Tag Archives: Asa Jay

CopBlock Founder Ademo Freeman Preparing to Challenge Drug War in Court Jan. 11th During Marijuana Arrest Trial

Marijuana Possession Trial Ademo Freeman Adam Mueller

“When I go to trial I’m not asking to not be punished. I’m asking not to be punished anymore. I’ve done nearly 50 days in jail. I’ve paid tens of thousands of dollars in legal fees, lost a year’s worth of time and have basically been on probation for a year” – Ademo Freeman

The following video and post was originally published at CopBlock.org by Asa J under the title, “CopBlock Founder Ademo Freeman To Square Off In Court Against Drug War.” Obviously, it refers to Ademo’s arrest last year in Ohio on charges of possession of the scary, dangerous “drug” marijuana, that most people could not care less about at this point. More specifically, it relates to the trial for those charges that begins next week, on January 11th.

Barring some sort of eleventh hour plea deal with a sentence of time served (he has stated he would not agree to any deal that requires additional jail/prison time), Ademo will be facing up to six years in prison and fines of $20,000 if he is found guilty. More than likely, his freedom hinges on someone in the jury exercising their “Jury Nullificationrights and ruling based on the morality of the War on (Some) Drugs and the prosecution of victimless crimes, rather than the letter of the law.

Note: If you have videos, stories, upcoming events/protests, or personal interactions with the police (and/or “justice” system) that you would like to share, send them to us and we will do everything we can to bring it to the attention of the world. In addition, you can visit the Nevada Cop Block resources section for information and links to the rights of citizens when dealing with police, during which you should always be filming.

CopBlock Founder Ademo Freeman To Square Off In Court Against Drug War

Next week, CopBlock co-founder Ademo Freeman will square off against those wishing to send him to prison for peacefully traveling with medical marijuana in a state that also recognizes legal medicinal use of the plant.

You heard that right. Due to the lack of legal framework surrounding medical use of cannabis in Ohio (even though the state passed medical cannabis in 2016), Ademo faces up to six years in prison and fines of $20,000 when he stands trail on January 11 for possession of his medicine.

As such, Ohio law stipulates that the Board of Pharmacy attempt to negotiate and enter into reciprocity agreements with other medical marijuana states before allowing use of their medicine. Before entering into an agreement with another state, the Board must determine that the state meet certain criteria.

First, the eligibility requirements imposed by the other state in order to obtain a registry identification card have to be substantially comparable to Ohio’s requirements. Second, the other state must also recognize patient or caregiver registration and identification cards issued in Ohio. Ohio has no such agreement with Colorado, the state Ademo obtained his medical cannabis card in, nor any other state for that matter. In fact, the politicians of Ohio have dragged their feet for two years on this issue depriving who knows how many from receiving medical cannabis and killing countless others.

Ademo is no stranger to the criminal justice system. Shortly after founding CopBlock with activist and friend Pete Eyre in 2010 the two were part of a group of activists arrested for recording public officials at the Franklin County, Massachusetts jail.

The following year Ademo was arrested for wiretapping and faced 21 years in prison after video surfaced from West High School in Manchester, New Hampshire showing a student being roughly pushed down onto a cafeteria table by police detective Darren Murphy.

Ademo recorded telephone conversations he had with a Manchester police captain, the West High principal and her assistant in attempt to bring attention to the incident. He represented himself in court and was sentenced to 90 days in jail and three years of probation. Those convictions were later thrown out by the New Hampshire Supreme Court however.

CopBlock is a decentralized organization made up of a diverse group of individuals united by their shared belief that “badges don’t grant extra rights,” CopBlock.org states. In this pursuit CopBlockers routinely draw attention to police brutality and corruption and are known for their controversial and sometimes intense encounters with police. Naturally, shining a light on the domestic enforcement arm of government attracts unwanted attention. In February, Ademo was arrested and charged with possession and trafficking marijuana and possession of hash oil in Warren County, Ohio.

According to WCPO, 24 pounds of marijuana and 26 vials of hash oil were found in Ademo’s car after he was pulled over by Ohio State Troopers for a missing license plate light. He was arraigned on a $75,000 bond.

From behind bars Ademo routinely spoke out about police accountability issues and problems with the criminal justice system. He was released from jail in March following a major bond reduction having refused a plea deal to serve one year in prison.

Ademo has long been a crusader against the drug war, an issue that routinely garners attention on the pages of CopBlock.org. An advocate of self-ownership and an opponent of victimless crime laws, it was in fact a 2004 marijuana conviction that ultimately led Ademo to co-found CopBlock.

Now, almost 14 years later, Ademo continues to stand up for his individual right to decide for himself what to put in his own body. Next Thursday he will stand trial in Warren County having refused another plea offer this week that would have resulted in a 36 month prison sentence suspended for 6 months in jail and three years probation.

In a live Facebook video on Friday Ademo explained why.

“I’m a medical marijuana patient, ” he said. “I held a valid medical marijuana card until December 17 of last year. Everything I was in possession of that day was my medicine.”

Having lived in Colorado for a short while Ademo decided to return to Ohio temporarily after his plans to make a permanent move to the state didn’t work out. Ademo and his spouse (at the time) had decided not to move his partner’s children so far from their biological father (who came back into his young childrens life) and instead set up a forever home in Michigan (another medical MJ state) after the kids finished school. The only problem was, Ademo never made it back. He was caged by state troopers in the Warren County jail for simply stepping over a line into an occupied territory that seriously needs to clarify its laws regarding the legal use of medicinal cannabis.

