Tag Archives: body cameras

Additional Eyewitness Videos of Keith Scott Shooting Via Charlotte Cop Block

New video footage and information from the police shooting of Keith Scott in Charlotte has been uncovered by the Facebook Page of the Charlotte Cop Block affiliate of the CopBlock Network. The first is obviously a legitimate cell phone video of the scene where Keith Scott was shot immediately after it took place recorded by an unidentified bystander. In the second video included below, a woman being interviewed says that she actually witnessed the shooting.

The original Facebook posts from the Charlotte Cop Block FB page, as well as Youtube uploads of the videos are both embedded below. I’ve also included the newly released video taken by Keith’s Scott’s wife from CopBlock Network contributor ‘ earlier video post.

In addition to the video taken by Keith Scott’s wife Rakeyia that the Scott family released earlier today, another video taken by an eyewitness to the shooting showing the moments after Scott was shot has been made public:

Another video from a witness shot from a distance shows the scene right after the shooting…. You can see officers doing a whole lot… Handcuffing, emptying pockets, pulling his pants down, but NO CPR!!

Also, a video interview of a woman who claims she witnessed the shooting has surfaced. In that video, Tracey Mclain disputes several aspects of the official story from the Charlotte-Mecklenberg police, including the identity of the officer that shot Scott. She also states that the police threatened to shoot bystanders and didn’t start doing CPR on Scott right away, although eventually they did:

A woman who identifies herself as Tracey Mclain says she was there, she witnessed the shooting and says that the #CMPD are lying and a white officer shot him not the black officer and that they also lied about giving CPR right away… The #Truth is coming forward piece by piece….

Video Credit: Ramon Dotch

Another issue raised by those at Charlotte Cop Block concerns the photo CMPD released purporting to show a gun at the scene after Scott was shot. As you can see in the photos within the embedded post below, no such gun is present within the video taken by Rakeyia Scott. In fact, what is claimed to be a gun in the CMPD’s photo is actually pretty clearly a medical glove, as pointed out in the post. (You can also see one of the cops pulling a black glove off and throwing it on the ground in the first video above.)

This obviously brings up the question of why the CMPD would lie about the photo supposedly showing a gun. If there genuinely was a gun there would be no need to do so. Also, it brings into question whether the blurriness of the area where the glove is was done as an intentional manipulation of evidence to try and support their official story.

If the folks at Charlotte Cop Block come across any additional videos or information, I will update this post. You can also submit content and/or video to the CopBlock Network yourself using the CopBlock.org Submissions Page.

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Video of Keith Scott Shooting Recorded by His Wife

Riots Erupt in North Carolina After Man Holding Book Killed By Police While Picking Up Son From School

Update: People are beginning to gather in Charlotte again and it appears their may be a second night of riots. Reportedly, riot police are already using tear gas and rubber bullets in an effort to disperse a growing crowd.

Click here for a livestream of the riots currently taking place in Charlotte.

On September 20th, riots broke out near the campus of UNC-Charlotte after Charlotte-Mecklenburg police shot a man while searching for a different man wanted on a warrant.

Police claim that the man they killed, identified as Keith Lamont Scott, had stepped out of his car with a gun and then subsequently got back inside. They then claim he got back outside of the vehicle after they approached and posed an “imminent deadly threat” to them, necessitating his shooting.

Although the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police began using body cams a year ago, at least three, and possibly four, of the previous five fatal shootings by the department “somehow” weren’t captured by the body cameras. (“It’s unclear if a June 3 shooting was filmed by the department’s body cameras.” – According to the HuffPost article quoted below.)

According to CMPD Police Chief Kerr Putney, some of the officers at the scene were wearing body cams and there is also video from dash cameras, but he hasn’t reviewed the footage yet and he is predictably refusing to release it using various excuses. In addition, North Carolina recently passed a law restricting the public’s access to police shooting videos. So, it’s unlikely that any video will be released unless it clearly supports the police narrative of what happened, regardless.

Via the Huffington Post:

The shooting ― the sixth Charlotte-Mecklenburg police killing of a civilian in the past year ― happened just before 4 p.m. at an apartment complex roughly a mile from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department officers were searching at the complex for someone else who was wanted on an outstanding warrant, police said in a statement.

