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Second Body Cam Video of Baltimore Police Planting Drugs Then “Finding” Them Has Surfaced

Baltimore Police Department Planting Drugs Video

For the second time in a matter of weeks, body camera footage has been released showing officers from the Baltimore Police Department planting drugs. In both videos, the planting of that evidence was exposed by a feature of the body cams that causes them to begin saving video thirty seconds prior to the point where they are manually activated. This video is from November 2016, while the earlier one dates from January of this year.

In this latest video to surface, police were conducting a traffic stop in which they were profiling drivers in an effort to make drug arrests. After claiming to have seen the passenger in Shamere Collins’ vehicle making a drug sale, the police stopped them. However, after a thorough search, no drugs were found anywhere in the car.

The body cam video of that initial search includes audio of one officer stating that there would be “negative consequences” if they didn’t find drugs and thereby couldn’t arrest someone. After that, the cops for no apparent reason all turned their body cameras off.

What followed, according to CBS News.com:

When the cameras come back on, an officer is seen squatting by the driver’s side of the suspect’s car, apparently unaware that he’s being recorded.

He then stands up and steps back. About 30 seconds pass, and another officer approaches the car, then squats down and pulls out a bag of drugs.

Although the charges were thrown out once the public defender representing her got ahold of this video, Collins and her boyfriend, who was the passenger were charged with possession of opiates and marijuana, as a result. According to Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby, dozens more cases that involve this group of officers could also be thrown out.

Meanwhile, Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis maintained that this is no reason for the public to “jump to conclusions” or make “heavy allegations” about police misconduct based on the video. Because concluding that something suspicious was going on after all the cops turned their cameras off right after one of them expressed concerns about getting in trouble if they didn’t find any drugs to justify an arrest, then video (that the cops didn’t expect to be recorded) showing one cop crouching next to the car, followed by body cam video (that they did expect to be recorded) of a different cop easily finding drugs in that same area after it had already been thoroughly searched is quite a jump.

Of course, this also comes on the heals of the previously released video (embedded below), which is even more damning. In that video, Officer Richard Pinheiro can be clearly seen putting a bag inside a can on a pile of debris in an alley. He then walks back out to the street, accompanied by two other officers who have not been named.

After activating the camera, he proceeds to walk back down the alley as one of the unnamed officers can be heard laughing behind him. Miraculously, he manages to quickly zero in on the can shortly after searching through the debris pile. He then pulls out the bag that he unwittingly recorded himself planting to reveal that it is filled with pills.

The man who was arrested as a result spent over seven months in jail awaiting trial before this video was made public and his charges were thrown out. So far, thirty-four other cases have also been thrown out and as many as fifty-five more could be, as well. Officer Pinheiro was (only) suspended for his actions, while the two other officers that watched (and laughed) as he planted evidence have received no punishment at all.

Not Isolated Incidents

These incidents don’t represent the only times that the Baltimore police have been under scrutiny for manufacturing evidence and manipulating body cameras. In March, all seven members of an “elite task force” that targets illegal weapons and drug crimes were indicted on racketeering charges for robberies that included completely innocent people of cash and filing false paperwork to get paid for overtime they didn’t actually work. In the process, they also falsified search warrants to justify detentions and traffic stops against their intended targets. As they were performing these “shake downs,” officers were known to have turned off their body cameras.

Nor is this the first confirmed instance of body camera footage being falsified to show police finding evidence against suspects. In May of this year, charges were dropped against a man in Colorado after a cop in Pueblo admitted he staged a video of himself  finding heroin and a gun in his car. In that case, Officer Seth Jensen claimed that he was merely “reenacting” his legitimate discovery of the evidence.

An “Unintended Consequence” of Transparency?

Given all of that, it’s rather interesting that in the CBS News video embedded below (beginning at about 3:45) correspondent Jeff Pegues characterizes the issue as a “downside of video transparency” and an “unintended consequence” of police wearing body cameras. Apparently, on his planet these type of incidents aren’t an argument for increased scrutiny and transparency, but rather a problem for “police departments that have to defend themselves against this type of policing.”

