumstances of having been drinking (and driving) at the time, he still was offered a cushy plea deal based on him having been a “good citizen” prior to his drunken shooting spree. After pleading guilty, Cox was sentenced to just five years of probation a $1,500 fine and ten days in jail. BTW, he gets to serve those ten days on weekends, cuz you it would be a shame if he was inconvenienced.

Once again, I’m sure the average citizen would have gotten the same sort of treatment.

Leave a comment

False Imprisonment: Its Increasing Frequency and the Huge Cost It Imposes on Society

The following post was shared with the CopBlock Network anonymously by a reader, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

If you have a video, personal story involving police misconduct and/or abuse, or commentary about a law enforcement related news story, we would be happy to have you submit it. You can find some advice on how to get your submission published on the CopBlock Network within this post.

Police Abuses on the Rise

It’s no secret that police brutality and misconduct has been on the rise recently with cases in the news like Eric Garner who was suffocated in a choke hold by police and killed for illegally selling cigarettes. Similarly, a 12-year-old boy Tamir Rice was shot and killed after playing with a toy gun in the park. The level of uneasiness between police officers and citizens has hit an all-time high and we see this unrest play out in society. Police brutality is not the only form of police misconduct- false arrest of citizens can be an excruciating experience that sends innocent people to prison for simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

For example, Chicago’s taxpayers have had to pay over $120 million for the racial torture committed by one police commander, Jon Burge. Part of the disconnect between officers and citizens is the unfairness in power and how that power is used. To add on to this, police are offered different treatment when it comes to false arrests or misconduct. Although Burge oversaw the torture of over 118 black men – which would typically lead to decades in prison – he was released in three-and-a-half years and sent to a halfway house. All the men he tortured remain behind bars.

Police officers were granted a Qualified Immunity Doctrine by the Supreme Court which essentially states that police officers are innocent of harm towards their suspects in most cases due to their risky and honorable line of work. The best intentions are seen to be associated with most police officers, but has that been the case recently?

Typically, false arrest from police officers falls into the police misconduct category, which can also encompass police brutality and wrongful death. According to the University of Michigan Law School’s National Registry of Exonerations report, 75% of homicide exonerations involved police misconduct. One widely publicized example of a wrongful arrest was James Bain, who was convicted of kidnapping and rape at the age of 18. He served 35 years for a vicious crime he did not commit. Although DNA evidence was tested and presented prior, he was refused further DNA testing from the courts until his fifth try in 2006. Although misidentification from eyewitnesses account for 75% of all convictions that are overturned by DNA evidence, Bain was wrongfully arrested and incarcerated by police.

Click the banner to submit content to CopBlock.org

Click the banner to submit content to CopBlock.org

How Does False Imprisonment Affect the Public?

Some people may think that the police arrest people who they think are guilty of a crime, and if they are wrongfully arrested, they are quickly released and go about their happy lives. That is far from the truth in most cases where the arrest was outright wrong and unlawful. Many people who are falsely arrested fight back and sue the police officer who wronged them and because of this, the public is responsible for paying that fee.

Amount of Money City Taxpayers Have Paid for Police Misconduct:

  • Chicago: $521 million from 2004-2014
  • Cleveland: $8.2 million between 2004-2014
  • Denver: $12 million since 2011
  • Dallas: $6.6 million between 2011-2014
  • Los Angeles: $101 million between 2002-2011

For example, Robert Graham was arrested for disorderly conduct by a police officer who was stuck in traffic behind him. Due to the gridlock traffic in New York City, Graham was also stuck in traffic and unable to move. The police officers wrongfully arrested Graham due to the circumstances of the situation. Graham’s wrongfully arrested cases was one of the ones that contributed to New York taxpayers paying $18 million to pay back people who were wrongfully arrested by officers.

According to Jon Norinsberg, a false imprisonment attorney, New York city police may only legally arrest citizens if:

  1. The police have an arrest warrant.
  2. The police have probable cause that you committed a crime.
  3. You are interfering with a police investigation or arrest.
  4. The police believe you are a criminal attempting to flee a crime scene.

Why are Police Officers Getting Away with False Imprisonment?

The number of innocent people behind bars is the highest number it has ever been historically, so it is only natural to question the source – the police. Why has it become okay to so quickly convict people and rarely face punishment as a police officer for wrongfully arresting someone? The issue gets stickier when videos of police officers using excessive force and even killing citizens when they appeared to pose no threat. Are there consequences for that? Rarely.