During the search, officers said they saw a man exit a vehicle with a firearm, then get back inside. When police approached, the man got out of the vehicle again and “posed an imminent deadly threat to the officers who subsequently fired their weapon striking the subject,” according to the police statement.

Police said they called a medic and administered CPR. Scott, 43, died at the hospital.

Police identified the shooter as Officer Brentley Vinson, who has worked for the department since July 2014. Vinson is black.

Witnesses, however, testified that he was disabled and was “armed” only with a book. Later, Scott’s brother stated that Keith Scott was reading the book while waiting to pick his son up from a school bus prior to the incident that led to him being shot. Scott’s sister also stated that he was unarmed when he was shot. Family and other witnesses also stated that the police involved in the shooting were dressed in plain clothes, rather than in police uniforms.

Lyric Scott, Keith’s daughter, posted an hour-long video of the family confronting the police afterwards, via Facebook Live. During the video she stated, “The police just shot my daddy four times for being black.” Soon after, hundreds of protesters began converging on the location where Keith Scott had been shot.

Lyric Scott’s Video:

Protests soon turned into a full scale riot with least 16 cops being injured in the ensuing mayhem. Several police cars were destroyed by the protesters, who also blocked traffic on I-85 and broke into a local Walmart. In the process, several semi trucks on the highway were also looted and then set on fire. In addition, numerous other cops that had been surrounded while heroically attempting to flee the scene of the riots had to be rescued by a “Civil Emergency Unit.”

Other Video/Photos:

If You Want True Reform, Abolish The Police!

This post was written by and originally published at the Center For a Stateless Society (C4SS) under the title “Ferguson, Accept No Substitutes: Abolish the Police!” Posts and other content can be submitted to the CopBlock Network via the CopBlock.org Submission Page. (Note: some links have been inserted, although no edits to the original text were made.)

Back in August 2014 a man named Michael Brown was shot by a police officer, Darren Wilson. Brown was unarmed and found himself in the hostile climate that exists between people of color and the police. His resulting death was the spark that lit the fire. Protests for #BlackLivesMatter began in earnest, people rallied for justice for Brown (Wilson was eventually acquitted of any wrong-doing) and in general, folks were deeply upset with the city of Ferguson.

Whether Brown’s actions warranted the almost 10 shots he received by officer Wilson, the background context of the event couldn’t be denied. Even the Department of Justice (DoJ) noted, to quote CBS, “a portrait of poor community-police relations, ineffective communication among the more than 50 law enforcement agencies that responded, police orders that infringed on First Amendment rights, and military-style tactics that antagonized demonstrators.”

The DoJ also remarked on a broad pattern of discrimination by the Ferguson police, particularly towards people of color.

What has changed in over a year and a half?

In September, CBS reported that, “Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon recommended the consolidation of police departments and municipal courts in the St. Louis area, and decreasing the use of police force.”

But more recently and perhaps more promisingly to some, there has been a proposed agreement between the DoJ and the City of Ferguson. If approved, this agreement would postpone any sort of federal lawsuit and make changes to local policies concerning the police. CBS reported that the proposal was even brought before the public for “feedback” before its approval.

Policy changes could include mandatory body cameras and microphones for police and their cruisers. In addition, there could be more thorough training of police and possible revisions of municipal codes that allow the City of Ferguson to jail people who can’t afford fines.

All of these things, if actually implemented, might sound like decent reforms.

But as fellow C4SS writer Thomas L. Knapp wrote back in December of 2014, when it comes to body cameras and the like, “Video technology is certainly part of the solution to police violence, but that solution should remain in the hands of regular people, not the state. … Cops need to be on cameras they don’t control.”

Why would we want the police to regulate themselves on how well they’re doing? A recent example of Chicago police officers tampering with their dash cams is just the tip of the iceberg. Somehow police often “mysteriously” can’t find evidence against themselves. It seems unlikely that it’d be any different in Ferguson.

Likewise, though there’d be more thorough training of the police, who would it be by? Other police? That’s likely the end result of this supposed “thorough” training that may teach “tolerance” for the disabled and marginalized. But acceptance is a lot more meaningful than tolerance, and how can we expect either to be taught to the police in any case?