Obviously, I can’t see any reason we shouldn’t just trust these cops and accept their word. It would be crazy if cops didn’t have the ability to freely plant evidence without being detected and police departments had no incentive to eliminate “this type of policing.” That freedom to just arrest whoever they want and make up a reason undoubtedly would make their tough jobs so much easier.

Watch him throw it into the floorboards

BPD Officer Richard Pinheiro planting drugs

CBS News coverage of  the latest incident:

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Seven Baltimore Police Officers Arrested on Multiple Federal Charges in Racketeering Indictment

Baltimore Gun Task Force Racketeering Indictments

Yesterday, seven cops from the Baltimore Police Department were charged with multiple federal crimes in a racketeering indictment. Sgt. Wayne Jenkins and Detectives Momodu Gondo, Evodio Hendrix, Daniel Hersl, Jemell Rayam, Marcus Taylor, and Maurice Ward were all accused of “shaking down citizens” for cash, as well as filing false court paperwork and making fraudulent overtime claims. All seven were part of the “Gun Trace Task Force,” which worked to remove illegal guns from the streets in Baltimore.

In addition, Det. Gondo was also indicted on drug charges with five other people that are not police officers. That indictment included using inside information to tip off drug dealers regarding BPD investigations. Gondo was also accused of being directly involved in the drug operation itself.

The crimes were uncovered in the process of an ongoing probe by the FBI into a pattern of civil rights abuses perpetrated by members of the Baltimore police. That probe was initiated after attention was focused on the city by the murder of Freddie Gray in April of 2015 and the subsequent riots.

Via the Baltimore Sun:

(United States Attorney Rod J.) Rosenstein accused the officers of participating in “a pernicious conspiracy scheme” that “tarnishes the reputation of all police officers.”

“These defendants were allegedly involved in stopping people who had not committed crimes, and not only seizing money but pocketing it,” he said. “These are really robberies by people wearing police uniforms.”

All seven officers appeared in handcuffs and street clothes for initial hearings in U.S. District Court in downtown Baltimore on Wednesday afternoon. Each was represented by a court-appointed attorney. Each affirmed he understood the charges against him.

All of the officers were ordered held pending detention hearings. Hearings for Gondo, Hendrix, Hersl, Jenkins, Rayam, and Ward were scheduled for Thursday. A hearing for Taylor was scheduled for Friday.

Prosecutors and the officers’ attorneys will argue at those hearings about whether the officers should be released before their trials.

Family members of several officers were in the courtroom and voiced their support and love before the officers were taken away. Family members declined to comment.

Defense attorneys for the officers said they were still getting acquainted with the allegations in the indictment.

Police union President Gene S. Ryan said union officials were “very disturbed” by the charges against its members.

“These officers are entitled to due process and a fair trial in accordance with the Constitution and the laws of our state,” Ryan said in a statement. “It would be inappropriate for me to make any further comment until the charges leveled against these officers are finally resolved.”

Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby said the involvement of federal authorities “confirms the inherent difficulties with the BPD investigating itself,” and warned the indictment would have “pervasive implications on numerous active investigations and pending cases.”

Her office was not involved in the investigation, and was not informed of it until Wednesday morning…

Some of the officers have long been accused of using excessive force or of other wrongdoing. The city has paid out more than $500,000 in settlements in cases involving the officers, according to a review by The Baltimore Sun.

Members of the city’s state legislative delegation called for a federal investigation into Rayam in 2009 after he was involved in three shootings over the course of two years. The city has settled multiple lawsuits involving Hersl.

“The majority of these officers have been known to my attorneys as having significant credibility issues,” Baltimore Deputy Public Defender Natalie Finegar said. “We have aggressively been pursuing personnel records to be able to highlight the issues with their credibility on the force.”

Rosenstein said federal prosecutors quietly dropped five cases involving the Gun Trace Task Force while the officers were being investigated.

As recently as October, the Police Department was praising the unit in an internal newsletter for its work getting guns off the streets. The unit made more than 110 gun arrests in less than 11 months last year…

In one incident in September, federal prosecutors said in court papers, the officers stopped an individual leaving a storage facility and said they had a warrant to search his storage unit. They did not, authorities said. Hersl, Jenkins and Rayam then took a sock containing $4,800 and removed $2,000, prosecutors said.

