Tag Archives: boston

Update: Florida Cop Who Tried to Murder 79 Year Old Woman Worked as Male Prostitute While On Duty

Last week, I posted on the CopBlock Network about Frankie Bybee, a Sarasota County Sheriff’s deputy who extorted cash from an elderly woman then tried to murder her in a staged suicide attempt once she filed a complaint against him. In the process, he also sold her dog on Craigslist, after charging her $1,000 to care for it while she was in the hospital.

Yesterday, an Internal Affairs report in the case was released. Not only did it contain new details concerning the original charges, including surveillance video of Bybee using the victim’s ATM card to withdraw money, but it also included some new revelations about “business deals” he was involved in.

Along with ten additional charges related to his use of the debit card and fraudulent online purchases Bybee made, Deputy Bybee is also facing new accusations that he acted as a male prostitute while on duty. The latter claim involves him having been paid to have sex with a woman, as well as to record videos of himself masturbating in his patrol car. The woman came forward after seeing media coverage of his charges for the murder attempt.

Via ABC Action News in Tampa:

According to the report, a woman, Elinor Jarvis, came forward and told detectives that they were “involved in an ongoing ‘business deal” for several years that included Dep. Bybee being financially compensated for engaging in sexual acts with her.”

The report said he met her years ago in a hotel room near Boston, Massachusetts and was paid $5,000 for their “initial sexual encounter.”

The report also said that Bybee would record himself in a sex act in his patrol vehicle while on duty and send the video to her via an app called “Tango” and then she would transfer $500 into his PayPal account.

The total payout, according to law enforcement, for these acts was more than $100,000.

The sheriff said Bybee’s actions were first brought to their attention on Jan. 9. That is when Marcia Sohl filed a complaint against then deputy Bybee.

Bybee, according to Knight, responded to a call for service at Sohl’s home on Oct. 21. He befriended Sohl and began to take advantage of her. Investigators released video they say shows Bybee withdrawing money from ATM’s across Sarasota using Sohl’s stolen debit card. In one transaction, Bybe is in uniform.

On Tuesday, Bybee was charged with ten new counts of Criminal Use of Information that involves several unauthorized uses of the victim’s credit card.

Also, according to the report, just prior to the murder attempt Bybee had used the original victim, email account to send a message to her doctor pretending to be her and expressing “suicidal implications.” As a result, the victim was involuntarily committed for a mental health evaluation (commonly referred to as a “Baker Act” hold). It was later determined that Deputy Bybee’s IP address was used to send the email as part of his plot to make it appear she had committed suicide.

In spite of all that, Bybee’s bail amount was dropped from $1,030,000 to $365,620

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Dover New Hampshire Police Keep Felony DUI by Influential Business Executive Out of News

The following post was shared with the CopBlock Network anonymously, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. Within the post, the submitter maintains that the executive of a power plant located in Ossippee, NH severally injured a member of his family while driving drunk. Furthermore, the person submitting this post states that, due to influence from his position and the accompanying wealth, as well as family connections within the Dover Police Department, the accident and subsequent trial has not been covered at all by the media.

June 2016

This is a news tip about a white New Hampshire power plant manager charged with felony DUI that never made it on the news because it was covered up. Robert Lussier has undergone over seven months of a felony DUI trial and not so much as his arrest has been reported by the news. This is a cover up at its finest. Roberts sentencing will be in February, you should give him the air time he deserves.

On the evening of June 24th, Lussier, of Dover, NH, was working at the Pine Tree Power Plant in Ossippee NH. The plant is owned by:

ENGIE North America
1990 Post Oak Boulevard, Suite 1900
Houston, Texas 77056-3831
Tel: 713.636.0000
[email protected]

Robert left the power plant and went straight to a local Ossippee bar with one of his employees and began drinking heavily. Robert, after drinking himself into a stupor, climbed in his vehicle and began driving home to Dover.

As Robert got on route 16, he hit the side of a pickup truck head on and bounced off He then drove straight head on into an old man driving his vehicle. Robert severed this mans legs and has forever altered this mans life. Yet it was never reported on the news. Robert’s vehicle was also totaled.

This is where is gets interesting. All you have to do is follow the trail of the cover up. The first police officer on scene was the son of one of Robert’s employees. This felony DUI crash, in which Robert was 100% at fault and removed a family member’s legs, was never reported by any news outlet. Robert’s blood alcohol content was three times the legal limit.

We’ve since found out that Robert’s father is also a retired state policeman who leveraged his time in uniform to make sure this accident stayed off the news. It worked. Robert successfully avoided his license suspension hearing because the associated officer was pressured not to show in court. After removing my family member’s legs and having a BAC three times the legal limit, Robert is still driving the roads of NH.

Sigh, must be nice to be a rich, white executive with a state police father.