“While they say ‘trafficking,’ I had everything I owned in my car,” Ademo said. “There was no drug bust. There were no informants. This wasn’t done at a DUI [checkpoint], I didn’t sell weed to an undercover cop. That’s not my intention. I use weed for medical purposes and I merely had six months worth of medicine with me.”

Ademo has asked people to please call assistant prosecutor Chris Delnicki at the telephone number 513-695-1325 to voice their support. He has also asked friends to send character letters stating that jail isn’t the proper punishment for his so-called “crimes” to Delnicki and/or Judge Robert Peeler at the address: 520 Justice Drive Lebanon, Ohio 45036.

“I don’t believe that my actions deserve 36 months in prison,” Ademo said. “When I go to trial I’m not asking to not be punished. I’m asking not to be punished anymore. I’ve done nearly 50 days in jail. I’ve paid tens of thousands of dollars in legal fees, lost a year’s worth of time and have basically been on probation for a year. I believe that that’s enough for someone with a medical marijuana card.”

To hear more of Ademo’s thoughts on the case listen below:

Original Facebook Live Video:

Related Content on NVCopBlock.org:

1 Comment

NYPD Civil Asset Forfeiture Thefts Have Spurred Federal Class Action Lawsuit

NYPD Civil Asset Forfeiture Lawsuit
As everyone in the world (and several other parts of the galaxy) knows, civil asset forfeiture laws are essentially a license to steal for police departments. Without any real or substantial evidence being required, members of the Gang in Blue are given the opportunity to snatch cash and other valuables from citizens not affiliated with the mafia family they work for.

Even if those that have had their money and/or property stolen are never convicted or even charged with a crime, it’s very difficult and sometimes impossible for them to get those possessions back. Not only is there no legal burden for the government to prove what they stole was derived from illegal activity, victims of their thievery are instead forced to prove a negative and show that it wasn’t.

There’s no shortage of examples of innocent motorists being preyed upon by Road Pirates, many times based on nothing except the fact that they have out of state license plates. Sometimes, it’s just a crime of opportunity and nothing more. I.E. some very minor “infraction” is spotted by a Revenue Generator and they use that as a pretense to pull a driver over when the true and sole purpose is just to troll for something worth stealing.

The other common source of forfeiture plunder is even more problematic. Along with that license to steal comes a license to kill during drug raids. Once those Drug Warriors suit up in their military gear, strap on their military weapons, and climb into their military vehicles, even babies sleeping in their cribs and innocent neighbors aren’t safe. But that money ain’t gonna steal itself and drugs aren’t gonna disappear from evidence lockers by them self. You know how the old saying about omelets go: sometimes you gotta murder an innocent, 92 year old woman and then plant drugs at her house if you wanna steal her money.

Civil Asset Forfeiture CashOver the years, the for-profit policing methods spurred by the advent of asset seizure laws have been so lucrative that many police departments, especially those in small otherwise crime free communities, have come to derive a good percentage, if not the majority, of their budgets from a combination of forfeiture theft and speedtrap/checkpoint revenue (the latter often overlapping with the former). As was reported by CopBlock Network contributor Asa Jay last week, the Road Pirates in Oklahoma have even come up with a way of stealing money from debit cards recently.

Obviously, New York is a big enough city to have other ways of stealing from citizens beyond relying solely on the police to shake people down directly. However, the world’s seventh largest army, otherwise known as the NYPD, does its share of fleecing people within that city, too. After all, when you have access to what amounts to free money, why not take advantage? (Outside of ethical reasons, which they constantly prove aren’t an issue for them.)

In fact, they have a pretty elaborate system and a set of co-conspirators within the District Attorney’s office working to ensure that people don’t get their money and property back once police find an excuse to grab it. The Bronx Defenders, a law firm that has filed a class action lawsuit against the NYPD on behalf of the victims of asset forfeiture within the city has detailed just how their scheme works within the suit and it’s really pretty simple.

Via the New York Daily News:

“They have set up such a complicated process that some people give up and never get their property back,” said lead attorney Molly Kovel of The Bronx Defenders.

Kaleb Hagis, one of the new plaintiffs, said cops seized his car, $2,932 in cash and four cell phones when he was arrested in Sept. 2015. His vehicle was returned in December, but he is still fighting to get the phones and cash — even though charges against him were dropped in March.

He said the Bronx District Attorney’s office has refused to issue release forms necessary for the NYPD property clerk to hand over the items…

After putting in a request to the NYPD property clerk for the items, an individual has 270 days to get a release form from the district attorney.

After that deadline, the NYPD can “dispose” of the property.

“My case was dismissed,” said plaintiff Kenneth Clavasquin, whose phone was seized when he was arrested in June of last year. “I don’t understand why I can’t get my phone back from the city!”

The original plaintiff, Victor Encarnacion, said he only received his phone taken during his November 2014 arrest after the lawsuit was filed earlier this year and seveal months after his case was dismissed.

Requests by his attorneys were ignored, according to the complaint. During a Sept. 2015 visit to the DA’s office with his attorney, Encarnacion was told he could not get a release.

It’s a good racket if you can run it. After you steal people’s property you give them a limited amount of time to get it back before you are allowed to “dispose” of it. Then you get your friends at the DA’s office to stonewall them until that time runs out. Robbing banks is for amateurs.

Fortunately for them, the guy who gets to decide whether they have to stop stealing people’s money is also on the same payroll as them. More than likely, at worst their robed co-worker will just make it just a little bit more difficult for them to snatch people’s stuff.

John Oliver, of HBO’s “Last Week Tonight,” explains civil forfeiture laws

1 Comment