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LVMPD to Hold Thomas McEniry Public Police Fatality Review on Monday September 19th


On November 24th of 2015, Thomas McEniry was shot by LVMPD Officers Kyle Prior, Robert Nord, and Donald Sutton III. They’ve claimed that at the time he was shot McEniry had picked a (pellet) gun up from the ground and pointed it at them.

However, if you watch Officer Prior’s bodycam video (embedded below) not only do they cut it off as soon as he begins to put his hand down toward the ground, there is no visible gun at the location where he is moving his hand to. I’ve slowed the video down and watched it frame by frame and I don’t personally see a gun where they claim it was.

It would seem pretty logical that if someone had picked up a gun and pointed it at them, they could eliminate any dispute of it being justified simply by showing them do that. But, for no apparent reason, they didn’t that.

Also, although there was at least one other cop wearing a bodycam that day. Instead of releasing that footage, they released one screenshot showing a gun sitting against the garage door, a position that it could not have been in without being visible on the video.

Without any sort of context for that screenshot (such as the rest of the video showing the gun being discovered and moved to that position), it proves absolutely nothing. Once again, for no apparent reason they didn’t provide that.

LVMPD Shooting Video Thomas McEniryIt’ll be interesting to see if they show the footage of this gun he supposedly picked up and aimed at them and the footage of the second body camera during the review or if they continue hiding the full body cam footage. At that point, you’ll pretty much know there’s a reason they don’t want to release it publicly. (Note: I’ve been told that the family received multiple body cam videos, so it would seem that they do intend to show more than what was initially released, at least.)

These public reviews are really a joke where the cops put out their official story and bury any information that might contradict it. The official title given them, “Police Fatality Public Fact Finding Review” deserves an award for the level of Orwellian doublespeak it represents.

In reality, they were created by former Sheriff Gillespie and the Las Vegas Police Protective Association (police union) to eliminate scrutiny of police shootings after the murders of Erik Scott and Trevon Cole by members of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department led many within Las Vegas to question Metro’s use of force and absolute lack of accountability. Instead of replacing the Coroner’s Inquest that previously was used after police shootings with something more fair and transparent, as the public had demanded, they went the bait and switch route in order to eliminate any semblance of either.

However, it is still good to attend them in order to witness just how much of a blatant coverup it is and to show support for the family and friends of those the LVMPD murder. It also let’s them know we paying attention and aren’t just accepting their cover-ups and lies. You can also submit questions during the review, although they pick and choose which questions are “appropriate” to be asked. That means anything that seriously questions their official narrative and can’t be easily deflected gets filtered out.

If you are unable to physically attend, you can also watch a live feed of the review.

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Beyond Sept. 9th, Support the Largest Prison Strike in History and Help Eliminate Prison Slave Labor

Note: Previously, CopBlock Network Contributor Josh Hotchkins also published a post previewing and discussing the prison strike.

The growth of the prison industrial complex has been discussed many times on the CopBlock Network, as well as the ways in which prisons have become a modern day form of slavery. The fact is that the United States now has the largest population of incarcerated people in the world by a large margin and every indication is that the government intends to expand that lead.

In addition, the privatization of prisons (which the Federal Government’s recent decision to stop participating in will make little real impact on) has created a form of slave labor that both violates human rights and encourages the corporations and politicians profiting off that system to lock more people up.

It’s also no secret that most, if not all, of us at the CopBlock Network oppose victimless crimes. The largest instance of prosecution for victimless crimes, as well as human rights abuses and violence perpetrated by law enforcement, involves the War on (Some) Drugs. The Drug War and the huge number of non-violent drug offenders that are sent to prison as a result are in large part responsible for the enormous expansion in the U.S. prison population over the past several decades.

On September 9th, which is the 45 year anniversary of the Attica State Prison Uprising, prisons around the country began strikes designed to force reform of prison labor policies and improvements to basic human living conditions within those prisons. Outside of the prisons, many groups around the country and even outside of the United States are holding solidarity actions in support of the prisoners taking part in the strike.

Whether you are now or ever have been directly effected by the growing prison industrial complex, there are many reasons why you should help halt its expansion and even to put an end to it.

Some of the companies that benefit from prison slave labor:

The Industrial Workers of the World’s Incarcerated Worker Organizing Committee is helping to promote and organize actions in support of the prisoners. You can also find updates at the website of “It’s Going Down,” an Anarchist-based website that posts information and announcements about grassroots actions.

Additional links for information and updates:

Transcript of Video Included Above:

This is a Call to Action Against Slavery in America

In one voice, rising from the cells of long term solitary confinement, echoed in the dormitories and cell blocks from Virginia to Oregon, we prisoners across the United States vow to finally end slavery in 2016.

On September 9th of 1971 prisoners took over and shut down Attica, New York State’s most notorious prison. On September 9th of 2016, we will begin an action to shut down prisons all across this country. We will not only demand the end to prison slavery, we will end it ourselves by ceasing to be slaves.

In the 1970s the US prison system was crumbling. In Walpole, San Quentin, Soledad, Angola and many other prisons, people were standing up, fighting and taking ownership of their lives and bodies back from the plantation prisons. For the last six years we have remembered and renewed that struggle. In the interim, the prisoner population has ballooned and technologies of control and confinement have developed into the most sophisticated and repressive in world history. The prisons have become more dependent on slavery and torture to maintain their stability.