Roberts sentencing is coming up in February. It’s not too late for you in the news industry to cover this story with the attention it deserves. I’d suggest digging into why this arrest is not on any police log, the Ossippee police love publishing photos and detailing the criminal actions of those who are not rich, white executives with state trooper fathers.

Some other interesting things to investigate:

Discovery had shined a light upon the fact that Robert is an avid gun enthusiast and we’ve found out he has an extensive arsenal of weapons. Robert cannot be trusted to drive his vehicle home at the end of a work day without a blood alcohol content of three times the legal limit, let alone to own an arsenal of guns. However, he’s still in possession of this firearm arsenal.

Robert has a NH license to carry permit. If he were not the son of a state policeman, this would have been revoked immediately. So not only is this irresponsible human being still behind the wheel of a vehicle after removing a my family members legs, he carries conceal firearms too.

The discovery process has produced yet another interesting paper trail you could investigate regarding his resident New Hampshire concealed carry permit. Investigate when he received his NH resident concealed carry permit and when he moved to Dover, NH.

Prior to moving to Dover, Robert lived his entire life in Massachusetts. By following the paper trail, you’ll notice that the Ossippee police chief gave Robert a NH resident concealed carry permit six months to a year before he actually moved to New Hampshire. Robert was given a NH resident concealed carry permit by the Ossippee police while he was still a Massachusetts resident, the paper trail will show this. That is completely illegal.

In the discovery process, we also found out that Robert has had some interesting run-ins with the law in Massachusetts, but his state police daddy covered things up yet again. Two years ago, Robert had a dog and that dog apparently bit someone. So Robert did what any responsible pet owner would do, he took the dog outside and shot it in the head; then buried it in a shallow grave. The Boston, Massachusetts police were not amused about Robert’s execution of the dog and he was under investigation after lying about the whereabouts of the dog. Once again, Robert’s state police daddy stepped in and the cover up began.

As you can see, Robert is troubled. However, he always manages to stay off of the news because of his father’s state police connection. I hope you can change this and give this story the attention it deserves. My family member is missing leg’s while Robert’s life has been unaffected.

Please help me and my family.

Questionable FBI Surveillance Aircraft Fleet Outed by Coalition of Journalists, Activists, And Techies

The following post was submitted to the CopBlock Network by Isiah Holmes, who has been featured several times previously on Cop Block, via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. In this post, Isiah discusses the use of aircraft FBI to conduct surveillance and the role that private citizens (along with the media) played in uncovering and exposing the program’s existence and just how widespread its use is.

(Note: The FBI’s use of surveillance aircraft to spy on activists and protesters was also discussed by Asa J in an earlier post published in August of last year.)

Mice Chasing The Hawk

There exists a variety of stories notorious — amongst those whom it concerns — for their uncanny quality of illuminating hidden plights and unsung heroes. Such tales, unfortunately, rarely experience veneration in modern western society. For the sake of this piece, think not of the many examples of centuries old legends and fables. Instead, accept the challenge of recognizing just one of this variety’s countless modern manifestations. For instance, when a loose coalition of professional and citizen journalists, activists, and techies blew the lid off the FBI’s questionable, nationwide aerial surveillance program. Blew the lid–only to have the story locked into a press loop where it ultimately succumbed to starvation. This piece might be considered a functional revival of the tale.

It began in Baltimore in 2015, after Freddie Gray’s death in police custody and during the subsequent protests and riots. Cameras were everywhere, whether belonging to Baltimore PD, press, bystanders or active civic dissidents. No one, however, anticipated cameras and cell phone collection tech, for that matter, having circled above them for days. International Business Times reports, Benjamin Shayne, leader of the police radio site www.scanbaltimore.com, was among the first to notice unusual air traffic. Shayne took to Twitter: “Anyone know who has been flying the light plane in circles above the city for the past few nights?” The planes, according to IBT, which flew from April 30th-May 2nd 2015, appeared shortly after Baltimore initiated a city-wide curfew.

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Following Benjamin’s tip, a coalition of Twitter and Reddit users, including one former ACLU employee, united to monitor the planes. According to IBT, a trove of data on the aircraft was compiled through their combined talents. Exact flight paths, docking airports, and owners were tracked. The planes were now being watched back.

According to a Washington Post piece, although one plane appeared to lack a tail number, a second was tracked back to “NG Research.” The company’s website boasts of expertise in air quality, aerosol chemistry, and health effects, but speaks not on why its plane was over Baltimore that day.

Once questions started flooding web feeds, the FBI, surprisingly, released a statement glistening with trepidation. “The aircraft,” officials said; according to the Washington Post, “were specifically used to provide high altitude observation of potential criminal activity to enable rapid response by police officials on the ground.” An Improv Online investigation into suspicious planes had–undoubtedly–forced “The Man” to come forward publicly on this “program.” Perhaps it’s safe to say that information, or rather free information, is power.