Unfortunately, false arrests happen and can be scary to argue your case in front of a judge – especially because police are most often shielded by the Qualified Immunity Doctrine exercised by the Supreme Court. This is a protective order that is designed to protect police officers from facing punishments from their mistakes or unlawful actions. In theory, this Qualified Immunity Doctrine was originally designed to shield officers who are properly bringing justice to criminals and who handle situations appropriately – if someone is upset for getting arrested if they deserve it, well this doctrine will protect the police from this potential complaint or lawsuit. Since videos have been released of police officers using unnecessary excessive force on unarmed people, citizens are growing scared that officers are abusing this immunity from the Supreme Court to get away with their unjust behavior. This is where a disconnect lies between police officers and citizens.

Where is the Accountability From the Police?

Why is it that as a society we only started paying attention to police misconduct and false arrests when Netflix featured programs like Making a Murderer?

Police officers are designed to keep our communities safe. While most cops are heroes and upstanding citizens who work hard to protect our safety, those who entered the police force to unlawfully assert power over others and take advantage of their badge are getting more press in recent news. Although it’s an unfortunate circumstance, it is important to stay educated on what is happening in society to better educate yourself and to hopefully make a positive change.

Leave a comment

Dallas Police Manufacture an Excuse to Harass and Attempt to Question Man Legally Filming in Public

The following post was shared with the CopBlock Network by Patrick Roth of CopBlock Oklahoma, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. (See “related posts” section below for previous submissions from Patrick.)

In this video, as the name of the post implies, Patrick was legally filming in public at the headquarters of the Dallas Police Department. As he does so, two Dallas police officers arrive and approach. Shortly after walking up to Patrick, those officers stated that they had received a call about him and where just checking to see if he was alright. However, within the description below Patrick maintains that no such call was made and that this was just an excuse they were using to justify attempting to question him (which is not an unusual tactic among cops conducting fishing trips).

For the vast majority of the encounter Patrick remains silent, invoking his Fifth Amendment right and refusing to speak to the officers. After a minute or so of awkward silence, the cops give up and head back to their car. One of the officers readily admits that filming in public is legal and the harassment is actually fairly minimal. Once they have driven away, Patrick returns his attention to filming the headquarters building and everyone seemingly lives happily ever after.

If you have a video, personal story involving police misconduct and/or abuse, or commentary about a law enforcement related news story, we would be happy to have you submit it. You can find some advice on how to get your submission published on the CopBlock Network within this post.

Click the banner to submit content to CopBlock.org

Click the banner to submit content to CopBlock.org

Date of Incident: December 17, 2016
Department Involved: Dallas Police Department
Department Facebook Page: Dallas PD
Department Twitter Account: @DallasPD
Department YouTube Channel: Dallas Police Dept.
Department Phone No.: (214) 671-3001

I was doing some public filming at the Dallas Police Department when two officers approached me wanting to know what I was doing and illegally claiming they got a police call. I actually found out later that there was no police call and I reported both of them. So, they had no authority to come up to me and question why I was filming. They also didn’t respect me remaining silent and it obviously bothered them.

– Patrick Roth
Copblock Oklahoma

Related Posts:

Leave a comment

Dallas Police Officer Caught On Video Granting Badges Extra Rights

The following post was shared with the CopBlock Network by Patrick Roth of CopBlock Oklahoma, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. (See “related posts” section below for previous submissions from Patrick.)

In this video, Patrick goes down to the Dallas Police Department employee parking area and observes that several vehicles owned by officers don’t have front license plates, including one that doesn’t have one on either the front of back. The reason he states that he is doing so is because he recently got a citation for not having a front license plate and wants to highlight the hypocrisy of the police not enforcing those same laws on the officers working for the department.

As he is walking around filming, a police officer (who Patrick forgot to ask for a name) pulls into the parking lot. Patrick approaches that officer and begins to ask him about why he isn’t enforcing the same law regarding front license plates that was cited for against the cops who own these cars. After a bit of back and forth about the lifesaving importance of flashlights to cops and Patrick’s concerns that he might be assaulted with it, the officer uses the excuse that none of the vehicles in the Dallas Police Department parking lot are moving and therefore aren’t currently breaking the law.