Rayam was recorded telling Gondo that he had “taxed” the man, prosecutors said.

“He won’t say nothing,” Rayam was recorded saying, according to prosecutors.

A month earlier, prosecutors said, officers pulled a man over, detained him and took drugs and $1,700 from him. No incident report was prepared regarding the stop, prosecutors said.

In another incident in July 2016, prosecutors said, they stole $70,000 and divided the money up.

Prosecutors said the officers alerted each other to potential investigations into their activities, coached each other to give false testimony to internal affairs investigators, and turned off their body cameras to avoid recording their encounters.

The criminal activity occurred throughout 2016, prosecutors said. The Justice Department was investigating the department for much of the year.

Justice Department investigators reported that the department routinely violated individuals’ constitutional rights by conducting unlawful stops and using excessive force, among other problems. They concluded that those practices overwhelmingly affected residents of poor, predominantly black neighborhoods.

The Justice Department and the city agreed to terms of a consent decree in January outlining sweeping reforms to the department. That agreement awaits approval by a federal judge.

“We wouldn’t be under a consent decree if we didn’t have issues,” Davis said. “We have issues.”

Meanwhile, the officers’ work was celebrated by the department. Lt. Chris O’Ree wrote in October that the seizure of 132 guns in less than 11 months was “no small task.”

“Their relentless pursuit to make our streets safer by removing guns and arresting the right people for the right reasons has made our City safer,” O’Ree wrote.

Prosecutors also said the officers filed for overtime they didn’t work. On one day in July 2016, prosecutors said, one of the officers told another about being in the poker room at the Maryland Live Casino in Anne Arundel County. The second officer said he was going to get a drink, prosecutors said. Both filed for overtime that day, prosecutors said.

Jenkins nearly doubled his annual salary of $85,400 with $83,300 in overtime in 2016, prosecutors said. Hersl was paid $66,600 in overtime on top of a base salary of $77,600. Taylor made an extra $56,200 on top of his $66,800 salary.

There’s several things that are interesting about this case. One is the fact that, just several months ago the Baltimore Police Department, who was not informed of the investigation until the indictments were ready to be filed, was praising the great work of these same officers. Despite that praise, even before these indictments, several of them already had a history of misconduct complaints, including allegations of violence.

Beyond that, the very nature of the case involves a bit of irony in the characterization of the crimes committed. In his speech while announcing the indictment, Rosenstein described what they were accused of this way: “These defendants were allegedly involved in stopping people who had not committed crimes, and not only seizing money but pocketing it. These are really robberies by people wearing police uniforms.”

Of course, if they had limited themselves to finding an excuse to stop drivers out on the highway, oftentimes whose only “crime” is having out of state license plates, then they could have legally and without any recourse taken whatever cash those drivers had on them. Such cash seizures require no conviction or even so much as the filing of criminal charges. In reality, you could say that the only difference between what they did and drug forfeiture laws was the part about them personally pocketing the money.

In fact, in essence the only real difference between the officially sanctioned robberies by people wearing Magic Uniforms and the ones these guys will eventually be given probation and/or community service for was that they didn’t give the government its cut of the profits from their self described “taxation.”

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Boston Police Sgt’s Defense: My Penis Probably Wasn’t The First One 16 Year Old Girl Saw

Kenneth Anderson, the lawyer for Boston Police Sergeant Edwin Guzman, stated earlier this week that it was okay if his client sent a sixteen year old girl pictures of his penis because: “You can’t tell me someone her age has never seen a picture of a penis on the Internet.” It’s an interesting albeit not very convincing defense to say the least for Sgt. Guzman, who’s facing charges of “annoying and accosting a person of the opposite sex” and “disseminating harmful material to a minor,” but apparently is in talks with prosecutors to resolve the case. It’s not clear what exactly that means, but as you can see below, it probably means Guzman’s gonna have to ice down a sore wrist at some point in the near future.

Via : (Watch the report here)

Sgt. Edwin Guzman is accused of sending sexually explicit Facebook messages to a minor.

Guzman was promoted to sergeant in August 2014, around the same time he allegedly sent the messages to the teenager who says she considered Guzman a family friend and father figure.

“It started off we regularly chat and it’s mostly about school and how life is,” the teenager who was 16 at the time told 5 Investigates’ Mike Beaudet.