Due to the government’s reluctance, as well as technology concerns, the ACLU filed several FOIA requests. In tandem with the ACLU’s push, the Associated Press launched their own in depth investigation on the aircraft’s purpose and origin. As it turns out, an entire FBI controlled surveillance-purposed fleet waited for them at the end of the rabbit hole.

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The manned planes, carrying both powerful cameras, including infrared cameras, and cell phone data collection technology reputedly operate above cities quite often. All the craft, the Huffpost reports, are superficially attached not to a government program, but to fictitious companies used as fronts. Many sources reported on the infrared camera’s capabilities of literally seeing people inside of homes. The very nature of the technology is rather wide reaching and indiscriminate, meaning non-targets frequently are recorded. A 2001 Supreme Court decision, Kyllo v. United States, Washington Post reports, held using thermal imagers to “see details” inside enclosed buildings without a warrant amounts to an unlawful search.

AP journalists also discovered that despite the program’s capabilities, deployments are rarely approved by a judge. In light of this fact, according to the Huffington Post, FBI asserts the planes are deployed only for specific, ongoing investigations. Exactly what sort of investigations is entirely unclear.

In fact, nearly a year later, even basic information on the program is vigorously withheld. In terms of explicit references, the HuffPost reports, little more than already heavily censored Justice Department Inspector General reports is public. “The FBI’s aviation program is not secret”, says spokesman Christopher Allen. “Specific aircraft”, he continues, “and their capabilities are protected for operational purposes.” Allen, according to the HuffPost, asserts the planes are not “equipped, designed, or used for bulk collection activities or mass surveillance.” The FBI also, apparently, allocates the fleet as air support for local departments, on-request.

fbi-spy-plane-2-bSuch statements downplaying the possibility of bulk data collection do nothing, however, to explain the plane’s flight patterns. The AP, the HuffPost reports, uncovered flights orbiting large, enclosed buildings for extended periods of time. These areas, such as Virginia’s Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and Minnesota’s Mall Of America, made photo surveillance unlikely. Rather, electronic signals collection, the AP found, proves far more effective under such circumstances. The FBI planes, according to the AP’s flight data analysis, by 2015 had flown over at least 40,000 residents.

Conversely, officials did attribute gear capable of identifying people by their cellphones, even when not making calls, to the craft. Officials, the HuffPost echoed, say such devices, which mimic cellphone towers into providing basic subscriber information, are rarely deployed. The FBI’s cryptic program, sources claim, conjures memories of reports of suspicious planes circling US neighborhoods in 2003.

Through its investigation, the Associated Press was able to track 50 planes down to at least 13 fake companies. No, this is not hyperbole. They’re literally fraudulent, not real, lies, or whatever synonym you care to choose. FVX Research, KQM Aviation, NBR aviation, and PXW Services, according to the Huffington Post, were included among the AP’s findings. It’s interesting to note that, at least with these four companies, all have three letter acronym names. Not, of course, unlike the Federal Bureau of Investigations. A 2010 federal budget document, according to the HuffPost, verified the FBI’s fleet size at around 115 craft.

So really, to what extent is the federal law enforcement organization being brazenly, shamelessly deceptive? The FBI, according to the HuffPost, did ask the AP to not include any company names in its reporting. The bureau reputedly used the taxpayer dollars which would go towards replacing the disclosed companies as a kind of blackmail. Classy. The AP, of course, declined the FBI’s request as only publicly accessible information was used.

Most of the aircraft, despite belonging to different “companies”, were registered under a specific name–Robert Lindley. Registration documents signed by Lindley’s hand, HuffPost reports, display at least three distinct signatures. Hoping to verify the man’s existence, the AP has tried and failed to reach Robert through multiple Washington-area phone numbers under that name. FBI officials, to this day, refuse to comment on whether or not Lindley is a government employee.

By analyzing the plane’s flight data, journalists discovered the FBI fleet flew over more than 30 cities over a 30 day period. Since April 2015, two months before the Huffington Post piece, at least 100 flights circled both major cities and rural areas. Associated Press photographers even captured an image of a plane circling like a ghostly hawk in northern Virginia’s skies. The aircraft, the HuffPost reports, sported both a variety of suspicious antenna under its fuselage and a mounted camera.

Cities on the FBI’s flight list include: Houston, Phoenix, Seattle, Chicago, Boston, Minneapolis, and southern California. Some of these cities, a quick google search reveals, were subject to recent protests and/or civil unrest, such as California, Chicago and, of course, Baltimore. Despite any such public data professional and citizen journalists, analysts, or researchers may gleam, fundamental questions abound. What precisely is the purpose or function of this specific program? How long has it been operational, and under what laws is it bound or regulated? Where does excess data and footage go? How far is too far?

FBI Surveillance BaltimoreDespite the FBI’s recent downplaying of its surveillance program, its statement before congress in 2009 really says it all. “Aircraft surveillance has become an indispensable intelligence collection and investigative technique which serves as a force multiplier to the ground teams.” According to the Huffington Post, this was part of the FBI’s bid to Congress for $5.1 million in funding for the so-called “spy plane” program.