Prisoners are forced to work for little or no pay. That is slavery. The 13th amendment to the US constitution maintains a legal exception for continued slavery in US prisons. It states “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States.” Overseers watch over our every move, and if we do not perform our appointed tasks to their liking, we are punished. They may have replaced the whip with pepper spray, but many of the other torments remain: isolation, restraint positions, stripping off our clothes and investigating our bodies as though we are animals.

Slavery is alive and well in the prison system, but by the end of this year, it won’t be anymore. This is a call to end slavery in America. This call goes directly to the slaves themselves. We are not making demands or requests of our captors, we are calling ourselves to action. To every prisoner in every state and federal institution across this land, we call on you to stop being a slave, to let the crops rot in the plantation fields, to go on strike and cease reproducing the institutions of your confinement.

This is a call for a nation-wide prisoner work stoppage to end prison slavery, starting on September 9th, 2016. They cannot run these facilities without us.

Non-violent protests, work stoppages, hunger strikes and other refusals to participate in prison routines and needs have increased in recent years. The 2010 Georgia prison strike, the massive rolling California hunger strikes, the Free Alabama Movement’s 2014 work stoppage, have gathered the most attention, but they are far from the only demonstrations of prisoner power. Large, sometimes effective hunger strikes have broken out at Ohio State Penitentiary, at Menard Correctional in Illinois, at Red Onion in Virginia as well as many other prisons. The burgeoning resistance movement is diverse and interconnected, including immigrant detention centers, women’s prisons and juvenile facilities. Last fall, women prisoners at Yuba County Jail in California joined a hunger strike initiated by women held in immigrant detention centers in California, Colorado and Texas.

attica-prison-uprising-riotPrisoners all across the country regularly engage in myriad demonstrations of power on the inside. They have most often done so with convict solidarity, building coalitions across race lines and gang lines to confront the common oppressor.

Forty-five years after Attica, the waves of change are returning to America’s prisons. This September we hope to coordinate and generalize these protests, to build them into a single tidal shift that the American prison system cannot ignore or withstand. We hope to end prison slavery by making it impossible, by refusing to be slaves any longer.

To achieve this goal, we need support from people on the outside. A prison is an easy-lockdown environment, a place of control and confinement where repression is built into every stone wall and chain link, every gesture and routine. When we stand up to these authorities, they come down on us, and the only protection we have is solidarity from the outside. Mass incarceration, whether in private or state-run facilities is a scheme where slave catchers patrol our neighborhoods and monitor our lives. It requires mass criminalization. Our tribulations on the inside are a tool used to control our families and communities on the outside. Certain Americans live every day under not only the threat of extra-judicial execution—as protests surrounding the deaths of Mike Brown, Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland and so many others have drawn long overdue attention to—but also under the threat of capture, of being thrown into these plantations, shackled and forced to work.

Our protest against prison slavery is a protest against the school to prison pipeline, a protest against police terror, a protest against post-release controls. When we abolish slavery, they’ll lose much of their incentive to lock up our children, they’ll stop building traps to pull back those who they’ve released. When we remove the economic motive and grease of our forced labor from the US prison system, the entire structure of courts and police, of control and slave-catching must shift to accommodate us as humans, rather than slaves.

Prison impacts everyone, when we stand up and refuse on September 9th, 2016, we need to know our friends, families and allies on the outside will have our backs. This spring and summer will be seasons of organizing, of spreading the word, building the networks of solidarity and showing that we’re serious and what we’re capable of.

Step up, stand up, and join us.
Against prison slavery.
For liberation of all.

The Attica Prison Uprising and Aftermath:

Additional Videos:


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Henderson Cop Caught on Video Kicking Man In Diabetic Shock In Head Five Times Promoted

Brett Seekatz Henderson Police Beating

(Note: This post was originally published at and was written by .)

Despite being filmed repeatedly kicking a man in the head during a traffic stop, a Henderson, Nevada police officer has been promoted.

Sergeant Brett Seekatz is seen in the footage with Nevada highway patrol troopers and Henderson police officers mistaking a man suffering from a diabetic episode for a drunk driver during a traffic stop on Oct. 29, 2010.

The video shows an officer pointing his firearm at Adam Greene through his open car door before the man is pulled out of the vehicle and onto the ground while the car remains in gear and begins slowly rolling away.

As an officer brings the vehicle to a stop, Greene is restrained by several cops and Seekatz is seen entering the frame and kicking him five times in the head while one of the officers says, “Stop resisting mother fucker! Stop resisting!”

Greene moans unnervingly during the struggle and his legs contort while another officer is seen kneeing him four times in the midsection. He is then handcuffed and placed into a police vehicle.

Watch the raw footage:

Following the incident, Henderson police chief Jutta Chambers announced her retirement and Clark County District Attorney Steve Wolfson did not bring any criminal charges against Seekatz for his unnecessary use of force.

Seekatz, who has worked for the Henderson Police Department since August 2002, was among 14 employees who received promotions last Thursday. He is now a lieutenant.

Current police chief Patrick Moers said the promotions became official on Monday, and are internal, meaning they do not need to be approved by the Henderson City Council with a vote.

“Whatever happened with him, happened six years ago,” Moers said. “I wasn’t chief at the time. Nothing was brought forward on any matters. No criminal charges were filed.”

Moers said the matter had already been taken care of by the previous administration and claimed Seekatz had “been a good employee and was doing quite well as a sergeant.” He added, “we need to understand that people can grow and develop as employees throughout their career.”

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