But she says the conversations kept escalating from there.

“If I gave him like pleasure and let him do things to me, he’d be willing to buy me things,” she said. “He took a picture of his penis and he sent it to me.”

Guzman was charged in Quincy District Court with sending obscene matter to a minor and accosting and annoying a person of the opposite sex.

The Norfolk District Attorney’s office has confirmed the charges were based on the allegedly explicit messages and picture.

But nearly two years later we’ve learned the more serious charge of sending obscene matter to a minor is expected to be dropped, a charge that carried a potential prison sentence of up to five years.

While officials say they believe the alleged victim’s story and they have the deleted Facebook messages, they’ve been unable to recover the naked photo.

The alleged victim’s mother is upset the case has dragged on for so long, culminating in this setback.

“I think the system’s screwed up,” she said. “I still feel like he came out winning.”

The alleged victim’s mother says the district attorney’s office has told her Guzman had indicated he would plead guilty to the lesser charge, if he avoids jail time so the family is willing to go along, rather than risk a jury finding him not guilty.

“I’d rather have him plead guilty on his own and say he’s guilty of one thing,” said the mother of the alleged victim.

“Do you think this is justice?” asked 5 Investigates’ Beaudet.

“Not at all. It’s a slap on the wrist,” she replied.

Guzman is due in court Friday morning. His lawyer wouldn’t comment on whether a plea deal could be reached by then.

Boston police tell us their internal investigators are monitoring the case and will begin an investigation which will ultimately decide if he gets to keep his job, once the criminal case is resolved.

For now, Guzman remains on paid administrative leave.

That paid vacation Sgt. Guzman has been on has lasted for just under a year and a half. That’s a nice bonus for the former Boston Police Department officer of the year (2012).

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Newly Released Video Shows Baltimore Police Lied About 2013 Shooting

A video that was just released as part of a lawsuit by a man the Baltimore Police shot in January 2013 contradicts the claims the officers involved made to justify that shooting. In their official report, those officers claimed that Shaun Mouzon tried to run them over with his car and that they were forced to shoot him in self defense.

Instead the video shows that Mouzon was stopped in traffic with cars in front of him when they pulled up behind him. Contrary to their statements, they were never in front of his car and it never moved until after he was shot. In addition, the police report claimed that they saw a gun in his waistband and Mouzon was charged with possession of a handgun, even  though no handgun was ever found on him or in his vehicle.

Via wbaltv.com:

(Baltimore attorney A. Dwight) Pettit gave 11 News access to the surveillance video of what happened when police stopped his client, Shaun Mouzon, on Jan. 28, 2013, in southwest Baltimore.

Pettit is suing five Baltimore City police officers, former Commissioners Anthony Batts and Fred Bealefeld, and the mayor and City Council for violating Mouzon’s rights, illegal seizure, assault and battery.

“You have not only the horror of the shooting and attempted murder, but then you have the horror of a fabrication of police reports to cover themselves,” Pettit said.

Officer Fabien Laronde wrote the report. He has been the subject of numerous 11 News I-Team investigations and misconduct complaints filed by residents. The city has settled some lawsuits against Laronde for more than $175,000.

This month, 20 defense attorneys asked the Police Department for Laronde’s Internal Affairs records, questioning his credibility.

“They knew at least one of these officers had a history as a bad actor and nothing was ever done against him,” Pettit said.

Laronde’s report said he observed what he believed to be the handle of a handgun in Mouzon’s waistband. Mouzon noticed the police presence and got into his car. The video shows Mouzon turn onto Edmonson Avenue and get stopped in traffic.

Laronde’s report said “Mr. Mouzon let off the brakes and began to accelerate towards the officers in front of the vehicle. At this time, a police-involved shooting occurred.”

“His car is stationary, blocked in traffic, it’s not moving. The officers walk up into the rear and to the side, and then you see the muzzle flashes, you see the officers open fire,” Pettit said.

The officers shot Mouzon 14 times in the head, chest and groin, according to his attorneys. The video shows him trying to navigate his vehicle away afterward before crashing. The police report said he fled the scene.