Ask yourself, what does this statement and the amount of money the FBI requested, taken either alone or together, say about the program? Does it seem like its aircraft and the technology they’re equipped with would be so rarely utilized as officials claim? “A lot of questions are unclear”, says ACLU staff attorney Nathan Wessler, the Washington Post reports.

Is it safe to suppose at least part of the programs mandate involves surveillance of generously populated protests, rowdy or otherwise? Almost sensing the question lurking about its flank the Justice Department, the HuffPost reports, maintained its “drones” don’t deploy “solely” to monitor First Amendment protected activity. In Baltimore’s case, according to FBI and Federal Aviation Administration documents, both night vision and inferred tech scanned crowds below. The documents, Washington Post reports, were obtained by the ACLU through Freedom Of Information Act requests.

An FBI official, under anonymity due to the programs sensitive nature, claimed the planes were ensuring public safety. The official, according to Washington Post, used a “potential for large scale violence and riots” as justification. “Potential”, suggesting the planes were in the air before the ground atmosphere went agro. In case you’re wondering, documents also showed no evidence of a warrant being obtained prior or after the Baltimore operation.

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If there’s at all a silver lining in any of this, it’s how much independent people really contributed to the story. Most of the information used to track, verify, and ultimately link the planes to FBI’s program hid within a slush of online data. Even the Associated Press wouldn’t have conducted an investigation had Benjamin Shayne not first tweeted about the suspicious planes. A decentralized online contingent of bloggers and Reddit users, not the organized press, was the first to conduct any serious inquiry. It’s an utter travesty that the same headline, “FBI behind mysterious surveillance aircraft over cities”, along with nearly the same AP articles, were published across the board. If that’s not a press loop then a challenge goes out to anyone who can give a more textbook example.

For anyone interested conducting a more concurrent investigation, technologist John Wiseman, Fusion.net reports, has some tips to offer. Wiseman himself used public records to get flight routes, some of which can be found online. One would be surprised what kind of legitimate information floats about the slush untouched simply because no one, except those who care, bothers to look. John also reputedly used a modified radio receiver to pick up aircraft transmissions, and tracked tail numbers, provided by the Washington Post, to a fake company. Wiseman, Fusion.net reports, recommends sites like flightradar20 and flightaware for tracking aircraft registration numbers.

Here’s where this blog gets functional! Anyone willing, able, and/or both are by all means invited to rehash the investigation. Larger news organizations might feel subliminal pressure from the feds to keep quiet, edit stories, or what have you, but the people will not. How hard would it be to, say, check up on new data on the already “found out” planes? Where are they now? Have they traded hands or do the front-companies still stand? Speaking of the “companies”, they’re fair game too! NG Research, for example, has a website which can be easily found by googling the company name. No, there isn’t any product listings on the page. No, the page hasn’t changed for over a year despite it apparently being an actual company. A functional revival of the FBI’s surveillance program, even if not published, may prove uniquely valuable in the days to come.

– Isiah Holmes

Boston Police Sgt’s Defense: My Penis Probably Wasn’t The First One 16 Year Old Girl Saw

Kenneth Anderson, the lawyer for Boston Police Sergeant Edwin Guzman, stated earlier this week that it was okay if his client sent a sixteen year old girl pictures of his penis because: “You can’t tell me someone her age has never seen a picture of a penis on the Internet.” It’s an interesting albeit not very convincing defense to say the least for Sgt. Guzman, who’s facing charges of “annoying and accosting a person of the opposite sex” and “disseminating harmful material to a minor,” but apparently is in talks with prosecutors to resolve the case. It’s not clear what exactly that means, but as you can see below, it probably means Guzman’s gonna have to ice down a sore wrist at some point in the near future.

Via : (Watch the report here)

Sgt. Edwin Guzman is accused of sending sexually explicit Facebook messages to a minor.

Guzman was promoted to sergeant in August 2014, around the same time he allegedly sent the messages to the teenager who says she considered Guzman a family friend and father figure.

“It started off we regularly chat and it’s mostly about school and how life is,” the teenager who was 16 at the time told 5 Investigates’ Mike Beaudet.

But she says the conversations kept escalating from there.

“If I gave him like pleasure and let him do things to me, he’d be willing to buy me things,” she said. “He took a picture of his penis and he sent it to me.”

Guzman was charged in Quincy District Court with sending obscene matter to a minor and accosting and annoying a person of the opposite sex.

The Norfolk District Attorney’s office has confirmed the charges were based on the allegedly explicit messages and picture.

But nearly two years later we’ve learned the more serious charge of sending obscene matter to a minor is expected to be dropped, a charge that carried a potential prison sentence of up to five years.

While officials say they believe the alleged victim’s story and they have the deleted Facebook messages, they’ve been unable to recover the naked photo.

The alleged victim’s mother is upset the case has dragged on for so long, culminating in this setback.

