Tag Archives: civil lawsuit

After Virginia Police Raid Wrong Address Innocent College Student Was Beaten, Arrested, and Evicted From Home

Maurice Neblett Police Raid Wrong House Cause Eviction

After Virginia police raided the wrong address, innocent Virginia Union University student Maurice Neblett was beaten, falsely arrested, and evicted from his apartment.

Note: This post is based on a a reader submission shared with Nevada Cop Block by Maurice Neblett. If you have videos, stories, upcoming events/protests, or personal interactions with the police (and/or “justice” system) that you would like to share, send them to us and we will do everything we can to bring it to the attention of the world.

In addition, you can visit the Nevada Cop Block resources section for information and links to the rights of citizens when dealing with police, during which you should always be filming.

(Several quotes used below were taken from a previous article on this incident by Amelia Heymann, a contributing writer at the Commonwealth Times, which is the student newspaper for Virginia Union University.)

During a February 2014 police raid, Maurice Neblett, who was naked at the time, was pulled out of bed, beaten by as many as a dozen policemen, and then falsely arrested. He was punched, kicked, and further battered with flashlights, rifle butts, and other objects in a beating that went on for at least five minutes.

Eventually, he was placed in a choke-hold and then handcuffed. While handcuffed, one of the officers involved began verbally taunting him. That officer, Richmond Police Officer Mark Sims, reportedly whispered in his ear, “Who has the most power, us or the Bloods?” and “We should have done this to your brother, but it does not matter because he will be gone for a very long time. You will too.”

Neblett’s address at the time was 531 W. Bacon St. in Richmond, Va. The address on their warrant was “Building Two, Apartment 2120 at 610 W. Bacon St.” Not only were police at the wrong address, the address listed on their warrant doesn’t actually exist. Even if it had been a legitimate address the corresponding number would be a block away.

Further complicating the story is the fact that the two officers who obtained the warrant claimed they had conducted a 30 day investigation after they “smelled marijuana in the area.” No drugs, or anything else illegal, were found during the raid. Nor was any evidence of  illegal activity by Neblett or anyone at his address ever found. The only charges filed against him, two felonies for “assaulting an officer,” were later dropped.

No connection to the Bloods, the street gang referenced by Sims while they were beating Neblett, has ever been established. Neblett has also continuously maintained that he had offered no resistance to justify the force used against him. Neblett claims the officers discussed who would among them would like to volunteer to “be an assaultee.”

Being released from jail and having the charges eventually dropped wasn’t the end of the disruption that the Richmond Police Department’s actions that night caused for Neblett, though. Because he was initially charged with a federal crime, Neblett was evicted from his apartment. He ended up homeless as a result, living out of his car for several months.

In addition, he states that he suffers daily from anxiety, post-traumatic stress, loss of sleep and “a profound and insurmountable loss of trust in the state, the city and their law enforcement officials.” Neblett is a criminal justice major at Virginia Union University and obviously this raid and its aftermath greatly affected his studies.

“I’m still in disbelief,” Neblett says. “I’m trying to figure out if I’m in a nightmare.”

However, Neblett isn’t just focusing on what happened to him and his own problems as a result he has filed a lawsuit against the Richmond Police Department and hopes the lawsuit can not only find justice for him but also can lead to changes in policy within the department that would prevent raids such as this from happening in the future.

“I’m here, I’m breathing, a lot of people that have been in similar situations aren’t here today,” Neblett says.”This is bigger than me, I’m just a grain of salt.”

Also, regardless of whether or how the fact he is a black man may have influenced the actions of the police who raided his house, Neblett maintains that this should be viewed as an issue which is bigger than just a potential race-based incident:

“This is not a color bearing issue,” Neblett says. “It is important we support this because it could happen to anyone. We have to address again that no one is above the law and they have to be held accountable for their actions”

As noted above, Maurice Neblett has filed a lawsuit against the Richmond Police. Obviously, regardless of the eventual outcome lawsuits and everything that goes into filing them can be very expensive. That’s one of the reasons the police and governments choose the targets that they do. If you can’t afford to fight them in court, then they often get away with even the most egregious abuses.

Neblett has asked us to share a link to a page he set up to help offset the costs of lawyers and other expenses involved in pursuing justice in this case. If you are able to, you can donate by clicking this link to his GoFundMe account. Even if you can’t help financially, you can help him by sharing that link to others.