Almost on cue, as the officer is stating that, the engine of the SUV, which has no plates at all, starts up and the Good Cop inside it begins driving out of the parking lot. So, of course the officer Patrick had been speaking to, along with a second officer that had pulled in behind him, went over and ticketed the unregistered SUV now that it was “in motion.” Right?

(SPOILER – Not a chance.)

If you have a video, personal story involving police misconduct and/or abuse, or commentary about a law enforcement related news story, we would be happy to have you submit it. You can find some advice on how to get your submission published on the CopBlock Network within this post.

Click the banner to submit content to CopBlock.org

Click the banner to submit content to CopBlock.org

Date of Incident: December 28, 2016
Department Involved: Dallas Police Department
Department Facebook Page: Dallas PD
Department Twitter Account: @DallasPD
Department YouTube Channel: Dallas Police Dept.
Department Phone No.: (214) 671-3001

I had a concern about why I got a ticket for not having a front license plate recently and wanted to talk to a Dallas police officer about why he didn’t give vehicles that belong to officers tickets for the same offense that I was ticketed for. While I was in the process of filming him, a vehicle with no front or back license plate pulled out of the police parking lot and drove off in front of him. He did nothing because it was another officer, but if it was a citizen like me or you they would pull us over in a heartbeat and suspect you’ve got a bomb in the back. Even if the cops didn’t have a bomb in the back, it’s still illegal to drive without plates.

– Patrick Roth
CopBlock Oklahoma

On this video, I exposed these criminals for:

  1. Not doing their job
    – and –
  2. Giving cops special treatment, thereby granting them extra rights – Badges Don’t Grant Extra Rights

Related Posts:

Leave a comment

Garland Texas Cop on Trial for Shooting Unarmed Motorist 41 Times After High Speed Chase

Officer Patrick Tuter began trial on Tuesday for fatally shooting a man during a high-speed chase in 2012. Tuter shot at Michael Allen 41 times. Defense lawyers representing Tuter are using the go-to excuse for cops that murder people of “I feared for my life.” He initially claimed that he had to shoot him because Allen rammed his truck into Tuter’s car. However, dashcam video showed that it was Tuter who ran into Allen.

Tuter also claimed that Allen was reaching down for something. Garland Officer William Norris contradicted that contention in his testimony, stating that Tuter was “reckless” in his actions and put the rest of the cops involved in the chase in danger with his gunfire. Other officers at the scene also testified that Allen had his hands on the steering wheel at the time Officer Tuter began shooting at him. In spite of the amount of shots Tuter fired at an unarmed person and the lies in his story exposed by both video and other police officers, Tuter was only charged with manslaughter.

Via WFAA.com, the Dallas ABC affiliate:

It all started when Patrick Tuter, a six-year veteran of the force at the time, recognized Michael Allen’s truck from another police chase earlier that week. He tried to pull him over, which led to a chase through multiple cities, ultimately ending in gunfire.

Prosecutors called Tuter “reckless,” saying that seasoned officers will testify he went beyond what was necessary. Allen didn’t have a weapon in the vehicle.

“He went past Garland’s way of taking care of things and went to Patrick Tuter’s way of taking car of things,” said prosecutor Juan Sanchez.

Tuter was fired after an internal investigation.

But defense attorney Robert Rogers said Tuter feared he would die if he didn’t use deadly force, painting Allen as a dangerous felon who had meth in his system.

Allen’s mother, Stephanie, was the first to take the stand Tuesday, tearfully remembering the day she learned her son had died.

“We were … devastated,” she said,”

Then, Lt. Clay Lacey, of Texas DPS, took the stand. He was in the DPS chopper the night of the chase and answered questions about chopper surveillance video. He estimated the chase topped 80 to 100 mph at some points.

Ultimately, Allen wound up in a Mesquite cul-de-sac, with Tuter on his tail, and multiple other police vehicles behind them.
garland-police-shooting-surveillance-footageThe two vehicles collided and ended up front to front. A second police vehicle then struck Allen’s truck, sandwiching him in. The surveillance video appears to show Allen continue to accelerate.

Defense attorneys say Allen bent down to reach for something and that’s when Tuter feared for his life and fired shots. They said he fired until Allen stopped accelerating and the threat was over.

“He had to do what he had to do in order to survive,” Rogers said.

But prosecutors argue Allen had his hands on the wheel and was trying to leave.

Leave a comment