“I think the system’s screwed up,” she said. “I still feel like he came out winning.”

The alleged victim’s mother says the district attorney’s office has told her Guzman had indicated he would plead guilty to the lesser charge, if he avoids jail time so the family is willing to go along, rather than risk a jury finding him not guilty.

“I’d rather have him plead guilty on his own and say he’s guilty of one thing,” said the mother of the alleged victim.

“Do you think this is justice?” asked 5 Investigates’ Beaudet.

“Not at all. It’s a slap on the wrist,” she replied.

Guzman is due in court Friday morning. His lawyer wouldn’t comment on whether a plea deal could be reached by then.

Boston police tell us their internal investigators are monitoring the case and will begin an investigation which will ultimately decide if he gets to keep his job, once the criminal case is resolved.

For now, Guzman remains on paid administrative leave.

That paid vacation Sgt. Guzman has been on has lasted for just under a year and a half. That’s a nice bonus for the former Boston Police Department officer of the year (2012).

Abington Mass. Police Chief Proposed “Friendly” Kidnapping Competition

In the spirit of the holidays, Chief David Majenski of the Abington Police Department, in Massachusetts, sent out an email to “motivate” his officers proposing a “friendly competition” to see who could kidnap the most people within the month of October. The winner was to receive a weekend off in November as a bounty.

Somehow encouraging cops within their city to find any excuse they could to pad their arrest numbers didn’t sit well with the citizens of Abington. Although the competition is supposed to be voluntary according to Chief Majenski, it raised obvious questions about the effect it might have on the perceived objectivity of police officers and the fact that it created a de facto quota system.

Via MyFoxBoston.com:

“They are supposed to be neutral and independent when they are investigating potential criminal wrongdoing,” Krowski said.

The “friendly competition” could also impact something else; the criminal cases that resulted from those arrests.

“It shows a motive, motive and bias against the defendant. A lack of neutrality,” [defense attorney Joseph] Krowski said.

The rumors (that I just started) of another contest Chief Majenski was considering to see which officer could beat up the most minorities in the month of December have yet to be confirmed (it’s probably “voluntary,” also).

Boston News, Weather, Sports | FOX 25 | MyFoxBoston

Boston Cop Claims It’s Illegal to Film Him Without Informing Him First

This video from the PoliceRecording.com YouTube channel (it’s actually more of an audio recording) shows a traffic stop in Boston. The unidentified officer heard on the video notices the passenger is recording with his cell phone. He then very incorrectly states that it is illegal to do so without informing him that he is being filmed. This traffic stop obviously took place in public view. As everyone who regularly reads this site is well aware, it is therefore perfectly legal (and very much recommended) to film this police officer during the course of his duties.

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The original description included with the video:

Location: Washington St. Boston, MA
Date: September 18th, 2015, at approx. 1:15 am.

Sadly, I didn’t get the officer’s name or badge number.
Let’s just call him Officer Twat.

Rough officer description:
Black male, mid 30s to mid 40s, smelled like bacon. Drove an SUV-type vehicle.

Officer was accompanied by a white male/partner who behaved reasonably well (he never opened his mouth and gave me a good impression, overall). I commend him for it.

General video description:
My brother gets pulled over for speeding. This is NOT in the video recording, but he initially asks the cop, “May I ask why I’m being stopped?” At this point, the officer gives a rude and condescending answer, “If you would just let me do my job. Just let me do my job.” (You REALLY had to be there to catch the ugly tone.)

Sarcasm: Sorry for asking a basic and perfectly legitimate question, officer [facepalm].

The cop then walks back to his car with my brother’s license and registration. Three minutes later, he comes back and soon realizes I was (gasp!) recording the incident.

The Boston police officer gets offended because of being video-recorded. He insists I have to let him know beforehand.

In other words, the poor guy thinks I have to get his approval. Sorry, but I’m not your wife.

Other useful information, for the hell of it:

Quote from the Boston.com article, How a Boston Case Won You the Right to Record Police: “Massachusetts is a ‘two party consent’ state, which means it’s illegal to record audio without the knowledge and permission of the person you are recording — unless, as we’ll see, that person is a government official in a public space.”

For the record:

Boston drivers: Beware of Officer Twat. He clearly seems mentally unstable and gets agitated easily.

Recording Police CopBlock

Everyone else: Always video-record the police, no matter how mundane the situation may be. You never know when they might go batshit crazy and violate your rights.

Get a video streaming app such as Bambuser.