They operate in an institution founded on “I was just taking orders” as a legitimate defense to wrong-doing. They operate in an institution that, if it really only had “a few bad apples”, would’ve done something more drastic than putting murdering cops on paid vacations. They operate in an institution that lacks any sort of communal competition in many areas, giving them de facto monopoly provision of defense. This monopoly leads not only to a lack of accountability but also violence on the part of the police.

Lastly, it seems unlikely that the city would, for some reason, stop imprisoning less fortunate citizens. If they’re able to make money off of these prisoners, why would they stop it? It seems akin to asking cops to stop profiting from traffic stops.

It’s a nice gesture to let the public “look” at the document before it’s actually passed.

But that’s all it is, a gesture.

Real change won’t come from the fox guarding the hen house. Real change will come from communities coming together and modeling their efforts less on busy-body neighborhood watches and more like the Black Panthers.

Further, community involvement shouldn’t aid prisons and punishment but rather should entice restitution and resolve.

To do that, my advice is simple: Abolish the police!

Bill Scott Testimony in Support of NV Bodycam Bill: “My Son Erik Might Be Alive Today…” (Video)

“My eldest son, Erik Scott, might be alive today if Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department officers had been required to wear body cameras in the summer of 2010, when Erik was shot to death.”

– William B. Scott

On March 31, 2015, the Nevada State Assembly’s Government Affairs Committee held a hearing on Nevada State Assembly Bill AB403, which would require all Nevada police to wear body cameras. Testimony was given by various witnesses, both for and against, the proposed bill. Among those speaking in support of mandating bodycams was Bill Scott, whose son Erik Scott was gunned down by three members of the LVMPD outside a Summerlin, NV Costco, back in 2010.

Body CameraOne of the most contentious issues relating to that day has always been the lack of a video showing what exactly happened. Further, the incredibly dubious claim that the one camera which would have provided that video was malfunctioning at the time, has done nothing but create questions and inspire doubt. Although that controversy itself, along with the already mounting examples of body worn or dash mounted cameras similarly “malfunctioning” or simply being shut off by cops, shows why bodycams and dashcams aren’t the end all-solution to police abuses, they certainly could go a long way toward curtailing them, as Bill rightly states in his testimony. This would be especially true, if they were accompanied with real consequences for police officers that tamper with or turn off those cameras.

As has been demonstrated many times, knowing they are on camera and that there will be evidence of their crimes has often worked very effectively as a deterrent to police abuses. Even when cops aren’t wise enough to stay on good behavior because they know they are being filmed, cameras have often yielded the proof necessary to hold them accountable for their actions. Access and control of that evidence is still a huge issue that necessitates that we should still carry our own cameras and film the police every time we or someone else is stopped by the police, however having another camera recording all the time is obviously a step in the right direction.

Interestingly, the almost singular excuse used to oppose bodycams by those speaking against them (which consisted almost exclusively of police employees) was the expense involved in buying them and storing the footage. That’s actually kind of understandable, since the cops obviously don’t want to just come right out and say they don’t want anybody to see all the bad shit they do all day or especially not to have irrefutable evidence, when those things cross the line into prosecutable acts. The problem with that line of reasoning is that all of the many lawsuits being paid out for the bad conduct of police would more than easily pay for the added expense associated with requiring body cameras.

CBN-network-bannerIn Las Vegas, the citizens eventually paid about $2,000,000 total for the settlements to the family of Stanley Gibson, after he was murdered by Jesus Arevalo (who is also receiving between $23,000 and $28,000 every year from those taxpayers, as a de facto reward for that murder). That alone would put a huge dent in the cost required to outfit cops within the LVMPD with bodycams. So, the deterrence for murders by Nevada police that wearing bodycams would represent, would more than likely actually save money by eliminating the need to constantly pay those settlements to the families of their victims, as well as the associated increases in the premiums (from $1.3 million in 2012 to $6.9 in 2013 at the LVMPD) for the liability insurance that Nevada police departments have against such settlements.

Bill opens his half-hour long testimony (video embedded below) with these statements:

My eldest son, Erik Scott, might be alive today, if Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Dept. officers had been required to wear body cameras in the summer of 2010, when Erik was shot to death. Why? Because body-worn cameras are a powerful deterrent to the use of deadly force. They literally are “unimpeachable  witnesses.”