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Update: Two Deputies Acquitted of Manslaughter in Murder of Matthew Ajibade; Guilty on Lesser Charges

Two deputies that were charged with involuntary manslaughter in the killing a 21 year old Nigerian college student in Savannah Georgia were acquitted of those charges on Friday. However, they both found guilty of lesser charges. Former Deputy Jason Kenny was found guilty of cruelty to an inmate, while Former Deputy Maxine Evans was found guilty of public records fraud and three counts of perjury. Evans had falsified a restraint chair log and then lied about it during grand jury testimony in an effort to cover up for Kenny. In addition, Greg Brown, former nurse, was also acquitted of manslaughter, but guilty of making a false statement.

As reported earlier on CopBlock.org, Matthew Ajibade, who suffered from bipolar disorder and was deprived of his medication while in the Chatham County Jail, was tasered and beaten to death while strapped into a restraint chair and unable to defend himself in any way on New Years day of last year. In all, nine deputies were fired as a result of his murder. (See videos below.)

Via PressTV.ir:

“I am not surprised by the verdict,” said Ajibade’s cousin Chris Oladapo, who attended the trial and gave a statement through his family’s attorney.

Matthew Ajibade

“I knew that that same system that failed Matthew would not be the system that got him justice,” he said.According to a separate civil lawsuit lodged by Ajibade’s family, the incident began on Jan. 1 when Ajibade was having a manic episode caused by his bipolar disorder.

His girlfriend called police for help and told them what was happening, the suit said, adding she gave officers a bottle of Ajibade’s medicine to give to the student.

However, they arrested him and put him in restraints in a cell, alleging that he committed domestic offences (sic), including battery and resisting arrest. He was later found unresponsive and pronounced dead at the jail.

Police brutality is rife in the US and in recent months numerous protests have been held across several American cities over police maltreatment of people, in particular, African Americans.

Police mistreatment and outright murder of mentally ill people has been a problem for sometime and has been an increasingly deadly prospect for those who call the police requesting help with friends or relatives that are experiencing episodes related to mental illness.

Lawsuit Claims Las Vegas Police Officer Pulled Down Woman’s Pants, Exposed Himself On Domestic Call

Las Vegas Police Sexual Assault Soloman Coleman

A federal lawsuit alleges a “lewd and disgusting” Las Vegas police officer pulled down a woman’s pants, photographed her, and then exposed himself.

A lawsuit filed in federal court on May 27 alleges a “lewd and disgusting” Las Vegas police officer pulled down a woman’s pants, photographed her, and then exposed himself.

Sasha Boseke says she called the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department on June 1, 2013, after a “domestic incident” with her boyfriend, who assaulted her. The boyfriend was arrested.

The lawsuit claims that after a female officer had already taken photos of her injuries, Officer Solomon Coleman waited until all other officers left, and followed Boseke to her bedroom where he told her to pull down her shorts so he could see her bruises.

When Boseke “refused to expose her body,” Coleman “forcefully pulled down [her] shorts and undergarments, and, further, told [her] to lean over her bed, which exposed her nude body” the lawsuit says.

While bent over her bed, nude from the waist down, “Coleman took photographs of [Boseke’s] nude body with a cell phone camera,” without her consent and then “exposed his penis to [her] and made lewd and vile remarks.”

“At no time did [Boseke] consent in any manner to the lewd and disgusting conduct of Coleman, nor did [she] engage in any consensual sexual activity with defendant Coleman,” the lawsuit states.

Boseke says Coleman told her, “he had to leave but that he would return that evening.” When the officer did in fact return, Boseke refused to let him in, and called the police to report him.

An internal police investigation into the incident found that, according to his activity log, Coleman remained at Boseke’s apartment for 36 minutes after all of the other officers had left.

After pictures and other materials showing the covert filming of sex acts were found on Coleman’s phone, he was indicted by a grand jury and charged with two counts of oppression under color of office, two counts of open or gross lewdness, indecent exposure, and capturing an image of the private area of another person – all misdemeanors.

Coleman, who no longer works for the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, is scheduled for criminal trial on June 29.

In the federal lawsuit, Boseke is seeking punitive damages for assault and battery, emotional distress, civil rights violations and negligence.

Las Vegas police have refused to comment on “pending litigation.”

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