Q&A:

  • Q: You never recorded the cop’s face!
    A: I wanted to protect the driver’s identity. As a result, the focus remained on the dashboard.
  • Q: That sounds awfully hypocritical. What about respecting the officer’s wishes?
    A: In the end, citizens have the right to videotape (or avoid) whomever we choose. I was merely exercising those rights. Deal with it.
  • Q: Why is the driver so apologetic?
    A: Who knows. Maybe he wanted to defuse the situation (the wrong way, mind you). He even apologized for asking why he was being stopped earlier (which he shouldn’t have).
  • Q: I’m a cop. How can I reduce the chances of ever landing on YouTube?
    A: Let’s put it this way: The more you complain about being videotaped, the more you’re going to end up all over the internet. If you simply ignore the camera, then there’s nothing special about the encounter — thus the video wouldn’t go online.

NEVER, EVER complain about being videotaped; you’re only shooting yourselves in the foot.

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We Already Know That Police Lives Matter (More)

This post was submitted by George MacGregor, the founder of Yuba-Sutter CopBlock, via the CobBlock.org submissions page.

Along with his submission, George states:

I recently founded Yuba-Sutter CopBlock. I have only just started CopBlocking, and have recorded police on a couple of occasions. (I’m planning on doing much more in the future.) This is just an opinion piece that I felt compelled to write after someone posted this picture on my personal Facebook wall.

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What a ridiculous statement. Police Lives Matter. Of course they do. How do we know? We are constantly told and shown that cop’s lives matter more than any other life. We see it in the news whenever a cop is killed.

Don’t take my word for it. Let’s just take a few examples from recent history:

  • The Boston Bomber: killed a cop.
  • Christopher Dorner: killed a cop.
  • One of the two escaped convicts in Pennsylvania: killed a cop.
  • And finally, there is a manhunt going on right now, in Illinois, for three men who shot a cop. (Update: Turns out that that horribly corrupt cop staged a murder, including framing three innocent people, in order to cover for his own suicide.)

When a cop gets killed, no amount of manpower or resources are too much. No effort or money is spared. They will continue unrelenting for weeks or even months, until the cop killer is caught or killed. Other crimes, or need for help, that comes from mere mortal citizens during this time, are often ignored or delayed for the more important task of catching the person that dared harm someone from their gang.

Another great place on the internet to show your CopBlock love.

Another great place on the internet to show your CopBlock love.

They suspend all of our Fourth Amendment rights by putting up road blocks, shutting down streets, or even whole neighborhoods in their relentless search. Nobody else’s rights are allowed during this time. People are ORDERED to stay in their homes, or not allowed to return to their homes. Backyards, outbuildings, and EVEN PEOPLES HOUSES are searched without a warrant and without probable cause.

Three people were shot by police during the search for Christopher Dorner because they were driving pick-up trucks. Not the same color of truck, or even the same manufacturer, just a truck. These three people who shot by police were two women and a skinny white guy. (Christopher Dorner was a large black man, WHO ONCE WAS A COP TOO.)

Got a job to go to? Have a life to live? Children to pick up and drop off? Too bad, the hunt for a cop killer is far more important than any of these things. These extreme measures are not used even for serial killers, only cop killers. When have we ever seen roadblocks and massive manhunts for a shooting in the “hood”? Police believe that all “good” citizens, should freely and willingly give up these petty little constitutional rights for the more important task of catching “bad guys”.

SupportCopblock Square BannerWhen a cop is killed, they are instantly hailed as a hero by the media and police. They will tell you about all the commendations they have received, how many years they “served” the public, and tell you about the wife and kids that were left behind. They don’t tell you about how many complaints were filed against them. They don’t tell you how many excessive force complaints were upheld against them. They don’t tell you if the cop cost the city millions in settlements. They don’t say ANYTHING NEGATIVE about the cop at all.

Now contrast that to a cop shooting an innocent, unarmed person. The police instantly vilify the victim by releasing any and all history with law enforcement. Every petty offense for marijuana or any domestic dispute ever reported is now laid out for everyone to see. The message is clear. The person was obviously a bad person, so it’s OK that they were killed. No award or community achievements are mentioned. No mention that they had a family, or kids, that were left behind.

When a cop gets shot, things happen fast. Police release 911 calls, video of the crime and the person (if available), as well as their name and any other negative information that they can find. They are arrested immediately and put in jail, not to be released even on bail until they can be tried for their crimes.

banner copblock twitterWhen a cop shoots someone, the cops name remains secret, the video remains secret, and it will take up to three years for the police department to investigate themselves. Cops are very rarely held accountable for these killings, and if they are held accountable, the punishment is usually very light, if at all. (a verbal reprimand for killing someone is not much punishment.)

So, yes, we all know that cops lives matter. We are reminded this by the cops themselves on a regular basis. The question then becomes, do black lives matter to cops? Their words say “YES”, but their actions say “NO”. Not that cops don’t think black lives matter, or citizens lives matter, just not as much as a cop’s life. Cops’ actions tell us that it is better that 20 innocent people get killed due to imaginary threats, than one cop killed by a real threat. It doesn’t matter who else gets killed, as long as the cops get to go home at the end of their shift. Police even say publicly that their safety is the number one priority above all else. That’s their safety, not the public’s safety.