Officer William Mosher—who panicked and shot my son as Erik and his girlfriend calmly walked out of Costco-Summerlin—had already killed one man, in his first five years on the Las Vegas Metro force. That shooting was ruled “justified.” With no video evidence or civilian witnesses, inquest jurors had no alternative but to accept the accounts of on-scene police officers, even though they were highly suspect.


If he’d been wearing a bodycam on July 10, 2010, Mosher might not have fired at Erik. Having narrowly escaped criminal charges before, Mosher might have asked himself—as he hovered near the door of Costco, shaking like the proverbial leaf, according to witnesses:  “If I shoot and kill again, will I be fired? Will criminal charges be filed against me?” With his and dozens of other cops’ body cameras documenting every move, there would be no escaping the truth this time.


Body cameras on Mosher, Thomas Mendiola and Joshua Stark (the three shooters, who fired seven rounds into Erik, including five in his back) might have motivated the officers to opt for a much different, life-saving tactic: Follow Erik into the parking lot, de-escalate the situation by calmly talking to him, and check his legal concealed-carry permit. Everybody would have gone home safely…and Erik Scott would be alive and well today.

A full transcript of his entire testimony can be found at his website: williambscott.com

Bill’s book “the Permit,” a fictionalized account of Erik Scott’s murder, can be purchased via his personal website.

A related article Bill recently wrote for Politico.com about bodycams and how they may have affected not just Erik’s encounter with the LVMPD, but also how they potentially would have kept Michael Slager from murdering Walter Scott in North Charleston, South Carolina can be read here.

The unedited video of the full Nevada State Assembly’s Government Affairs Committee hearing on Nevada State Assembly Bill AB403 can be viewed here.

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Five Solutions To Reign In The Police State

The post below was shared with the CopBlock Network by “Jeremy,” via the CopBlock.org Submissions Page. It discusses abuses by the government and some solutions that could be implemented right now to halt what is rapidly becoming a police state within the United States.


The problem with police brutality and overreaction is appalling and ever growing.

What if I told you that there was a place where martial law was declared, a whole city was shut down, and the police detained anyone on the street and broke into countless peoples houses on the premise of protecting them? Thinking it must be China or Russia or Nazi Germany? No this tale happened here. In Boston after the marathon bombing.

Our rights as Americans are slowly being taken away under the guise of public safety. Did shutting down the city save anyone? No, but it set an extremely dangerous precedent of police trampling on the rights of the American people.

These brutal incidents are exactly the reason why the United States of America were formed in the first place. The Revolutionary War was  a case of the American people standing up and saying we will no longer tolerate oppression from those appointed to protect us. It starts at the bottom with the individual police force and will rapidly grow from there.

How do we make a difference? Here are five things that we can do to cause change.

  1. Require that all officers of the law wear body cameras at all times that they are performing their duties. This alone in forces that have adopted them has had an enormous impact in the number of incidents of police brutality. And as they are public servants, the public has a right to know what they are doing.
  2. Immediately stop all transfers of military equipment to police forces and confiscate or destroy all equipment previously transferred. Why? Because they are the police, not the military. The job of the military is to protect us from foreign threats and they are equipped to do so. The job of the police is to enforce the law, not protect the nation from an invading army. Why exactly do they need tanks and machine guns to enforce the law?
  3. Immediately enact strict physical fitness standards. Did you know that over 80% of cops are overweight? Did you ever think that if the officer involved in the Ferguson shooting was not overweight he may have been capable of arresting the young man without resorting to killing him? Too many police have only the option of deadly force to use against a suspect because they are incapable of holding their own due to their obesity.
  4. In any incident where police brutality is suspected, make it a requirement that an independent authority review the incident and recommend charges. A company who defrauds consumers doesn’t get to investigate itself to find if it did anything wrong, so why do the police get to?
  5. Prosecute and treat police as any other suspect would be treated. My mind goes back to a particular incident where a officer shot a man laying on the ground handcuffed in cold blood, was videotaped doing it, and only received a year in jail. If you or I did that we would either be jailed for life or given the death penalty for murder.

This is just the beginning. Will this fix everything? No, but it will serve to stop the march of the United States towards a police state.

If we do not act now, we will wake up one day to find that we have no rights left, and the only way to right the ship at that point will be armed revolution.