Mouzon was charged with several traffic violations and possession of a handgun. Pettit said his client was searched and no weapon was found on him or in his car. Eventually, the charges were dropped.

Pettit has filed the case in federal court.

As mentioned in the quote, Officer Fabien Laronde, who wrote the report, has a long history of abuse and misconduct during his illustrious career with the Baltimore City Police Department. Currently, he’s on (paid) leave after a incident in which a 7-11 called to report an armed man causing a disturbance in the store. That armed man turned out to be Officer Laronde. He’s also been banned from the Baltimore Municipal Courthouse after he was caught filming a witness with his cellphone during a trial.

And that’s not even the half of it:

It’s not the first time the city Police Department has investigated complaints about Laronde. He has been with the department for 14 years. His paper trail stretches from City Hall to the federal court to the city’s Circuit Court. City taxpayers have paid out money to settle lawsuits against Laronde more than once.

In July 2006, Laronde testified in a federal court hearing that he had been accused of planting evidence and had, at that time, pending complaints of use of excessive force. The outcome of the complaints is not known.

In July 2009, a man claimed he was strip-searched by Laronde at a shopping center parking lot and released without any charges. A lawsuit the man filed was dismissed because of confusion over the incident’s date.

In June 2011, a man claimed Laronde stole $770 from him after an arrest for marijuana possession, a charge that was later dismissed. The case settled out of court for an unknown amount.

In April 2012, the city paid a man and woman $155,000 to settle their lawsuit against Laronde and two other officers. The man claimed he was strip-searched. Both claimed they were assaulted on the street.

Most recently, the city paid $20,000 to a man who claimed Laronde and another officer unlawfully detained him inside the Baltimore City Circuit Court. The man was employee of the court clerk.

Not surprisingly, the BPD is refusing to release details about the 7-11 incident except to say that they are not conducting a criminal investigation into his actions. Based on their past history of “investigating” Laronde, I wouldn’t hold my breath expecting results from this latest internal investigation, either.

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Six Baltimore Cops Indicted in Freddie Gray Murder to be Tried Separately Starting in October

bpd-gang-members-killed-freddie-gray-copblockAmid protests, a First Circuit Court judge ruled Wednesday that Edward Nero, Garrett Miller, William Porter, Caesar Goodson, Lt. Brian Rice, and Sgt. Alicia White; the six Baltimore police officers indicted for the in custody killing of Freddie Gray ; will be tried separately when the cases go to trial starting in October. In addition, Judge Barry G. Williams ruled against defense motions requesting that the charges be dismissed because of claims of prosecutorial misconduct and another motion seeking to force Prosecutor Marilyn Mosby to recuse herself from the cases.

It was a motion by the defense that had requested separate trials for the officers. The prosecution was seeking to have Goodson, Nero, and White tried together. The defense motions to dismiss charges or force Mosby’s recusal were based on a contention by the defense that Mosby had issued orders for police to crack down on the area where Freddie Gray was arrested and that his arrest was a result of those orders.

Defense attorneys have also claimed in court filings that BPD investigators had information that Freddie Gray had been involved in insurance fraud schemes, in which he would intentionally injure himself in order to collect settlements. However, they provided no actual proof of that allegation.

Freddie Gray Baltimore ProtestOutside the courtroom, dozens of protesters (per USA Today‘s estimates) demonstrated against racism and police violence, as well as advocating for convictions against the officers accused of causing Freddie Gray’s death. Signs being displayed outside the courthouse included, “Stop racism now.” There were also chants of “Indict, convict, send those killer cops to jail. The whole damn system is guilty as hell” and “Tell the truth and stop the lies, Freddie Gray didn’t have to die.”

The Baltimore Police Department announced, via Twitter, that one person had been arrested during the protests. in anticipation of further protests during the trial, leave for Baltimore police officers has been cancelled by the department.

The officers are facing various charges ranging from reckless endangerment to second degree murder. According to NBC News:

Edward Nero, Garrett Miller, William Porter and Caesar Goodson, and Lt. Brian Rice and Sgt. Alicia White — were arrested on reckless endangerment charges. Rice, Porter, and White are additionally facing manslaughter, while Goodson has also been charged with second-degree murder.

None of the officers personally attended the hearing. All six of them have pled not guilty to the charges.

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