A true hero is one who accepts the risk of injury or death to protect an innocent life. A cop on the other hand, holds their own safety above the life of any others. ( i.e., it is better that 20 “suspects” get killed for “reaching for something in their waistband” when there is nothing there, than one cop get killed because he waited to see if there was actually a real threat.) And lets get real about this. If a black man is running from cops, and he is reaching for his waistband, odds are, he isn’t reaching for a gun, HE IS JUST TRYING TO KEEP HIS PANTS UP! It is very difficult to run with your pants around your knees.

When police begin to demonstrate that our lives, and our safety are JUST AS IMPORTANT as cops’ lives or safety, then maybe we will believe the rhetoric that is being spewed from the mouths of the Police Unions.

-George MacGregor

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When Police Go Rogue on Facebook by Ken Armstrong of the Marshall Project

This post was shared with the CopBlock Network by a reader, via the CopBlock.org Submission Page. It was originally published by Ken Armstrong at themarshallproject.org.

Last week, Seattle police apologized for an incident in which a female officer arrested a 69-year-old man walking in the city with a golf club. She said he wielded the club as a weapon. He said it was simply a cane. Police video supported the man’s account.

But it was only after another discovery – made by a Seattle newspaper, The Stranger – that the police department removed the officer from street duty, assigning her to a desk.

The officer is white. The man she arrested with the golf club is black. Last year, the officer posted this on Facebook: “If you believe that blacks are NOT accusing white America for their problems then you are missing the point of the riots in Ferguson and the chronic black racism that far exceeds any white racism in this country. I am tired of black peoples paranoia that white people are out to get them. … I am tired of black people saying poor poor me …”

When Seattle’s police chief read those Facebook comments last week, she said she was “shocked and disappointed.”

Around the country, other chiefs can relate. So can other communities where officers – and sometimes, the police chiefs themselves – have posted Facebook messages that created controversy and sometimes led to suspensions or firings. Such episodes have played out on other social-media sites, of course. And, like the Internet itself, they extend beyond the United States. (In the United Kingdom, more than 150 officers have faced disciplinary action for bad Facebook behavior, including one constable who wrote: “Let’s not be so soft on these [worst expletive imaginable] out there.”)

But looking just at Facebook – and just at police in the United States – here’s a roundup of cases where officers have been accused of crossing a line when going online.

Marlin, Texas: A police sergeant was fired in August 2014 after posting this on Facebook: “The first day of the month! The day I absolutely LOVE going to the grocery store after putting in 120+ hours last month. I love being able to see how the useless lazy turd bags spend the hard earned money my working friends and I provided for them so they can sit of their lazy asses all month and drink the beer I am paying for. I especially love it in the summer so I can admire the thousands of dollars of ink they have adorning their unclean bodies as they smile at me with that mouth full of bling. Makes me want to help them take their groceries and help them load them into that Escalade with $4000 rims. I promise, if I ever snap and go on a killing spree, it will be in a supermarket on the first.” (Elsewhere in Texas, police have created Facebook dustups in Dallas, Emory, and Matagorda County.)

Jonesboro, Ark.: The same month that police sergeant was fired in Texas, the police chief in Jonesboro, Ark., resigned. The chief, on Facebook, called a newspaper reporter a “pro-dope smoking, law license revoked, left wing liberal.” He also called her “smelly,” and wrote: “Dealing with ole Sunshine is like trying to pick up a dog turd by the ‘clean end.’” Jonesboro’s mayor handed the chief a 30-day suspension, but the chief quit before serving it. (And he wasn’t the only police chief to resign last August over a Facebook post. The chief in Chickasha, Okla., did, too. Before that, so did the police chief in Williamston, S.C.)

Bainbridge Island, Wash.: On this island in the Puget Sound, police in 2010 shot and killed a mentally ill man, in a case that prompted a civil rights lawsuit and a $1 million verdict against the city. A week after the shooting, the officer who opened fire received a Facebook message from a Los Angeles cop, who flippantly referred to the shooting as “combat qual.” The Bainbridge officer responded, on Facebook, with: “no sweat here … bad guy should have listened a little better.” (A year later, a different Bainbridge officer was reprimanded for going on Facebook and writing of a crackdown on traffic offenses: “We rained terror on the island and no one was taken alive.”)

Portsmouth, Va.: In 2011, a police officer shot and killed an intoxicated, unarmed cook, a citizen of Kazakhstan who was struck 11 times. Afterward, the officer’s Facebook page – captured by The Virginian-Pilot before disappearing from the web – became the subject of an internal review. Among other postings, he described a photo of a box of handguns as his “box of VENGEANCE!” and wrote: “would be better if i was dirtying them instead of cleaning them!”

Boston, Mass.: Last year, a police officer for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority posted on Facebook: “Farther’s (sic) Day, the most confusing day in Roxbury.” The president of the Boston NAACP told television station WCVB, “It’s a sad commentary on what this gentleman thinks is going on in communities of color.” Afterward, the officer was stripped of his role as a police-academy drill instructor.

Indianapolis, Ind.: Television station WTHR aired an investigative report in 2009 about an Indiana state trooper’s Facebook posts. “I pick up trash for a living,” the trooper wrote. He boasted of drinking heavily and posted a photo in which a fellow police officer pointed a .357 Magnum at the trooper’s head. By matching Facebook’s timestamps with state patrol employment records, the station discovered that the trooper sometimes posted while on duty. The trooper subsequently resigned.

Albuquerque, N.M.: That trooper certainly wasn’t the only police officer to refer to people as garbage. In 2011, an Albuquerque police officer shot a man in the back after a traffic stop, killing him. Soon after, local media reported that the officer listed his job on Facebook as “human waste disposal.” No charges were filed against the officer for the shooting, but he did get a four-day suspension for his Facebook post.

New York City: In 2009, a New York City police officer described his Facebook status as “watching ‘Training Day’ to brush up on proper police procedure.” A few weeks later, that post was used to attack the officer’s credibility when a defendant he had arrested went to trial. (In “Training Day,” there is little, if anything, proper about the corrupt narcotics detective played by Denzel Washington.) Two years later, more than a dozen NYPD officers posted offensive comments about the West Indian Day Parade, leading to eventual discipline.

Monroe, La.: Responding to the protests in Ferguson, Mo., following the grand jury’s decision not to indict officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown, a police officer in Monroe, La., went on Facebook and wrote: “Ive got an idea on how to clear the streets in Ferguson Missouri. Lets have a crop duster fly over and drop job applications.” The officer, who was subsequently placed on leave, also wrote: “I’m surprised the beauty salon didn’t have armed guards. That ‘good hair’ is expensive. Thats ghetto gold.” Police elsewhere also made Facebook posts about Ferguson that stirred controversy. That happened, among other places, in Elgin, Ill.;Glendale, Mo.; Portland, Ore.; Kansas City; and Seattle.

Volusia, Fla.: Before Michael Brown’s death, there was the controversy surrounding Trayvon Martin’s. In 2013, on the day George Zimmerman was acquitted in Martin’s death, a Volusia County Beach Safety officer posted on Facebook: “Another thug gone. Pull up your pants and be respectful. Bye bye thug r.i.p.” The following month, the officer was fired.

Five Solutions To Reign In The Police State

The post below was shared with the CopBlock Network by “Jeremy,” via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. It discusses abuses by the government and some solutions that could be implemented right now to halt what is rapidly becoming a police state within the United States.

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The problem with police brutality and overreaction is appalling and ever growing.

What if I told you that there was a place where martial law was declared, a whole city was shut down, and the police detained anyone on the street and broke into countless peoples houses on the premise of protecting them? Thinking it must be China or Russia or Nazi Germany? No this tale happened here. In Boston after the marathon bombing.

Our rights as Americans are slowly being taken away under the guise of public safety. Did shutting down the city save anyone? No, but it set an extremely dangerous precedent of police trampling on the rights of the American people.

These brutal incidents are exactly the reason why the United States of America were formed in the first place. The Revolutionary War was  a case of the American people standing up and saying we will no longer tolerate oppression from those appointed to protect us. It starts at the bottom with the individual police force and will rapidly grow from there.

How do we make a difference? Here are five things that we can do to cause change.

  1. Require that all officers of the law wear body cameras at all times that they are performing their duties. This alone in forces that have adopted them has had an enormous impact in the number of incidents of police brutality. And as they are public servants, the public has a right to know what they are doing.
  2. Immediately stop all transfers of military equipment to police forces and confiscate or destroy all equipment previously transferred. Why? Because they are the police, not the military. The job of the military is to protect us from foreign threats and they are equipped to do so. The job of the police is to enforce the law, not protect the nation from an invading army. Why exactly do they need tanks and machine guns to enforce the law?
  3. Immediately enact strict physical fitness standards. Did you know that over 80% of cops are overweight? Did you ever think that if the officer involved in the Ferguson shooting was not overweight he may have been capable of arresting the young man without resorting to killing him? Too many police have only the option of deadly force to use against a suspect because they are incapable of holding their own due to their obesity.
  4. In any incident where police brutality is suspected, make it a requirement that an independent authority review the incident and recommend charges. A company who defrauds consumers doesn’t get to investigate itself to find if it did anything wrong, so why do the police get to?
  5. Prosecute and treat police as any other suspect would be treated. My mind goes back to a particular incident where a officer shot a man laying on the ground handcuffed in cold blood, was videotaped doing it, and only received a year in jail. If you or I did that we would either be jailed for life or given the death penalty for murder.

This is just the beginning. Will this fix everything? No, but it will serve to stop the march of the United States towards a police state.

If we do not act now, we will wake up one day to find that we have no rights left, and the only way to right the ship at that point will be armed revolution.